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Response Statements

  • Response Statement - American Water-willow (2022-01-10)
    This aquatic wildflower of lake and river shorelines occurs at 13 sites in southern Ontario and southwestern Quebec. Although still locally numerous, its numbers have declined significantly in the past 10 years, driven by large losses from the Rivière des Mille Îles in Quebec. Declines are mostly attributable to unnaturally severe or prolonged water level fluctuations caused by water level management and climate change. Invasive spec ...
  • Response Statement - Atlantic Mud-piddock (2022-01-10)
    In Canada, this intertidal marine bivalve species is restricted to small sections of Minas Basin in Nova Scotia. Here, the species is entirely dependent on the red-mudstone facies geological formation where it bores into the mudstone and remains as an immobile adult. Changes in sediment deposition can bury habitat, and smother and kill individuals. The main threat to the species is increased frequency and intensity of severe storms due to climate ...
  • Response Statement - Aweme Borer (2022-01-10)
    Until 2009, this moth was known from only a few sites in Canada. Misinterpreted habitat associations and assumptions with known collection sites led to many years of searching inaccurate habitats. In 2015, Bog Buckbean (Menyanthes trifoliata) was confirmed as the larval host plant, the moth’s primary habitat narrowed to fens or peatlands with quaking mats, and it was learned that the larvae live inside the stem, making detection difficult. New re ...
  • Response Statement - Band-tailed Pigeon (2022-01-10)
    This large, fruit-eating pigeon breeds in woodlands of western North and Central America, but in Canada nests only in southwestern British Columbia. Forest harvesting and encroaching urbanization have reduced the quality and extent of its breeding habitat. Most individuals overwinter in the western United States, where they are exposed to habitat loss and hunting and are threatened by an epizootic disease caused by the parasite Trichomonas gallin ...
  • Response Statement - Barn Swallow (2022-01-10)
    This aerial insectivore is among the world’s most widespread birds, with about 6.4 million mature individuals in Canada. It experienced a substantial population decline in North America over more than two decades, beginning in the mid-to-late 1980s. However, the Canadian population has remained largely stable over the past ten years (2009-2019), with a substantial increase in Saskatchewan largely offsetting ongoing declines in several other provi ...
  • Response Statement - Beluga Whale, Cumberland Sound population (2022-01-10)
    This is a small population with a restricted range, heavily reduced by commercial whaling in the past. While whales from this population continue to be harvested for subsistence, recent models suggest that reported removals are not sustainable. There are also concerns related to fishery removals of Greenland Halibut, a prey item for this population of belugas.
  • Response Statement - Beluga Whale, Eastern High Arctic - Baffin Bay population (2022-01-10)
    This population was overexploited in the past, with consequent substantial decline (probably >50%). However, harvests are now likely sustainable and the population appears to have stabilized and may be growing. There is concern that increased vessel traffic facilitated by climate change is changing the nature of the acoustic habitat of this population. The population may fit, or is close to fitting, the criteria for Threatened.
  • Response Statement - Beluga Whale, Eastern Hudson Bay population (2022-01-10)
    The population has declined substantially (about 50%) since 1974 (i.e., over the last 2 generations). The population is still hunted for subsistence, and is at low numbers (ca. 2,600 mature individuals). While harvests have been reduced and the decline in abundance seems to have been halted, current harvest levels are a concern as the primary factor limiting population growth. Noise from increased vessel traffic, particularly in the overwintering ...
  • Response Statement - Beluga Whale, Ungava Bay population (2022-01-10)
    All signs indicate that the population residing in Ungava Bay remains very low and may be extinct. However, it is difficult to definitively conclude that none remain because whales from other populations may visit Ungava Bay during their migration. Unsustainable hunting caused the population decline and it continues in Ungava Bay, posing a threat to any remaining whales.
  • Response Statement - Black Hills Mountainsnail (2022-01-10)
    Globally, this small (shell width about 1 cm) land snail is confined to four mountainous “sky islands” on the Great Plains of North America. In Canada, it occurs only in the Cypress Hills of Alberta and Saskatchewan. Known from this area since 1905, albeit under a different name, this species occurs on ridges, hilltops, cliffs, and slopes at or near the sand, silt, cobbles, and conglomerates of the Cypress Hills Formation. The snails are patchily ...
  • Response Statement - Canada Warbler (2022-01-10)
    This small songbird has 80% of its breeding range in Canada and winters in the northern Andes Mountains. Breeding Bird Survey results show that the long-term decline of the Canadian population began to slow down in 2003 and that numbers have increased steadily since 2012, with an overall growth of 46% over the past decade. However, significant threats persist, most notably clearing of forests in South America for livestock farming and other agric ...
  • Response Statement - Chinook Salmon, East Vancouver Island, Ocean, Fall population (2022-01-10)
    Mature fish in this population return in fall to the east side of Vancouver Island to spawn in multiple rivers from the Goldstream near Victoria north to Campbell River. Five of the six watersheds within the range of this wildlife species are mostly inhabited by hatchery-origin fish. While the overall abundance in the single remaining watershed is increasing, several large-scale hatcheries aim to augment production within the other watersheds and ...
  • Response Statement - Chinook Salmon, East Vancouver Island, Ocean, Summer population (2022-01-10)
    Mature fish in this population return in summer to spawn in the upper reaches of rivers draining the east side of Vancouver Island, from the Koksilah River in the south to the Puntledge River in the north. According to a consensus of expert opinion, fewer than 1000 wild spawners remain in this population. Exploitation rates are relatively high (about 40%), and marine survival estimates have been low for many years. Additional threats include ecos ...
  • Response Statement - Chinook Salmon, Lower Fraser, Ocean, Summer population (2022-01-10)
    Mature fish in this population return in summer and spawn at a single site (Maria Slough), in the lower Fraser River. A continuing decline in spawner abundance is expected as a result of highly modified freshwater and marine habitats, low marine survival and harvest. Failed water control structures and low water levels prevented spawners from accessing the spawning site in 2018. A continuing decline in water quality and quantity is expected due t ...
  • Response Statement - Chinook Salmon, Lower Thompson, Stream, Spring population (2022-01-10)
    Mature fish in this population migrate up the Fraser River in spring to the Thompson River and then into the Nicola, Deadman and Bonaparte rivers to spawn. Marine survival has been low since 2000. There has been a steep decline in the number of mature individuals from 2013 to 2018. This wildlife species faces a number of continuing and severe threats in its freshwater and marine habitat, including post Pine Beetle deforestation, short and long-te ...

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