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Action Plans

Administrative Agreements

Annual Reports - SARA

  • Species at Risk Act Annual Report 2019 (2021-03-26)
    Every year the Minister of Environment and Climate Change Canada (the Minister) is required to table in Parliament the Species at Risk Act (SARA) annual report. This report summarizes key activities carried out in 2019 under SARA and fulfills the Minister’s obligation to report annually on the administration of the Act.
  • Species at Risk Act annual report 2018 (2020-05-27)
    Every year the Minister of Environment and Climate Change Canada (the Minister) is required to table in Parliament the Species at Risk Act (SARA) annual report. This report summarizes key activities carried out in 2018 under SARA and fulfills the Minister’s obligation to report annually on the administration of the Act.
  • Species at Risk Act annual report 2017 (2019-03-22)
    This report summarizes activities carried out in 2017 related to the Species at Risk Act (SARA). The report fulfills the Minister of Environment and Climate Change’s obligation, under section 126 of the Act, to prepare an annual report on the administration of SARA for each calendar year.
  • Species at Risk Act Annual Report 2016 (2018-03-23)
    This report summarizes activities carried out in 2016 related to the Species at Risk Act (SARA). The report fulfills the Minister of Environment and Climate Change’s obligation, under section 126 of the Act, to prepare an annual report on the administration of SARA for each calendar year.
  • Species at Risk Act – Annual Report for 2015 (2016-11-04)
    This report summarizes activities carried out in 2015 related to the Species at Risk Act (SARA). The report fulfills the Minister of Environment and Climate Change’s obligation, under section 126 of the Act, to prepare an annual report on the administration of SARA for each calendar year. ERRATUM Please note that a photo was replaced on page 38 of the PDF version after the report was posted on the web site.
  • Species at Risk Act – Annual Report for 2014 (2016-02-17)
    This report summarizes activities carried out in 2014 related to the Species at Risk Act (SARA). The report fulfills the Minister of the Environment’s obligation, under section 126 of the Act, to prepare an annual report on the administration of SARA for each calendar year.
  • Species at Risk Act Annual Report for 2013 (2014-12-02)
    This report summarizes activities carried out in 2013 related to the Species at Risk Act (SARA). The report fulfills the Minister of the Environment’s obligation, under section 126 of the Act, to prepare an annual report on the administration of SARA for each calendar year. The Act requires that the report include a summary of: the assessments of the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) and the Minister’s response ...
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Conservation Agreements

Consultation Documents

COSEWIC Annual Reports

  • COSEWIC Annual Report 2019 to 2020 (2020-09-02)
    Over the past year COSEWIC assessed a total of 21 wildlife species, none of which were assigned a status of Not at Risk. Of these 21, COSEWIC re-examined the status of nine wildlife species; of these, 44% were reassessed at the same or lower level of risk. To date and with the submission of this report, COSEWIC’s assessments now include 810 wildlife species in various risk categories including 363 Endangered, 190 Threatened, 235 Special Concern, ...
  • Letter from COSEWIC to the Minister of the Environment & Climate Change (2020-09-02)
    Over the past year COSEWIC assessed a total of 21 wildlife species, none of which were assigned a status of Not at Risk. Of these 21, COSEWIC re-examined the status of nine wildlife species; of these, 44% were reassessed at the same or lower level of risk. To date and with the submission of this report, COSEWIC’s assessments now include 810 wildlife species in various risk categories including 363 Endangered, 190 Threatened, 235 Special Concern, ...
  • Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada, seeking your opinion: feedback form (2019-10-09)
    Over the past year COSEWIC assessed a total of 56 wildlife species, 2 of which were assigned a status of not at risk. Of these 56, COSEWIC re-examined the status of 25 wildlife species; of these, the majority (80%) were reassessed at the same or lower level of risk. To date and with the submission of this report, COSEWIC’s assessments now include 799 wildlife species in various risk categories including 356 endangered, 189 threatened, 232 special ...
  • COSEWIC Annual Report 2018 to 2019 (2019-10-09)
    Over the past year COSEWIC assessed a total of 56 wildlife species, 2 of which were assigned a status of not at risk. Of these 56, COSEWIC re-examined the status of 25 wildlife species; of these, the majority (80%) were reassessed at the same or lower level of risk. To date and with the submission of this report, COSEWIC’s assessments now include 799 wildlife species in various risk categories including 356 endangered, 189 threatened, 232 special ...
  • Letter from COSEWIC to the Minister of the Environment & Climate Change (2019-10-09)
    Over the past year COSEWIC assessed a total of 56 wildlife species, 2 of which were assigned a status of not at risk. Of these 56, COSEWIC re-examined the status of 25 wildlife species; of these, the majority (80%) were reassessed at the same or lower level of risk. To date and with the submission of this report, COSEWIC’s assessments now include 799 wildlife species in various risk categories including 356 endangered, 189 threatened, 232 special ...
  • COSEWIC Annual Report 2017 to 2018 (2018-10-15)
    Over the past year COSEWIC assessed a total of 90 wildlife species and 11 of these were assigned a status of Not at Risk. Of these 90, COSEWIC re-examined the status of 38 wildlife species; of these, the majority (87%) were reassessed at the same or lower level of risk. To date and with the submission of this report, COSEWIC’s assessments now include 771 wildlife species in various risk categories including 338 Endangered, 183 Threatened, 228 Spe ...
  • Letter from COSEWIC to the Minister of the Environment & Climate Change (2018-10-15)
    Over the past year COSEWIC assessed a total of 90 wildlife species and 11 of these were assigned a status of Not at Risk. Of these 90, COSEWIC re-examined the status of 38 wildlife species; of these, the majority (87%) were reassessed at the same or lower level of risk. To date and with the submission of this report, COSEWIC’s assessments now include 771 wildlife species in various risk categories including 338 Endangered, 183 Threatened, 228 Spe ...
  • >> See more COSEWIC Annual Reports documents

