Species Profile

Lake Chubsucker

Scientific Name: Erimyzon sucetta
Taxonomy Group: Fishes
COSEWIC Range: Ontario
COSEWIC Assessment Date and Status Change: May 2021
COSEWIC Status: Endangered
COSEWIC Status Criteria: A3bce+4bce; B2ab(ii,iii,iv,v)
COSEWIC Reason for Designation: This small sucker species is restricted in Canada to wetlands in southwestern Ontario. It has very specific and narrow habitat preferences, making it is extremely susceptible to habitat changes driven by invasive species, climate change, and agricultural practices. These interacting threats result in increased turbidity and ongoing fragmentation and loss of habitat. In particular, it is suspected that, unless managed effectively, the invasive European Common Reed will rapidly expand and substantially reduce the species’ habitat in a short period of time. Three historical subpopulations have been lost and, of the remaining 10, the relative population status is poor for nine and fair for one. If the threats to these extant sub populations are not managed effectively, loss of individuals and subpopulations will continue.
COSEWIC History of Status Designation: Designated Special Concern in April 1994. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in November 2001. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in November 2008.  Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2021.
SARA Status: Schedule 1, Endangered
Date of Listing (yyyy-mm-dd): 2003-06-05

Please note that this information is provided for general information purposes only. For the most up to date and accurate list of species listed under the Species at Risk Act, please see the Justice Laws Website.

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Quick Links: | Photo | Description | Distribution and Population | Habitat | Biology | Threats | Protection | Other Protection or Status | Recovery Initiatives | Recovery Team | National Recovery Program | Documents

Image of Lake Chubsucker

Lake Chubsucker Photo 1

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Description

The Lake Chubsucker (Erimyzon sucetta) is a member of the Sucker family (Catostomidae) and has the following characteristics: Small in size (usually less than 25 centimeters long); robust and deep body with arched back, greatest depth at base of dorsal fin; blunt snout and small, downward directed, protrusible mouth, typical of suckers; shallowly forked tail; dark olive green dorsal surface and upper sides, golden to silvery lower sides and green yellow to yellow underside; scales on upper half of body are dark-edged giving a cross-hatched appearance in adults; paired fins whitish, dorsal fin and tail olive- coloured in adults; and small nuptial tubercles on the snout and anal fin in adult males.

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Distribution and Population

The Lake Chubsucker is primarily a species of the southeastern United States, but it has two main centers of distribution; the lower coastal plain (Gulf and southeastern Atlantic states), and the southern Great Lakes basin. In Canada, it is known only from the drainages of the Niagara River, and lakes Erie, St. Clair and Huron in southwestern Ontario. This species was not reported in Ontario until 1949, suggesting that it may have always been rare in this area.

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Habitat

Lake Chubsuckers prefer clear, still waters with abundant aquatic plants such as marshes, stagnant bays, floodplain lakes and drainage ditches. Their preferred substrates include gravel, sand and silt mixed with organic debris.

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Biology

Spawning season likely occurs between April and early June in Ontario. Adults move into marshes where females will lay up to 20,000 eggs on submerged vegetation.

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Threats

Increased turbidity, siltation and wetland drainage appear to be the greatest causes of habitat loss for this species.

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Protection

Federal Protection

The Lake Chubsucker is protected under the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA). More information about SARA, including how it protects individual species, is available in the Species at Risk Act: A Guide.

In Canada, this species is currently listed as Endangered under the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA). More information about SARA, including how it protects individual species, is available online at AquaticSpeciesAtRisk.ca or on the SARA Registry at SaraRegistry.gc.ca. The Canada National Parks Act also protects the Lake Chubsucker where it is found in Point Pelee National Park.

Provincial and Territorial Protection

To know if this species is protected by provincial or territorial laws, consult the provinces' and territories' websites.

