Species Profile

Eastern Sand Darter Ontario populations

Scientific Name: Ammocrypta pellucida
Taxonomy Group: Fishes
COSEWIC Range: Ontario
COSEWIC Assessment Date and Status Change: November 2009
COSEWIC Status: Threatened
COSEWIC Status Criteria: B2ab(i,iii,iv,v)
COSEWIC Reason for Designation: This species prefers sand bottom areas of lakes and streams in which it burrows. There is continuing decline in the already small and fragmented populations; four (of 11) have probably been extirpated.  The extent of occurrence of this species in Ontario is approximately half of what it was in the 1970s as a result of habitat loss and degradation from increasing urban and agricultural development, stream channelization and competition with invasive alien species.
COSEWIC History of Status Designation: The species was considered a single unit and designated Threatened in April 1994 and November 2000. When the species was split into separate units in November 2009, the "Ontario populations" unit was designated Threatened.
SARA Status: Schedule 1, Threatened
Date of Listing (yyyy-mm-dd): 2003-06-05

Please note that this information is provided for general information purposes only. For the most up to date and accurate list of species listed under the Species at Risk Act, please see the Justice Laws Website.

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Eastern Sand Darter Photo 1

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Protection

Federal Protection

The Eastern Sand Darter, Ontario populations, is protected under the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA). More information about SARA, including how it protects individual species, is available in the Species at Risk Act: A Guide.

Provincial and Territorial Protection

To know if this species is protected by provincial or territorial laws, consult the provinces' and territories' websites.

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Recovery Initiatives

Status of Recovery Planning

Recovery Strategies :

Name Recovery Strategy for the Eastern Sand Darter (Ammocrypta pellucida) in Canada: Ontario Populations
Status Final posting on SAR registry

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Documents

PLEASE NOTE: Not all COSEWIC reports are currently available on the SARA Public Registry. Most of the reports not yet available are status reports for species assessed by COSEWIC prior to May 2002. Other COSEWIC reports not yet available may include those species assessed as Extinct, Data Deficient or Not at Risk. In the meantime, they are available on request from the COSEWIC Secretariat.

126 record(s) found.

Reports on the Progress of Recovery Document Implementation

COSEWIC Status Reports

COSEWIC Assessments

  • COSEWIC Assessment Summary and Status Report: Eastern Sand Darter – Ontario and Quebec populations Ammocrypta pellucida (2010-09-03)

    Assessment Summary – November 2009 Common name Eastern Sand Darter – Ontario populations Scientific name Ammocrypta pellucida Status Threatened Reason for designation This species prefers sand bottom areas of lakes and streams in which it burrows. There is continuing decline in the already small and fragmented populations; four (of 11) have probably been extirpated. The extent of occurrence of this species in Ontario is approximately half of what it was in the 1970s as a result of habitat loss and degradation from increasing urban and agricultural development, stream channelization and competition with invasive alien species. Occurrence Ontario Status history The species was considered a single unit and designated Threatened in April 1994 and November 2000. When the species was split into separate units in November 2009, the "Ontario populations" unit was designated Threatened. Assessment Summary – November 2009 Common name Eastern Sand Darter – Quebec populations Scientific name Ammocrypta pellucida Status Threatened Reason for designation This species prefers sand bottom areas of lakes and streams in which it burrows. There is continuing decline in the already small and fragmented populations; three (of 18) have probably been extirpated, and the fate of five others is unknown due to lack of recent sampling. The extent of occurrence of this species in Québec is approximately two–thirds of what it was in the 1970s, despite records at five new sites in two locations. There is continuing habitat loss and degradation from historic and ongoing urban and agricultural development, stream channelization and competition with invasive alien species. Occurrence Quebec Status historyThe species was considered a single unit and designated Threatened in April 1994 and November 2000. When the species was split into separate units in November 2009, the "Quebec populations" unit was designated Threatened.

Response Statements

  • Response Statement - Eastern Sand Darter, Ontario populations (2010-12-02)

    This species prefers sand bottom areas of lakes and streams in which it burrows. There is continuing decline in the already small and fragmented populations; four (of 11) have probably been extirpated.  The extent of occurrence of this species in Ontario is approximately half of what it was in the 1970s as a result of habitat loss and degradation from increasing urban and agricultural development, stream channelization and competition with invasive alien species.

Recovery Strategies

  • Recovery Strategy for the Eastern Sand Darter (Ammocrypta pellucida) in Canada: Ontario Populations (2012-10-19)

    The Eastern Sand Darter is a small benthic and translucent fish whose North American range is discontinuous and composed of two disjunct areas. One element occurs in the Great Lakes and Ohio River drainage, while the other occurs in Lake Champlain and the St. Lawrence River. In Ontario, it has been recently collected in Lake Erie, Lake St. Clair, the Grand, Sydenham and Thames rivers, and Big Creek. There are limited data available on the Eastern Sand Darter throughout its Canadian range. Nevertheless, the data that are available suggest that Eastern Sand Darter populations are declining throughout their entire range. In Canada, total numbers have been declining since 1950. The silting of sandy habitats represents the main cause for the decline in abundance and range of Eastern Sand Darter. Threats to Canadian populations include: sediment loading, nutrient loading and pollution resulting from agricultural and urban development.  Barriers to movement (e.g. dams and impoundments) and alterations in flow regimes and coastal processes negatively affect the Eastern Sand Darter Invasive species, such as the Round Goby, may also be negatively impacting the species.