COSEWIC Assessments

COSEWIC List of wildlife species assessed

  • Canadian Wildlife Species at Risk October 2020 (2020-11-09)
    The Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) assesses the national status of wild species, subspecies, varieties, or other designatable units that are considered to be at risk in Canada. Designations are made on native wildlife species including the following taxonomic groups: mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, fishes, arthropods, molluscs, vascular plants, mosses, and lichens.
  • Canadian Wildlife Species at Risk 2019 (2019-11-22)
    The Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) assesses the national status of wild species, subspecies, varieties, or other designatable units that are considered to be at risk in Canada. Designations are made on native wildlife species including the following taxonomic groups: mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, fishes, arthropods, molluscs, vascular plants, mosses, and lichens.
  • Canadian wildlife species at risk October 2018 (2019-02-01)
    The Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) assesses the national status of wild species, subspecies, varieties, or other designatable units that are considered to be at risk in Canada. Designations are made on native wildlife species including the following taxonomic groups: mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, fishes, arthropods, molluscs, vascular plants, mosses, and lichens.
  • Canadian wildlife species at risk October 2017 (2017-10-15)
    The Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) assesses the national status of wild species, subspecies, varieties, or other designatable units that are considered to be at risk in Canada. Designations are made on native wildlife species including the following taxonomic groups: mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, fishes, arthropods, molluscs, vascular plants, mosses, and lichens.
  • Canadian Wildlife Species at Risk Booklet - October 2016 (2016-11-04)
    The Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) assesses the national status of wild species, subspecies, varieties, or other designatable units that are considered to be at risk in Canada. Designations are made on native wildlife species including the following taxonomic groups: mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, fishes, arthropods, molluscs, vascular plants, mosses, and lichens.
  • COSEWIC List of wildlife species assessed (including May 2005) (2005-11-10)
    The Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) assesses the national status of wild species, subspecies, varieties, or other designatable units that are considered to be at risk in Canada. Designations are made on native species including the following taxonomic groups: mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, fishes, arthropods, molluscs, vascular plants, mosses, and lichens.
  • COSEWIC List of wildlife species assessed (including Nov 2004) (2004-11-01)
    The Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) assesses the national status of wild species, subspecies, varieties, or other designatable units that are considered to be at risk in Canada. Designations are made on native species including the following taxonomic groups: mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, fishes, arthropods, molluscs, vascular plants, mosses, and lichens.
  • >> See more COSEWIC List of wildlife species assessed documents

COSEWIC Status Reports

  • COSEWIC Assessment and Status Report on the Chestnut-collared Longspur (Calcarius ornatus) in Canada (2020-10-26)
    Chestnut-collared Longspur is a medium-sized songbird. It is one of two longspurs (family Calcariidae) that nest in grassland. Breeding males are boldly marked, with a black breast, belly, crown, and eye-line contrasting with a buffy-yellow throat, whitish supercilium, and chestnut patch on the nape; in winter the pattern is heavily muted and more similar to the year-round overall buffy, streaked appearance of females. In all plumages, Chestnut-c ...
  • COSEWIC Assessment and Status Report on the Great Basin Spadefoot (Spea intermontana) in Canada (2020-10-26)
    Great Basin Spadefoot, Spea intermontana, is one of two species of spadefoots (family Scaphiopodidae) that occur in Canada. Adults are small to medium-sized toad-like amphibians, about 40–65 mm long, and have a squat body and relatively short legs. Diagnostic features include a black, keratinous ridge (“spade”) on the sole of each hind foot used for burrowing and eyes with a vertical, lens-shaped pupil, indicative of good night vision. The specie ...
  • COSEWIC Assessment and Status Report on the Reversed Haploa Moth (Haploa reversa) in Canada (2020-10-26)
    Reversed Haploa Moth (Haploa reversa) is medium-sized (wingspan of 33 – 48mm) and with a dorsal wing pattern of brown bands and white patches, including a distinctive white triangular basal patch extending from the thorax through to the forewings; and three similarly sized, distinctive white costal patches (patches on the leading edge of the forewing). The larvae are black with yellow to orange longitudinal stripes and an orangish to reddish dors ...
  • COSEWIC Assessment and Status Report on the Suckley’s Cuckoo Bumble Bee (Bombus suckleyi) in Canada (2020-10-26)
    Suckley’s Cuckoo Bumble Bee is one of six true cuckoo bumble bee species occurring in North America. Both sexes are medium-sized (15–25 mm length). Females are slightly larger than males and have an abdomen with shiny black terga (dorsal abdominal segments) and yellow hairs near the tip; males have a similar colour pattern, but with more yellow hair on the abdomen. Unlike nest-building bumble bees, female cuckoo bumble bees do not possess a corbi ...
  • COSEWIC Assessment and Status Report on the Coastrange Sculpin (Cottus aleuticus) Cultus Lake population in Canada (2020-10-21)
    This small-bodied freshwater fish is found in a single lake that drains into the lower Fraser River, in southwestern British Columbia. This area is undergoing increasing urbanization and recreational use. Every night, this unique population migrates from the lake bottom toward the lake surface to feed. A recent introduction of an exotic predator, Smallmouth Bass, is a serious concern to the long-term persistence of the sculpin. The species is als ...
  • COSEWIC Assessment and Status Report on the Columbia Sculpin (Cottus hubbsi) in Canada (2020-10-21)
    Columbia Sculpin is a small, bottom-dwelling fish with a body that tapers from a relatively large head and pectoral fins to a narrow caudal peduncle. Columbia Sculpin reaches a maximum total length of about 110 mm. It is distinguished from other co-occurring sculpins by a relatively long head, a complete lateral line, and striking broad, dark bars on the caudal fin, and oblique dark bars on the anal fin. There is no evidence supporting multiple d ...
  • COSEWIC Assessment and Status Report on the Plains Hog-nosed Snake (Heterodon nasicus) in Canada (2020-10-21)
    Plains Hog-nosed Snake (Heterodon nasicus) is one of two species of hog-nosed snakes in Canada, the other being Eastern Hog-nosed Snake (Heterodon platirhinos) in Ontario. Adults range from 45 cm to 75 cm snout-to-vent length and are stout bodied. Distinguishing features include an upturned scale at the tip of the snout, giving the snake its hog-nosed appearance. The defensive behaviours exhibited by Plains Hog-nosed Snake, such as flaring of the ...
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Critical Habitat Descriptions in the Canada Gazette