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Other Protection or Status

Lake Chubsucker is found in Long Point, Pinery, and Rondeau provincial parks. The recovery strategy of the Lake Chubsucker was updated in 2010 to include critical habitat. This species is included within the Ausable River multi-species association and in 2002, the Ausable River Recovery Team was formed to develop an ecosystem-based recovery strategy for the watershed. The team synthesized existing information on four factors: species at risk (population trends, habitat needs and limiting factors), land use, water quality, and stream channel structure. This overview of the river’s health and threats provided a basis for the recovery strategy (draft available at www.abca.on.ca).

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Recovery Initiatives

Status of Recovery Planning

Recovery Strategies :

Name Recovery Strategy for the Lake Chubsucker (Erimyzon sucetta) in Canada
Status Final posting on SAR registry

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Recovery Team

Essex-Erie Recovery Team

  • Shawn Staton - Chair/Contact - Fisheries and Oceans Canada
    Phone: 905-336-4864  Fax: 905-336-6437  Send Email

Ontario Freshwater Fish Recovery Team

  • Amy Boyko - Chair/Contact - Fisheries and Oceans Canada
    Phone: 905-336-6236  Fax: 905-336-6437  Send Email
  • Shawn Staton - Chair/Contact - Fisheries and Oceans Canada
    Phone: 905-336-4864  Fax: 905-336-6437  Send Email

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Documents

PLEASE NOTE: Not all COSEWIC reports are currently available on the SARA Public Registry. Most of the reports not yet available are status reports for species assessed by COSEWIC prior to May 2002. Other COSEWIC reports not yet available may include those species assessed as Extinct, Data Deficient or Not at Risk. In the meantime, they are available on request from the COSEWIC Secretariat.

131 record(s) found.

Reports on the Progress of Recovery Document Implementation

  • Report on the Progress of Recovery Strategy Implementation for the Lake Chubsucker (Erimyzon sucetta) in Canada for the Period 2010 to 2015 (2017-09-25)

    The Lake Chubsucker was initially listed as Threatened in 2003 under the Species at Risk Act (SARA) and was reclassified to Endangered in 2011. The Recovery Strategy for the Lake Chubsucker (Erimyzon sucetta) in Canada was finalized and published on the Species at Risk Public Registry in 2010, before the species was uplisted in 2011. The main threats identified for the Lake Chubsucker include: wetland habitat loss; siltation and turbidity; and, nutrient loading. Additional contributing threats include: channelization/altered water flow; invasive species; incidental harvest; changes to trophic dynamics; barriers to movement; and, climate change.

COSEWIC Status Reports

Response Statements

  • Response Statement - Lake Chubsucker (2009-11-25)

    A species with a restricted geographic Canadian range with small extant populations having very specific and narrow habitat preferences, which are under continued stress.  It is extremely susceptible to habitat change driven by urban, industrial and agricultural practices resulting in increased turbidity.  Two populations have been lost, and of the 11 extant populations, 3 are in serious decline as a result of the continuing and increasing threats posed by agricultural, industrial and urban development that are expected to impact the remaining populations of Lakes Erie and St. Clair.

Recovery Strategies

  • Recovery Strategy for the Lake Chubsucker (Erimyzon sucetta) in Canada (2010-06-04)

    The lake chubsucker is declining throughout most of its range across Canada and the United States. The Canadian range of this species is restricted to southwestern Ontario: the Ausable River, Lake St. Clair, Thames River (Jeanette’s Creek), coastal wetlands of Lake Erie, several tributaries of Big Creek and Niagara rivers (Tee Creek and Lyons Creek). NOTE: A proposed recovery strategy for this species was posted on the SARA Public Registry in September 2007, but did not include the identification of critical habitat; the current document includes critical habitat identification to the extent possible based on the best available information.

