Species Profile

Yelloweye Rockfish Pacific Ocean inside waters population

Scientific Name: Sebastes ruberrimus
Taxonomy Group: Fishes
COSEWIC Range: British Columbia, Pacific Ocean
COSEWIC Assessment Date and Status Change: November 2020
COSEWIC Status: Threatened
COSEWIC Status Criteria: Meets criteria for Endangered, A2bd+4bd, but designated Threatened, A2bd+4bd, because the species is not at risk of imminent extirpation.
COSEWIC Reason for Designation: This marine fish is an important component of near shore rocky reef waters within the Strait of Georgia on the west coast of British Columbia. This population is important to commercial and recreational fisheries, and it is culturally significant for Aboriginal communities. New analyses since the last assessment determined that the population has declined dramatically over the last 100 years and indicate the conservation risk is greater than previously assessed. Due to its relatively slow growth, late age of maturity, and territorial behaviour, this population is slow to recover once depleted. However, the population is not in imminent danger of extinction because survey data indicate the population has been stable for 20 years (0.5 generation), population abundance is near sustainable levels, and long-term projections are stable. Ongoing threats from pervasive ecosystem modifications and climate change remain.
COSEWIC History of Status Designation: Designated Special Concern in November 2008. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in November 2020.
SARA Status: Schedule 1, Special Concern
Date of Listing (yyyy-mm-dd): 2011-06-23

Please note that this information is provided for general information purposes only. For the most up to date and accurate list of species listed under the Species at Risk Act, please see the Justice Laws Website.

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Protection

Federal Protection

The Yelloweye Rockfish, Pacific Ocean inside waters population, is protected under the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA). More information about SARA, including how it protects individual species, is available in the Species at Risk Act: A Guide.

Provincial and Territorial Protection

To know if this species is protected by provincial or territorial laws, consult the provinces' and territories' websites.

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Documents

PLEASE NOTE: Not all COSEWIC reports are currently available on the SARA Public Registry. Most of the reports not yet available are status reports for species assessed by COSEWIC prior to May 2002. Other COSEWIC reports not yet available may include those species assessed as Extinct, Data Deficient or Not at Risk. In the meantime, they are available on request from the COSEWIC Secretariat.

10 record(s) found.

COSEWIC Status Reports

Response Statements

  • Response Statement - Yelloweye Rockfish, Pacific Ocean inside waters population (2009-11-25)

    This species is one of an inshore rockfish complex which is exploited by commercial, recreational and Aboriginal fisheries.  Life history characteristics make the species particularly susceptible to human-caused mortality, with a maximum recorded age of 120 yr and generation time estimated at 66 yr. Fishery-independent surveys over the past 20 yr do not show significant declines, while declines over 19 yr in commercial catch per unit effort are not believed to represent abundance accurately. Commercial catch quotas have been reduced and restrictions on harvesting are expected to keep catches low in future; in addition, areas have been closed to commercial and recreational fishing. A designation of Special Concern is consistent with the life history characteristics and probable continued removals in fisheries.   
  • Response Statement - Yelloweye Rockfish, Pacific Ocean inside waters population (2022-01-10)

    This marine fish is an important component of near shore rocky reef waters within the Strait of Georgia on the west coast of British Columbia. This population is important to commercial and recreational fisheries, and it is culturally significant for Aboriginal communities. New analyses since the last assessment determined that the population has declined dramatically over the last 100 years and indicate the conservation risk is greater than previously assessed. Due to its relatively slow growth, late age of maturity, and territorial behaviour, this population is slow to recover once depleted. However, the population is not in imminent danger of extinction because survey data indicate the population has been stable for 20 years (0.5 generation), population abundance is near sustainable levels, and long-term projections are stable. Ongoing threats from pervasive ecosystem modifications and climate change remain.

Management Plans

  • Management Plan for the Yelloweye Rockfish (Sebastes ruberrimus) in Canada (2021-01-29)

    Yelloweye Rockfish (Sebastes ruberrimus, Inside and Outside waters populations) was listed as a species of Special Concern under the Species at Risk Act (SARA) in July 2011. Yelloweye Rockfish belong to the family Sebastidae and are easily identified by their vibrant orange to red colouration and bright yellow eyes. Yelloweye Rockfish are one of the largest rockfish species, reaching a maximum recorded length of 91 cm and weight of 11.3 kg, but with an average length of approximately 66 cm in British Columbia (BC). This species is also long-lived – the maximum recorded age of Yelloweye Rockfish in BC is 115 years, while the global maximum recorded age is 118 years. Yelloweye Rockfish are referred to by many names including red snapper, red rock cod, rasphead rockfish, red rockfish, red cod, goldeneye rockfish, and turkey rockfish.

Orders

COSEWIC Annual Reports

  • COSEWIC Annual Report - 2009 (2009-08-28)

    2009 Annual Report to the The Minister of the Environment and the Canadian Endangered Species Conservation Council (CESCC) from the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada.
  • COSEWIC Annual Report 2020 to 2021 (2021-10-12)

    Over the past year COSEWIC assessed a total of 66 wildlife species, of which 4 were assigned a status of Not at Risk. Of these 66, COSEWIC re-examined the status of 41 wildlife species; of these, 80% were reassessed at the same or lower level of risk. To date and with the submission of this report, COSEWIC’s assessments now include 826 wildlife species in various risk categories including 369 Endangered, 196 Threatened, 239 Special Concern, and 22 Extirpated (i.e. no longer found in the wild in Canada). In addition, 19 wildlife species have been assessed as Extinct, 62 wildlife species have been designated as Data Deficient, and 202 have been assessed as Not at Risk.

Recovery Document Posting Plans

  • Recovery Document Posting Plan - Fisheries and Oceans Canada - Fiscal Year 2016-2017 (2018-09-28)

    Under the Species at Risk Act (SARA), the competent Minister(s) must prepare a recovery strategy within one year of listing a species on Schedule 1 of SARA as endangered and within two years of listing a species as extirpated or threatened. A management plan must be prepared within three years for a species listed as special concern. Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) is accountable for 111 of the 518 species listed under SARA. As of February 2016, proposed recovery strategies, management plans and action plans for 57 of those species have not yet been posted to the Species at Risk Public Registry. An additional 23 aquatic species have proposed management or action plans coming due in the future. The following outlines the Department’s plan for posting proposed documents for 64 species on the Species at Risk Public Registry. The Department has a plan to post recovery strategies for 9 species, management plans for 13 species, and action plans for 42 species over the next year. Original publication of the Recovery Document Posting Plan: 2016-05-02
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