Critical Habitat Orders

Critical Habitat Reports

Critical Habitat Statements

Exceptions

  • Public Registry Notice for s.83 Exceptions - 19 Wing Comox (2015-03-06)
    Activity: Canadian military training and operations. Military training and operations of NATO and non-NATO allies. Non-defence related training and operations related to national security conducted by DND (Department of National Defence) and/or other government organizations. Operations directed to ensure that training areas are sustainable for activities related to national defence/security. Range trai
  • Public Registry Notice for s.83 Exceptions - CFB Esquimalt (2015-03-06)
    Operations directed to ensuring that training areas are sustainable for activities related to national defence/security. Specifically, the exceptions apply to activities for the control and management of vegetation that interferes with, or restricts, training.
  • Public Registry Notice for s.83 Exceptions - Former Camp Ipperwash (2015-03-06)
    As per the Memorandum of Understanding between DND, Environment Canada, and the Parks Canada Agency: 6.1 c) Activities occurring on Defence Establishments that are considered necessary for public safety in accordance with paragraph a) and authorized under the National Defence Act and the Explosives Act are: Remediation of contaminated sites; and Securing, handl

Factsheet

  • Questions and answers: Critical habitat of the Atlantic Salmon, inner Bay of Fundy population (2020-11-13)
    Critical habitat is defined in the Species at Risk Act (SARA) as the habitat that is necessary for the survival or recovery of a listed wildlife species and that is identified as such in the recovery strategy or action plan for the species. For aquatic species, critical habitat may include areas used for spawning, rearing young, feeding and migration. SARA requires that critical habitat be identified to the extent possible for all endangered, thr ...
  • Agricultural Producers and the Sage-Grouse Recovery Strategy (2015-01-15)
    Successful recovery of the Sage-Grouse requires involvement of agricultural producers, local stakeholders and governments at all levels. For its part, the Government of Canada starts with developing a Recovery Strategy. The Recovery Strategy is a planning document that describes current scientific knowledge on threats to species and identifies critical habitat needed for the survival and recovery of the Sage-Grouse. The Recovery Strategy also ide ...
  • Bat and Cave/Karst Researchers and the Emergency Listing Order (2014-12-17)
    The Government of Canada has added three species of bats to the List of Wildlife Species at Risk in Canada (also known as Schedule I of the Species at Risk Act). These three bats species - the Little Brown Myotis (Myotis lucifugus), the Northern Myotis (Myotis septentrionalis) and the Tri-colored Bat (Perimyotis subflavus) - have been listed as Endangered, as their survival is immin
  • Bats in Buildings and the Emergency Listing Order (2014-12-17)
    The Government of Canada has added three species of bats to the List of Wildlife Species at Risk in Canada (also known as Schedule I of the Species at Risk Act). These three bats species - the Little Brown Myotis (Myotis lucifugus), the Northern Myotis (Myotis septentrionalis) and the Tri-colored Bat (Perimyotis subflavus) - have been listed as Endangered, as their survival is immin
  • Caving Tourism and the Emergency Listing Order (2014-12-17)
    The Government of Canada has added three species of bats to the List of Wildlife Species at Risk in Canada (also known as Schedule I of the Species at Risk Act). These three bats species - the Little Brown Myotis (Myotis lucifugus), the Northern Myotis (Myotis septentrionalis) and the Tri-colored Bat (Perimyotis subflavus) - have been listed as Endangered, as their survival is immin
  • Factsheet on the Emergency Listing Order for the Little Brown Myotis, the Northern Myotis and the Tri-colored Bat (2014-12-17)
    The Government of Canada has added three species of bats to the List of Wildlife Species at Risk in Canada (also known as Schedule I of the Species at Risk Act). These three bats species - the Little Brown Myotis (Myotis lucifugus), the Northern Myotis (Myotis septentrionalis) and the Tri-colored Bat (Perimyotis subflavus) - have been listed as Endangered, as their survival is immin
  • Mining and the Emergency Listing Order (2014-12-17)
    The Government of Canada has added three species of bats to the List of Wildlife Species at Risk in Canada (also known as Schedule I of the Species at Risk Act). These three bats species - the Little Brown Myotis (Myotis lucifugus), the Northern Myotis (Myotis septentrionalis) and the Tri-colored Bat (Perimyotis subflavus) - have been listed as Endangered, as their survival is immin
  • >> See more Factsheet documents