Action Plans

  • Action plan for the Ausable River in Canada: an ecosystem approach (2020-03-02)

    The Ausable River, located on the northern edge of the Carolinian Zone in southwestern Ontario, supports one of the most diverse and unique assemblages of aquatic fauna for a watershed of its size in Canada. At least 26 species of freshwater mussels and 85 species of fish have been found here. Many of these species are rare and 12 species, including six mussels and six fishes, have been assessed by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada as Endangered, Threatened or Special Concern. The majority of these species are protected under the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA) and/or the Ontario Endangered Species Act, 2007 (ESA). Five freshwater mussels (Kidneyshell, Northern Riffleshell, Snuffbox, Mapleleaf and Rainbow) and three fishes (Eastern Sand Darter, Lake Chubsucker and Pugnose Shiner) are the focus of this Action Plan. The needs of these at risk fishes and mussels within the Ausable River watershed will be addressed using a multi-species, ecosystem-based approach. The present plan is guided by seven SARA recovery strategies for these eight species and builds on the draft ecosystem-based Ausable River Recovery Strategy that was developed (Shawn Staton, ARRT, unpublished, 2005).
  • Multi-species Action Plan for Point Pelee National Park of Canada and Niagara National Historic Sites of Canada (2016-07-05)

    The Multi-species Action Plan for Point Pelee National Park of Canada and the Niagara National Historic Sites of Canada applies to lands and waters occurring within the boundaries of the two sites: Point Pelee National Park of Canada (PPNP) and the Niagara National Historic Sites of Canada (NNHS). The NNHS is being used as a term to collectively refer to two locations in the Niagara region that consist of three National Historic Sites: Fort George National Historic Site, Battlefield of Fort George National Historic Site, and Butler’s Barracks National Historic Sites of Canada. The plan meets the requirements for action plans set out in the Species At Risk Act (SARA s.47) for species requiring an action plan and that regularly occur in these sites. Measures described in this plan will also provide benefits for other species of conservation concern that regularly occur at PPNP and at NNHS.

Orders

COSEWIC Annual Reports

  • COSEWIC Annual Report - 2009 (2009-08-28)

    2009 Annual Report to the The Minister of the Environment and the Canadian Endangered Species Conservation Council (CESCC) from the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada.
  • COSEWIC Annual Report 2020 to 2021 (2021-10-12)

    Over the past year COSEWIC assessed a total of 66 wildlife species, of which 4 were assigned a status of Not at Risk. Of these 66, COSEWIC re-examined the status of 41 wildlife species; of these, 80% were reassessed at the same or lower level of risk. To date and with the submission of this report, COSEWIC’s assessments now include 826 wildlife species in various risk categories including 369 Endangered, 196 Threatened, 239 Special Concern, and 22 Extirpated (i.e. no longer found in the wild in Canada). In addition, 19 wildlife species have been assessed as Extinct, 62 wildlife species have been designated as Data Deficient, and 202 have been assessed as Not at Risk.

Permits and Related Agreements

  • Explanation for issuing other simliar documents(#19-HCAA-01966 ), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2020-08-25)

    The purpose of this project is to use Round-up (Glyphosate), a herbicide, to manage the control and spread of Phragmites australis as part of an invasive species management plan that is being completed in partnership between the Canadian Wildlife Service, the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry, and the Nature Conservancy of Canada. The project will take place on federal lands where there is a need to control the invasive aquatic reed Phragmites to support wetland rehabilitation, the restoration of fish habitat, and the protection of Spotted Gar (Lepisosteus oculatus), Pugnose Shiner (Notropis anogenus), and Lake Chubsucker (Erimyzon sucetta), all of which all have critical habitat in this area and are protected under the Species at Risk Act. The works include the aerial and ground spraying of herbicides in combination with mechanical removal. According to the proponent, since 2006, Phragmites has increased in coverage inside the Big Creek National Wildlife Area, and at both the Thoroughfare Unit and Squires Ridge of the Long Point National Wildlife Area. The project involves both the spraying of deleterious substances combined with mechanical rolling, resulting in a maximum total footprint of 550,530 m2 of Phragmites removal. The proponent states that this integrated management approach (combining physical management with herbicide application) is consistent with established best management practices for Phragmites control. Based on aerial imaging, a review of the proponent's application and the relevant recovery strategies, it was determined that the fringe/overspray areas would be considered critical habitat. Approximately 35,530 m2 of critical habitat for Spotted Gar, Pugnose Shiner, and Lake Chubsucker will be destroyed and an offsetting plan has been developed that will offset impacts to the critical habitat. The proposed offsetting will result in a minimum of 515,000 m2 of habitat created. This integrated management approach has been applied in the United States for over 40 years and has an established history of success.
  • Explanation for issuing other simliar documents(#20-HCAA-01397 ), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2020-08-21)