General Status of Wildlife Reports

  • Wild Species 2015: The General Status of Species in Canada (2017-06-22)
    Wild Species 2015 is the fourth report of the series after 2000, 2005, and 2010. The aim of the Wild Species series is to provide an overview on which species occur in Canada, in which provinces, territories or ocean regions they occur, and what their status is. Each species assessed in this report received a rank among the following categories: Presumed Extirpated (X), Possibly Extirpated (H), Critically Imperiled (1), Imperiled (2), Vulnerable ...
  • Wild Species 2010: The General Status of Species in Canada (2017-04-10)
    Wild Species 2010 is the third report of the series after 2000 and 2005. The aim of the Wild Species series is to provide an overview on which species occur in Canada, in which provinces, territories or ocean regions they occur, and what is their status. Each species assessed in this report received a rank among the following categories: Extinct (0.2), Extirpated (0.1), At Risk (1), May Be At Risk (2), Sensitive (3), Secure (4), Undetermined (5), ...
  • The Status of Wild Species in Canada (SARA General Status Report 2003–2008: Overview Document) (2009-02-27)
    SARA requires that a general report on the status of wildlife species be prepared five years after section 128 comes into force (2003) and every five years thereafter. The purpose of the report is to provide Canadians with an overview on which wild species are doing fine, which to keep an eye on, and which need to be formally assessed by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC). This document, The Status of Wild Spec ...
  • Wild Species 2005: The General Status of Species in Canada (2006-10-27)
    The intent of the Wild Species series is to answer the following fundamental questions about wild species in Canada: which species occur in Canada, in which provinces, territories or ocean regions do they occur, and what is their status? To accomplish this goal, Wild Species 2005: The General Status of Species in Canada presents the results of general status assessments for a broad cross-section of Canadian species. General status assessments are ...
  • Wild Species 2000: The General Status of Species in Canada (2001-04-20)
    The Wild Species reports provide an overview of the status of Canada's species. They bring the results of provincial, territorial, and federal monitoring efforts onto a single platform for the first time. Wild Species reports are released every five years and Wild Species 2005 is now available. This is the commitment of all of Canada's Ministers responsible for wildlife under the Accord for the Protection of Species At Risk. Database of the r ...

Management Plans

Orders

  • Order Amending Schedule 1 to the Species at Risk Act (Volume 155, Number 10, May 2021) (2021-05-12)
    Her Excellency the Governor General in Council, on the recommendation of the Minister of the Environment, acknowledges receipt, on the making of this Order, of the assessments done pursuant to subsection 23(1) of the Species at Risk Act, by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) with respect to the species set out in the annexed schedule.
  • Order Amending Schedule 1 to the Species at Risk Act (2021-02-20)
    The objectives of the proposed Order Amending Schedule 1 to the Species at Risk Act (the Order) are to help maintain Canada's biodiversity and support the well-being of Canadian ecosystems by preventing wildlife species from becoming extirpated from Canada or extinct and to contribute to their recovery, as well as to respond to COSEWIC's recommendations.
  • Order Acknowledging Receipt of the Assessments Done Pursuant to Subsection 23(1) of the Act: SI/2021-6 (2021-02-17)
    The objectives of the proposed Order Amending Schedule 1 to the Species at Risk Act (the Order) are to help maintain Canada's biodiversity and support the well-being of Canadian ecosystems by preventing wildlife species from becoming extirpated from Canada or extinct and to contribute to their recovery, as well as to respond to COSEWIC's recommendations.
  • Order Amending Schedule 1 to the Species at Risk Act: CG, Part II, Volume 154, Number 22 (2020-10-28)
    The Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) completed reassessments of the status of three aquatic wildlife species: Carmine Shiner, Rainbow Smelt (Lake Utopia large-bodied population) and Rainbow Smelt (Lake Utopia small-bodied population). These three species are currently listed as threatened on the List of Wildlife Species at Risk (Schedule 1) of the Species at Risk Act</ci
  • Order Amending Schedule 1 to the Species at Risk Act (2020-09-05)
    Her Excellency the Governor General in Council, on the recommendation of the Minister of the Environment, acknowledges receipt, on the making of this Order, of the assessments done pursuant to subsection 23(1) of the Species at Risk Act, by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) with respect to the species set out in the annexed schedule.
  • Order Acknowledging Receipt of the Assessments Done Pursuant to Subsection 23(1) of the Act (2020-09-02)
    Her Excellency the Governor General in Council, on the recommendation of the Minister of the Environment, acknowledges receipt, on the making of this Order, of the assessments done pursuant to subsection 23(1) of the Species at Risk Act, by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) with respect to the species set out in the annexed schedule.
  • Order Amending Schedule 1 to the Species at Risk Act (Volume 154, Number 4, January 25 2020) (2020-01-25)
    The Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) completed reassessments of the status of three aquatic wildlife species: Carmine Shiner, Rainbow Smelt (Lake Utopia large-bodied population) and Rainbow Smelt (Lake Utopia small-bodied population). These three species are currently listed as threatened on the List of Wildlife Species at Risk (Schedule 1) of the Species at Risk Act</ci
  • >> See more Orders documents

Parliamentary review

  • Progress Report on the Species at Risk Act (2009-05-15)
    This report provides an overview of the implementation of the Species at Risk Act (SARA). It has been prepared for parliamentarians who will be participating in the first Parliamentary five-year review of the Act.

Permits and Related Agreements

  • Explanation for issuing permit(#21-PPAC-00006 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2021-06-01)
    The purpose of the sampling is to monitor recovery of Salish Sucker and investigate suspected but unconfirmed populations of Salish Sucker and Nooksack Dace in new watersheds. The permitted activities include: 1. Mark-recapture sampling of Salish Suckers using Feddes and Gee traps in Pepin Creek and Chilliwack Delta (Atchelitz, Luckakuck, Semmihault, and Little Chilliwack Creek) watersheds. a. For captured Salish Suckers, administration of ...
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#21-PPAC-00007 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2021-06-01)
    The activities authorized by this permit consist of: 1. Pre- and post-habitat restoration sampling and salvage of Nooksack Dace in Bertrand Creek and Pepin Creek using Gee minnow trapping, kick seining, and/or electrofishing, for up to a maximum of three electrofishing passes per site. 2. For all captured Nooksack Dace, administration of anesthesia (MS-222) and measurement of basic biological information (length, weight and sex). Subcutaneo ...
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#21-PPAC-00014 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2021-06-01)
    The research consists of three components: 1) passive visual counts and qualitative observations of larval Nooksack Dace habitat use and mortality rates over time; 2) laboratory testing of temperature effects on growth of larval Nooksack Dace; and 3) installation of temporary exclosure pens over a three week period to assess ambient predation rates. The specific activities authorized by this permit include: 1. Capture of larval Nooksack Dace wi ...
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#21-PPAC-00016 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2021-06-01)
    Activities will consist of the following: i. Northern Abalone will be counted and their shell length will be measured underwater by SCUBA divers using calipers ii. Most Northern Abalone will be measured in place iii. For Northern Abalone that must be removed from the substrate to enable proper measurement of shell length (e.g., found in a crevice), divers will use legs of the Sunflower Star (Pycnopodia helianthoides) to induce an escape res ...
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#21-PPAC-00017 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2021-06-01)
    a) Capture, using setlines, wild and hatchery-origin adult White Sturgeon annually for mark-recapture study. Implant annually up to 5 adult White Sturgeon with radio or acoustic transmitters to track their movements and behaviour. All White Sturgeon captured will be assessed (i.e., length, weight, health) and scanned for PIT tags. Previously uncaptured fish will be PIT tagged and fin clipped for genetic sampling. b) Capture, using angling, gill ...
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#21-PPAC-00024 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2021-06-01)
    The permitted activities include: 1. Capture of Salish Suckers in Agassiz Slough, Miami River, Salmon River, and Hopedale Slough watersheds using Feddes and Gee traps. 2. For captured Salish Suckers, administration of anesthesia (MS-222 only; concentration of 70 mg/L), measurement of basic biological information (length, weight and sex), and marking of adults >100 mm with subcutaneous injections of fluorescent elastomer. 3. Recapture of Sal ...
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#21-PPAC-00027 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2021-06-01)
    Activities will consist of collection of approximately 10 deceased Northern Abalone individuals to assess the cause of mortality.
  • >> See more Permits and Related Agreements documents

Policies and Guidelines

Recovery Document Posting Plans

  • Recovery Document Posting Plan - Fisheries and Oceans Canada - Fiscal Year 2016-2017 (2018-09-28)
    Under the Species at Risk Act (SARA), the competent Minister(s) must prepare a recovery strategy within one year of listing a species on Schedule 1 of SARA as endangered and within two years of listing a species as extirpated or threatened. A management plan must be prepared within three years for a species listed as special concern. Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) is accountable for 111 of the 518 species listed under SARA. As of February 20 ...
  • Environment and Climate Change Canada's Three-Year Recovery Document Posting Plan (2016-07-06)
    Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Three-Year Recovery Document Posting Plan identifies the species for which recovery documents will be posted each fiscal year starting in 2014-2015. Posting this three year plan on the Species at Risk Public Registry is intended to provide transparency to partners, stakeholders, and the public about Environment and Climate Change Canada’s plan to develop and post these proposed recovery strategies and manag ...
  • Parks Canada Agency’s Recovery Document Posting Plan (2014-12-23)
    Parks Canada Agency leads the development of recovery strategies and management plans for species at risk that primarily occur on lands and waters the Agency administers. The Agency is also responsible for action planning for all species at risk occurring on these federal lands and waters. Parks Canada Agency will continue its leadership on recovery implementation and protection of species at risk, using a management approach which integrates con ...