    The purpose of this project is to use Round-up, Glyphosate, which is a herbicide used to manage the control and spread of Phragmites australis as part of an invasive species management plan that is being completed by the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry. The project is being completed to support wetland rehabilitation, the restoration of fish habitat, and the protection of Spotted Gar (Lepisosteus oculatus), Pugnose Shiner (Notropis anogenus), and Lake Chubsucker (Erimyzon sucetta) all of which all have critical habitat in this area and are protected under the Species at Risk Act. The project involves both the spraying of deleterious substances combined with mechanical rolling. The proponent states that this integrated management approach (combining physical management with herbicide application) is consistent with established best management practices for Phragmites control. Based on aerial imaging, a review of the proponent's application and the relevant recovery strategies it was determined that 386,170 m2 will be sprayed or mechanically removed below the high water mark and includes the destruction of 67,700 m2 of Spotted Gar, Pugnose Shiner, and Lake Chubsucker critical habitat within the Long Point Crown Marsh.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(# DFO-15-PCAA-00008), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2015-04-10)

    This is an annual young-of-year (YOY) index survey on Lake St. Clair that has been carried out intermittently since 1979. This program is used to assess YOY abundance and diversity of key economically and ecologically important species in addition to the nearshore fish community composition and abundance. Fixed sites on the lake allow changes in community structure to be tracked, relative abundance and presence of aquatic invasive fish through time.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(# DFO-15-PCAA-00024), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2015-07-01)

    The objective is to sample Round Goby for both behavioural and genomic assays. The source site will be St. Claire River near Sarnia, where the Round Goby was initially found and assumed to be the first longest established site. The established sites will be the river mouths and the invasion fronts will be determined by methods from Bronnenhuber et al. (2011).
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#17-PCAA-00001), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2017-03-10)

    The St. Clair Region Conservation Authority (SCRCA) is sampling fish and mussels in several locations for presence/absence data. Currently, fish and mussel data is lacking in these areas. Baseline data will be collected to assist in future project proposals and inquiries. Benthic sampling will be undertaken for watershed characterization to allow the SCRCA to assess water quality throughout the watershed. Data obtained will assist the SCRCA in the identification of potential rehabilitation sites and impact monitoring.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#17-PCAA-00004), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2017-03-29)

    The objective of the project is to apply selective lampricide to assess and control Sea Lamprey populations in the Great Lakes. Assessment surveys are routinely conducted in tributaries and lentic areas to determine the presence, distribution, and abundance of Sea Lamprey larvae. In deep water (>0.8 m) areas, surveys are conducted with the application of granular Bayluscide, a bottom-release formulation of lampricide, within the demarcated boundaries of the plots with a standard area of 500 m2. Tributaries harbouring larval Sea Lamprey are treated periodically with lampricides to eliminate or reduce larval populations before they recruit to the lake as feeding juveniles. The treatment units administer and analyze TFM, or TFM/Niclosamide mixtures (TFM augmented with Bayluscide 70% wettable powder or 20% emulsifiable concentrate) during stream treatments, and apply 3.2% granular Bayluscide (gB) to control populations inhabiting lentic areas.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#17-PCAA-00005), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2017-04-06)

    The purpose of the activity is early detection surveillance sampling for Asian carps. Sampling is planned for near shore and tributaries throughout the Canadian waters of the Great Lakes basin. A total of 36 early detection sites have been selected in the Great Lakes basin. Combinations of sampling gears are deployed at each site in order in target all life-stages of Asian carps. A community assessment of the fishes present in the areas is collected. Field sampling techniques include a combination of passive and active fish sampling gears. A combination of gear types has proven to be the most effective method for detecting the majority of fishes in a specific habitat type.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#17-PCAA-00006), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2017-04-07)