Recovery Strategies

  • Recovery Strategy and Action Plan for the Black-tailed Prairie Dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) in Canada (2021-04-12)
    This document has been prepared to meet the requirements under the Species at Risk Act (SARA) of both a recovery strategy and an action plan. As such, it provides both the strategic direction for the recovery of the species as well as the more detailed recovery measures to support this strategic direction, outlining what is required to achieve the objectives. The population and distribution objective is to ensure, by 2040, at least 80% probabilit ...
  • Recovery Strategy for the Macropis Cuckoo Bee (Epeoloides pilosulus) in Canada [Proposed] (2021-04-01)
    The Minister of Environment and Climate Change and Minister responsible for the Parks Canada Agency is the competent minister under SARA for the Macropis Cuckoo Bee and has prepared this recovery strategy, as per section 37 of SARA. To the extent possible, it has been prepared in cooperation with the provinces of Ontario, Quebec, and Nova Scotia, as per section 39(1) of SARA. In light of the current Covid-19 pandemic, the 60-day public comment ...
  • Recovery Strategy (Amended) and Action Plan for the Piping Plover melodus subspecies (Charadrius melodus melodus) in Canada [Proposed] (2021-03-25)
    The Minister of Environment and Climate Change and Minister responsible for the Parks Canada Agency is the competent minister under SARA for the Piping Plover melodus subspecies and has prepared this recovery strategy and action plan, as per sections 37 and 47 of SARA. To the extent possible, it has been prepared in cooperation with the Provinces of Quebec, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia and Newfoundland and Labrador. It was dev ...
  • Recovery Strategy for the Hairy Braya (Braya pilosa) in Canada [Proposed] (2021-03-25)
    The Minister of Environment and Climate Change is the competent minister under SARA for the Hairy Braya and has prepared the federal component of this recovery strategy (Part 1), as per section 37 of SARA. To the extent possible, it has been prepared in cooperation with the Government of the Northwest Territories, the Inuvialuit Land Administration, the Tuktoyaktuk Hunters and Trappers Committee, and the Wildlife Management Advisory Council (Nort ...
  • Recovery Strategy for the Riverine Clubtail (Stylurus amnicola), Great Lakes Plains population, in Canada [Proposed] (2021-03-18)
    The Minister of Environment and Climate Change is the competent minister under SARA for the Riverine Clubtail, Great Lakes Plains population, and has prepared the federal component of this recovery strategy (Part 1), as per Section 37 of SARA. To the extent possible, it has been prepared in cooperation with the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry as per section 39(1) of SARA. SARA section 44 allows the Minister to adopt all or part ...
  • Recovery Strategy for the Showy Goldenrod (Solidago speciosa), Boreal population, in Canada [Proposed] (2021-03-12)
    The Minister of Environment and Climate Change is the competent minister under SARA for the Showy Goldenrod, Boreal population and has prepared the federal component of this recovery strategy (Part 1), as per section 37 of SARA. To the extent possible, it has been prepared in cooperation with the Province of Ontario, as per section 39(1) of SARA. SARA section 44 allows the Minister to adopt all or part of an existing plan for the species if it me ...
  • Recovery Strategy for the Barn Owl (Tyto alba) Eastern Population in Canada [Final version] (2021-03-04)
    The Minister of Environment and Climate Change is the competent minister under SARA for the Barn Owl, Eastern Population, and has prepared this federal component of the recovery strategy, as per section 37 of SARA. To the extent possible, it has been prepared in cooperation with the Province of Ontario (Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry) as per section 39(1) of SARA. SARA section 44 allows the Minister to adopt all or part of an existing ...
  • >> See more Recovery Strategies documents

Regulations

  • Permits Authorizing an Activity Affecting Listed Wildlife Species Regulations (2013-07-03)
    The Jobs, Growth and Long-term Prosperity Act, which received Royal Assent in June 2012, amended the Species at Risk Act (SARA) to, among other things, provide authority for the making of regulations respecting time limits for issuing permits under section 73 of SARA, or for refusing to do so, and specifying the circumstances under which those time limits do not apply. These amendments to SARA are key elements of the Government of Canada’s Respon ...
  • Permits Authorizing an Activity Affecting Listed Wildlife Species Regulations (Proposed) (2013-02-16)
    The Jobs, Growth and Long-term Prosperity Act, which received Royal Assent in June 2012, amended the Species at Risk Act (SARA) to, among other things, provide authority for the making of regulations respecting time limits for issuing permits under section 73 of SARA, or for refusing to do so, and specifying the circumstances under which those time limits do not apply. These amendments to SARA are key elements of the Government of Canada’s Respon ...

Related International Agreements

  • Agreement Between Canada and the U.S. on the Conservation of the Porcupine Caribou Herd (1987-07-17)
    The Porcupine Caribou Herd migrates across the Canada/United States border. The Agreement promotes international co-operation and co-ordination to conserve the herd and its habitat so that the risk of irreversible damage or long-term adverse effects as a result of use of caribou or their habitat is minimized.
  • Agreement on the Conservation of Polar Bears (1981-06-06)
    This Agreement is intended to protect the polar bear as a significant resource of the Arctic region through conservation and management measures, including prohibitions against taking of polar bears, trade in polar bears or polar bear parts, and ecosystem protection measures. There are exemptions from the prohibition in the Agreement including continued harvest by local people using traditional means, scientific research, or for conservation purp ...

Related Information

  • Imminent Threat Assessment for Wood Bison (Bison bison athabascae) (2021-06-08)
    On January 29, 2020, the Minister of Environment and Climate Change announced that he had determined that Wood Bison are facing imminent threats to their recovery. The full imminent threat assessment that supported the Minister’s determination is now available. Edits to Box 1 and Box 2 to better describe the importance of the Ronald Lake and Wabasca herds to Indigenous peoples, were made following the publishing (see links below).
  • Government of Canada’s Approach to Addressing the Imminent Threats to the Recovery of Southern Mountain Caribou (2021-03-18)
    On May 4, 2018, the Minister of Environment and Climate Change announced that the Woodland Caribou, Southern Mountain population (southern mountain caribou) is facing imminent threats to its recovery. As required under subsection 80(2) of the Species at Risk Act, the Minister recommended that an emergency order be made to provide for the protection of the species. The Government of Canada declined the making of an emergency order at this time, an ...
  • Notice of Opportunity for Ministerial Appointment National Aboriginal Council on Species at Risk (NACOSAR) (2021-03-04)
    In the spirit of reconciliation and Indigenous engagement, Environment Climate Change Canada (ECCC) seeks Expressions of Interest from Indigenous women, men and gender-diverse individuals from local, regional, and national forums (including Communities and Bands) to serve as a member of the National Aboriginal Council on Species at Risk (NACOSAR).
  • Imminent Threat Assessment for Wood Bison (Bison bison athabascae) [Superseded] (2021-02-25)
    On January 29, 2020, the Minister of Environment and Climate Change announced that he had determined that Wood Bison are facing imminent threats to their recovery. The full imminent threat assessment that supported the Minister’s determination is now available. Edits to Box 1 and Box 2 to better describe the importance of the Ronald Lake and Wabasca herds to Indigenous peoples, were made following the publishing (see links below).
  • Imminent Threat Assessment for the Spring Salamander (Adirondack / Appalachian population) (2021-01-25)
    The Minister of Environment and Climate Change has determined that the Spring Salamander (Adirondack / Appalachian population) is not facing imminent threats to its survival or recovery.
  • Summary report on comments received on the proposed amended recovery strategy for the Woodland Caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou), Boreal population, in Canada (2020-12-22)
    The proposed Amended Recovery Strategy for the Woodland Caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou), Boreal Population, in Canada was posted on the Species at Risk Public Registry on June 28, 2019, for a 60-day public comment period that ended on August 27, 2019. During the public consultation period, five written comments were received, one from an Indigenous organization and four from industry stakeholders. This document summarizes the engagement proce ...
  • Bank Swallow (Riparia riparia): in sandpits and quarries (2020-09-04)
    The Bank Swallow is a migratory bird species at risk that has lost 98% of its Canadian population over the last 40 years.This insectivorous bird is particularly drawn to sand and gravel pits, stockpiles of sand and soil, and sandy banks along water bodies and roads. Bank Swallows generally dig their burrows in near-vertical banks (slopes of at least 70 degrees) that are more than 2 m high. Bank swallows typically use their nesting sites from mid- ...
  • >> See more Related Information documents

Reports on the Progress of Recovery Document Implementation

Residence Description

  • Description of Residence for Paxton Lake and Vananda Creek Stickleback Species Pairs in Canada (2019-08-21)
    Paxton Lake and Vananda Creek Benthic and Limnetic Sticklebacks build nests within the littoral zone of the lakes in which they are found. These nests are considered residences as defined by the Species at Risk Act SARA.
  • Description of Residence for Vancouver Lamprey (Lampetra macrostoma) in Canada (2019-08-21)
    Vancouver Lamprey construct nests in or near tributary deltas of streams flowing into either Cowichan or Mesachie lakes, or in Cowichan, Bear, or Mesachie lakes themselves.
  • Description of Residence for Bank Swallow (Riparia riparia) in Canada (2019-05-14)
    The following is a description of residence for Bank Swallow (Riparia riparia), created for the purpose of implementing section 33 of the Species at Risk Act (SARA) which relates to the damage or destruction of residences. Such damage or destruction can result from any alteration to the topography, structure, geology, soil conditions, vegetation, chemical composition of air/water, surface or groundwater hydrology, micro-climate, or sound environm ...
  • Description of Residence for Barn Swallow (Hirundo rustica) in Canada (2019-05-14)
    The following is a description of residence for Barn Swallow (Hirundo rustica), created for the purpose of implementing section 33 of the Species at Risk Act (SARA) which relates to the damage or destruction of residences. Such damage or destruction can result from any alteration to the topography, structure, geology, soil conditions, vegetation, chemical composition of air/water, surface or groundwater hydrology, micro-climate, or sound environm ...
  • Residence statement for the Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar), inner Bay of Fundy population (2018-08-23)
    A spawning redd is a residence for Atlantic Salmon, inner Bay of Fundy population (iBoF Salmon). The redd has the structural form and function of a nest and is used for salmon egg incubation, hatching, and the early rearing of hatchlings (alevins). One redd can contain hundreds to several thousands of eggs from a single female salmon. The female salmon constructs the redd during spawning and invests energy in its creation. A redd is typically occ ...
  • Residence Description for the Atlantic Mud-piddock (Barnea truncata) in Canada (2018-07-12)
    The Atlantic Mud-piddock’s burrow is its residence. Once a Mud-piddock larva settles on its preferred red mudstone substrate, it invests energy in creating a burrow that is essential to its survival. The Mud-piddock grows and matures in its burrow. It feeds and releases spawn from within its burrows where it remains for the duration of its adult life stage.
  • Description of Residence for the Western Chorus Frog – Great Lakes, St. Lawrence- Canadian Shield Population (Pseudacris triseriata) in Canada (2016-07-18)
    The following is a description of residence for the Western Chorus Frog, Great Lakes, St. Lawrence – Canadian Shield population (Pseudacris triseriata, hereafter Western Chorus Frog), created for the purpose of implementing section 33 of the Species at Risk Act (SARA) which relates to the damage or destruction of residences. Such damage or destruction can result from any alteration to the topography, geology, soil conditions, vegetation, chemica ...
  • >> See more Residence Description documents