    This is an annual young-of-year (YOY) index survey of Lake St. Clair that has been carried out intermittently since 1979. This program is used to assess YOY abundance and diversity of key economically and ecologically important species in addition to the nearshore fish community composition and abundance. Fixed sites on the lake allow changes in the community structure relative abundances and presences of aquatic invasive species and species at risk to be tracked through time. Collection is carried out using a 30' long 1/8" mesh beach scene in 2m of water or less during daylight hours. Seine hauls are carried out perpendicular to the shore and are approximately 30m in length. Captured fishes are identified, enumerated and released on site.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#17-PCAA-00010), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2017-04-10)

    The goal of this research is to assess the status of freshwater fishes in southwestern Ontario wetlands in order to inform the management, conservation, and restoration of these systems. Wetlands in will be surveyed to assemble fish community data and assess the status of fishes at risk in these regions. Eight weeks of fieldwork in wetlands throughout southwestern Ontario will be completed in the summer of 2017. The eight weeks of fieldwork will include seining and mini fyke nets.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#17-PCAA-00011), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2017-04-10)

    This is a monitoring project to investigate the use and suitability of newly created wetland sites at Crown Marsh; sampling will occur annually. Study design permits characterization of successional changes. Each summer, fishes are sampled by five hauls of a bag seine within a 75 m2 area, enclosed by a block-net. At each site, fish and macrophyte sampling take place at 10 randomly selected points. Visual estimates are used to characterize aquatic macrophyte species composition and submersed plant coverage. The same sampling methods will be applied to: 1) inventory fishes in currently isolated ponds; and, 2) characterize changes to fish assemblage composition over a three-year period after isolated ponds are connected to Long Point Bay.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-HCAA-00158 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-08-07)

    Phragmites australis is an invasive species that is expanding exponentially in Long Point Bay displacing native species and limiting critical habitat for numerous species at risk. A method that has been used in the United States but is relatively new to Canada includes applying a custom made herbicide, RoundUp (active ingredient glyphosate), with AquaSurf (a surfactant), which has been shown to be effective at reducing Phragmites density and spread. This project is an extension of the works that the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (OMNRF) has conducted in 2016, 2017 and 2018 and is proposed for 2019 in Long Point Bay and Rondeau Bay as part of a 5-year pilot project to determine the effectiveness of this method in Canada. The current proposal is to treat a total of 9.7 hectares in the following locations in Long Point Bay by ground application: Otter Pond (0.4 ha), Long Pond (4 ha), and Brown's Marsh (5.3 ha). This activity may result in the incidental harm, harassment, or death of Pugnose Shiner (Notropis anogenus), Lake Chubsucker (Erimyzon sucetta), Eastern Pondmussel (Ligumia nasuta), Rainbow (Villosa iris), Spotted Gar (Lepisosteus oculatus), or Eastern Sand Darter (Ammocrypta pellucida) (Ontario populations) resulting from the application of herbicide, use of heavy equipment for spraying by ground, or oxygen depletion from vegetative die-off.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-HCAA-00343 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2020-04-16)

    This activity consists of a culvert replacement of an existing 15 m by 2.5 m by 2.1 m concrete culvert under the road with a new steel polymer 18 m by 2.5 m by 2.1 m coated pipe arch culvert in Maxwell Creek (East), Ontario. The culvert will be embedded and allowed to naturally silt over. Rip-rap slope protection will be installed at each end. These culvert replacement works requires the use of a cofferdam for the duration of in-water works (maximum five weeks). This will require a fish rescue, which could result in the incidental harm, capture, and harassment of Lake Chubsucker (Erimyzon sucetta) and Pugnose Minnow (Opsopoeodus emiliae) in the work area during site isolation and fish rescue operations.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-HCAA-00700 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-08-06)

    Phragmites australis is an invasive species that is expanding exponentially in Long Point Bay and Rondeau Bay, displacing native species and limiting critical habitat for numerous species at risk. A method that has been used in the United States but is relatively new to Canada includes applying a custom made herbicide, RoundUp (active ingredient glyphosate), with AquaSurf (a surfactant), which has been shown to be effective at reducing Phragmites density and spread. This project is an extension of the works that the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (OMNRF) conducted in 2016, 2017 and 2018 in Long Point Bay and Rondeau Bay as part of a 5-year pilot project to determine the effectiveness of this method in Canada. The current proposal is to treat a total of 48 hectares in the following locations in Rondeau Bay and Long Point Bay by ground application: Rondeau Provincial Park (10 ha), Long Point Bay (5 ha), Turkey Point Region (1 ha), Lower Big Creek Marshes (6 ha), Big Creek Watershed (20 ha), North Shore of the Inner Bay (6 ha), and as required where regrowth is observed in Long Point Bay. This activity may result in the incidental harm, harassment, or death of Eastern Pondmussel (Ligumia nasuta), Round Pigtoe (Pleurobema sintoxia), Lake Chubsucker (Erimyzon sucetta), Pugnose Shiner (Notropis anogenus), Kidneyshell (Ptychobranchus fasciolaris), Rainbow (Villosa iris), Round Hickorynut (Obovaria subrotunda), Mapleleaf (Great Lakes - Upper St. Lawrence River populations) (Quadrula quadrula), Spotted Gar (Lepisosteus oculatus), or Eastern Sand Darter (Ammocrypta pellucida) (Ontario populations) resulting from the application of herbicide, use of heavy equipment for spraying by ground, or oxygen depletion from vegetative die-off.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-PCAA-00001 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-02-06)

    The Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (OMNRF) is conducting a fish community survey in the Inner Long Point Bay of Lake Erie in March to May of 2019. This is a new program and is anticipated to take place annually. The gear used will be 4' hoop nets at 36 sites. Net sets will be 24 hours long. All species captured during the study will be identified, counted, and a subset measured for total length (up to 20 individuals). There is a spring commercial hoop net fishery in the Inner Bay and OMNRF wishes to perform an independent survey using the same gear during the same time period. It is probable that an at-risk species will be captured during the survey. However, it is expected that there will be minimal impacts on species at risk (SAR) populations because the gear being used is non-lethal, and captured fishes will be live released back into the lake at the site of capture. These activities may result in the incidental harm, harassment or death of the species listed on the permit resulting from capture, processing, and release.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-PCAA-00011), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-04-29)

    The objectives of the activities covered by this permit are to conduct fish and mussel surveys in the St. Clair River watershed and the Lake St. Clair watershed. Collected baseline data will be used to assist in future project proposals and inquiries. The activities authorized by this permit consist of the capture of any of the species listed on this permit from the St. Clair River watershed and the Lake St. Clair watershed, which will require the handling of any of the species listed on this permit for the purposes of identification and processing (count, photograph, etc.). Fishes will be released alive with the exception of some smaller fishes that may be retained to confirm identification. All mussels will be returned alive to the locations they were found. Sampling will be completed through the use of a backpack electrofishing unit, seine net, or minnow traps where necessary, using the Ontario Stream Assessment Protocol (OSAP). Mussel surveys will adhere to Mackie et al. (2008).
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-PCAA-00015 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-06-10)

    The objectives of the activities covered by the permit are to conduct fish community monitoring in the Lake St. Clair National Wildlife Area (NWA), to: 1) understand fish community composition and structure (e.g., relative abundance of forage fishes, predators, or invasive fishes); 2) quantify fish habitat attributes (e.g., dominant macrophyte species, water conductivity and dissolved oxygen); and, 3) enumerate the population abundance of Lake Chubsucker (Erimyzon sucetta) and Pugnose Shiner (Notropis anogenus). Surveys will occur in late August or early September. The activities authorized by the permit consist of: 1. The capture of Lake Chubsucker and Pugnose Shiner from the St. Clair NWA using fyke nets. It is anticipated that 30 fyke net sets/week in each cell will be sampled; 2. The handling of Lake Chubsucker and Pugnose Shiner for the purposes of identification and processing (count, measure, photograph, etc.). With the exception of vouchers that may be retained to confirm identification, all fishes will be released alive after processing. Vouchers will be collected using digital cameras but some vouchers of smaller fishes may be retained, in 10% formalin, to confirm identification (if digital vouchers cannot be collected); and, 3. The possession and transport of any dead Lake Chubsucker and/or Pugnose Shiner killed incidentally or for vouchering purposes, preserved in 10% formalin.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-PCAA-00018), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-05-13)