Response Statements

  • Response Statement - Carolina Mantleslug (2020-12-02)
    In Canada, this large terrestrial slug inhabits undisturbed older-growth forests and riparian areas in the Carolinian Forest Region of Ontario, near the northern limit of its global range. The earliest reliable records (1994, 1995) are from two mainland sites in southwestern Ontario and Pelee Island. Recent searches have confirmed only a small number of additional sites within this small range. Suitable habitat in Canada has experienced historica ...
  • Response Statement - Chestnut-collared Longspur (2020-12-02)
    This striking grassland songbird is only found on North America&rsquo;s Great Plains. It has experienced a population decline of more than 50% over the past decade, and about 95% since 1970. The Canadian breeding range has contracted to the south and west since the 1970s. The primary threat is degradation and fragmentation of native grasslands, especially through conversion to agriculture. Ongoing loss of habitat in the core wintering region of n ...
  • Response Statement - Coastrange Sculpin, Cultus Lake population (2020-12-02)
    This small-bodied freshwater fish is found in a single lake that drains into the lower Fraser River, in southwestern British Columbia. This area is undergoing increasing urbanization and recreational use. Every night, this unique population migrates from the lake bottom toward the lake surface to feed. A recent introduction of an exotic predator, Smallmouth Bass, is a serious concern to the long term persistence of the sculpin. The species is als ...
  • Response Statement - Columbia Sculpin (2020-12-02)
    This small freshwater fish is endemic to the Columbia River watershed in southern British Columbia where it has a small geographic distribution. It is a bottom-dwelling and sedentary fish as an adult, affected by multiple past impacts and ongoing threats. It is particularly susceptible to declines in habitat area and quality from drought and changes in water flow resulting from water management and climate change, in addition to pollution and inv ...
  • Response Statement - Gillman's Goldenrod (2020-12-02)
    This perennial plant species is a Great Lakes endemic now found in Canada only on one island off the south shore of Manitoulin Island in Lake Huron. The species is threatened by habitat disturbance caused by invasive plants.
  • Response Statement - Great Basin Spadefoot (2020-12-02)
    This toad-like amphibian is one of a suite of grassland and open woodland species restricted to the arid southern interior of British Columbia. It prefers to breed in temporary waterbodies, and requires terrestrial habitats with loose, friable soils for refuge from freezing and drought. Frequent widespread droughts in this area result in highly variable breeding success and recruitment among years, causing populations to fluctuate greatly. Curren ...
  • Response Statement - Manitoba Oakworm Moth (2020-12-02)
    This large moth has a small global distribution, most of which is in Canada, and restricted to a small area in southern Manitoba and the adjacent United States. Localized population irruptions occurred irregularly through the 1900s, but their frequency declined and the last one was in 1997; no individuals have been detected since 2000. Threats are primarily related to declines of Bur Oak, its larval host plant. Bur Oak is susceptible to secondary ...
  • >> See more Response Statements documents

Round Table Reports

  • High Level Summary of the SARA Minister's Round Table-November 17, 2014 (2015-03-13)
    The fifth SARA round table was held in Ottawa on November 17, 2014 and involved representatives from government, Aboriginal communities, industry, wildlife management boards, ranchers, hunters and trappers, and non-governmental organizations. The discussion focused on areas where the Federal government can increase collective success in conserving species at risk and improve implementation of SARA. These included Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge ...
  • Brief Overview of the SARA Minister's Round Table 2012 (2012-12-21)
    The Species at Risk Act (SARA) requires that, at least every two years, the federal Minister of the Environment convene a round table of persons interested in matters respecting the protection of wildlife species at risk in Canada.
  • Minister’s 2010 Round Table on the Species at Risk Act (2011-03-02)
    The third SARA round table was held in Gatineau on December 20, 2010 and involved a group of conservation organizations with an interest in the Species at Risk Act including representatives from Nature Canada, WWF Canada, The Nature Conservancy of Canada, Ducks Unlimited Canada, Trout Unlimited Canada, and the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society.
  • Report and Summary of Proceedings: Minister's 2008 Round Table (2009-07-07)
    The second SARA roundtable was held in Ottawa on December 16, 2008 and discussions focused on implementation of the Act to provide the Minister with information that would assist in continuing to improve the implementation of the Act as well as inform him in advance of the 5-year review of the Act. The roundtable discussion involved a subset of stakeholders with an interest in the Species at Risk Act including representatives from: territorial go ...
  • Report on the Minister’s 2006 Round Table under the Species at Risk Act (2007-07-10)
    The first Minister’s round table under the Species at Risk Act (SARA) took place on December 6th and 7th 2006. The objective of the round table was to engage participants in a dialogue about improving the conservation of species and the protection and recovery of species at risk, including the role of SARA therein. The 110 participants at the round table represented a broad cross section of Canadian society and have provided recommendations for c ...
  • Summary of Proceedings: Minister’s 2006 Round Table under the Species at Risk Act (2007-06-22)
    The first Minister’s round table under the Species at Risk Act (SARA) took place on December 6th and 7th 2006. The objective of the round table was to engage participants in a dialogue about improving the conservation of species and the protection and recovery of species at risk, including the role of SARA therein. The 110 participants at the round table represented a broad cross section of Canadian society and have provided recommendations for c ...

Round Table Reports - Minister's Response

  • Response to the Species at Risk Act ministerial roundtable 2019 recommendations (2019-09-05)
    Minister Jonathan Wilkinson and Parliamentary Secretary Sean Fraser, on behalf of Minister Catherine McKenna, are pleased to have convened the Species at Risk Advisory Committee (SARAC), the National Advisory Council on Species at Risk (NACOSAR), and the First Nations Advisory Committee on Species at Risk (FNACSAR) for a comprehensive discussion on the future of conserving species at risk in Canada. The joint participation of all three advisory b ...
  • Round Table on the Species at Risk Act: Response of the Minister of the Environment (2008-04-11)
    This document presents the response of the Minister of the Environment to the recommendations of the First Round Table on the Species at Risk Act (SARA) held in December 2006. The Round Table, attended by 110 participants representing a broad cross section of interested parties, sought to encourage a dialogue among a wide range of groups on how to improve the conservation of species and the protection and recovery of species at risk.

Standards

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