    The objectives of the activities covered by the permit are to conduct a survey for Pugnose Minnow (Opsopoeodus emiliae) in southwestern Ontario waterbodies. This survey would consist of seining wadeable habitats with bag seines and non-wadeable habitats with boat seines. Sampling may result in the incidental capture of the species listed on the permit. The activities authorized by the permit consist of the incidental capture of Channel Darter (Percina copelandi) (Lake Erie populations), Eastern Sand Darter (Ammocrypta pellucida) (Ontario populations), Lake Chubsucker (Erimyzon sucetta), Northern Madtom (Noturus stigmosus) and/or Pugnose Shiner (Notropis anogenus) from the locations listed on the permit using bag and/or boat seine nets. Identification and processing (count, measure, photograph, etc.) will require the handling of the species listed on the permit. With the exception of vouchers that may be retained to confirm identification, all fishes will be released alive after processing. Vouchers will be collected using digital cameras but some vouchers of smaller fishes may be retained, in 10% formalin, to confirm identification (if digital vouchers cannot be collected).
  • >> See more Permits and Related Agreements documents

Consultation Documents

Critical Habitat Descriptions in the Canada Gazette

Critical Habitat Orders

  • Critical Habitat of the Lake Chubsucker (Erimyzon sucetta) Order (2018-07-25)

    The long-term recovery goal (greater than 20 years) set out in the Recovery Strategy for the Lake Chubsucker (Erimyzon sucetta) in Canada is to maintain current populations of the Lake Chubsucker and to restore viable populations to formerly occupied wetland habitats. Efforts to achieve this recovery goal are ongoing and involve a number of recovery objectives outlined in the Recovery Strategy for the Lake Chubsucker (Erimyzon sucetta) in Canada. Threats to this species include siltation, increased turbidity, nutrient loading, and loss of its preferred wetland habitat (clear, still, well-vegetated waters) through habitat alteration, channelization, wetland drainage, pollution, changes to rates of flow, and possibly exotic species and climate change. In Southwestern Ontario, the leading causes of habitat loss for this species appear to be the draining of wetlands, as well as siltation and nutrient loading due to agricultural practices. Protection of critical habitat is an important component aimed at ensuring the recovery of the Lake Chubsucker, particularly given its extremely limited distribution in Canada.

Exceptions

  • Public Registry Notice for s.83 Exceptions - Former Camp Ipperwash (2015-03-06)

    As per the Memorandum of Understanding between DND, Environment Canada, and the Parks Canada Agency: 6.1 c) Activities occurring on Defence Establishments that are considered necessary for public safety in accordance with paragraph a) and authorized under the National Defence Act and the Explosives Act are: Remediation of contaminated sites; and Securing, handling, destruction or disposal of unsafe munitions, including unexploded explosive ordnance.

Recovery Document Posting Plans

  • Recovery Document Posting Plan - Fisheries and Oceans Canada - Fiscal Year 2016-2017 (2018-09-28)

    Under the Species at Risk Act (SARA), the competent Minister(s) must prepare a recovery strategy within one year of listing a species on Schedule 1 of SARA as endangered and within two years of listing a species as extirpated or threatened. A management plan must be prepared within three years for a species listed as special concern. Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) is accountable for 111 of the 518 species listed under SARA. As of February 2016, proposed recovery strategies, management plans and action plans for 57 of those species have not yet been posted to the Species at Risk Public Registry. An additional 23 aquatic species have proposed management or action plans coming due in the future. The following outlines the Department’s plan for posting proposed documents for 64 species on the Species at Risk Public Registry. The Department has a plan to post recovery strategies for 9 species, management plans for 13 species, and action plans for 42 species over the next year. Original publication of the Recovery Document Posting Plan: 2016-05-02
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