Action Plans

  • Action plan for the Ausable River in Canada: an ecosystem approach (2020-03-02)

    The Ausable River, located on the northern edge of the Carolinian Zone in southwestern Ontario, supports one of the most diverse and unique assemblages of aquatic fauna for a watershed of its size in Canada. At least 26 species of freshwater mussels and 85 species of fish have been found here. Many of these species are rare and 12 species, including six mussels and six fishes, have been assessed by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada as Endangered, Threatened or Special Concern. The majority of these species are protected under the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA) and/or the Ontario Endangered Species Act, 2007 (ESA). Five freshwater mussels (Kidneyshell, Northern Riffleshell, Snuffbox, Mapleleaf and Rainbow) and three fishes (Eastern Sand Darter, Lake Chubsucker and Pugnose Shiner) are the focus of this Action Plan. The needs of these at risk fishes and mussels within the Ausable River watershed will be addressed using a multi-species, ecosystem-based approach. The present plan is guided by seven SARA recovery strategies for these eight species and builds on the draft ecosystem-based Ausable River Recovery Strategy that was developed (Shawn Staton, ARRT, unpublished, 2005).
  • Action Plan for the Sydenham River in Canada: An Ecosystem Approach (2018-05-24)

    The Sydenham River in southwestern Ontario supports an amazing diversity of aquatic life. Located in the lower Great Lakes basin, the river contains the greatest diversity of freshwater mussel species of any watershed in Canada. At least 34 species of mussels and 80 species of fishes have been found here. Many of these species are rare and seventeen species, including eleven mussels and six fishes, have been assessed by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) as Endangered, Threatened or Special Concern. The majority of these species are protected under the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA) and seven freshwater mussels (Round Hickorynut, Kidneyshell, Northern Riffleshell, Snuffbox, Round Pigtoe, Rayed Bean and Salamander Mussel) and two fishes (Eastern Sand Darter – Ontario population and Northern Madtom) are the focus of this action plan. The needs of these at risk fishes and mussels within the Sydenham River watershed will be addressed using a multi-species, ecosystem-based approach. The present plan is guided by four SARA recovery strategies for these nine species and builds on the ecosystem-based Sydenham River Recovery Strategy completed in 2003.

Orders

  • Order Acknowledging Receipt of the Assessments Done Pursuant to Subsection 23(1) of the Act(volume 146, number 14, 2012) (2012-07-04)

    His Excellency the Governor General in Council, on the recommendation of the Minister of the Environment, acknowledges receipt, on the making of this Order, of the assessments done pursuant to subsection 23(1) of the Species at Risk Act by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) with respect to the species set out in the annexed schedule.
  • Order Amending Schedule 1 to the Species at Risk Act (volume 147, number 7, 2013) (2013-03-27)

    This Order adds seven aquatic species to Schedule 1 of the Species at Risk Act (SARA) and reclassifies two species on Schedule 1 of SARA (Schedule 1). This Order also amends Schedule 1 by striking out one species previously listed as a single designatable unit and adding two new designatable units of the same species in its place. One designatable unit of a terrestrial species, currently also listed as part of a broader designatable unit, is struck out to eliminate duplication. These amendments are being made on the recommendation of the Minister of the Environment with advice from the other competent minister, the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans. A related Order under section 76 of SARA will exempt activities authorized under the Fisheries Act from the prohibitions of SARA for a period of one year for one of the species being added to Schedule 1 (Westslope Cutthroat Trout).

COSEWIC Annual Reports

  • COSEWIC Annual Report - 2010 (2010-09-03)

    Under Canada’s Species At Risk Act (SARA), the foremost function of COSEWIC is to “assess the status of each wildlife species considered by COSEWIC to be at risk and, as part of the assessment, identify existing and potential threats to the species”. During the past year, COSEWIC held two Wildlife Species Assessment Meetings and reviewed the status of 79 wildlife species (species, subspecies, populations). During the meeting of November 2009, COSEWIC assessed or reviewed the classification of the status of 28 wildlife species. COSEWIC assessed or reviewed the classification of an additional 51 wildlife species (species, subspecies and populations) during their April 2010 meeting. For species already found on Schedule 1 of SARA, the classification of 32 species was reviewed by COSEWIC and the status of the wildlife species was confirmed to be in the same category (extirpated - no longer found in the wild in Canada but occurring elsewhere, endangered, threatened or of special concern). The wildlife species assessment results for the 2009-2010 reporting period include the following: Extirpated: 6 Endangered: 39 Threatened: 16 Special Concern: 17 Data Deficient: 1 This report transmits to the Minister the status of 46 species newly classified as extirpated, endangered, threatened or of special concern, fulfilling COSEWIC’s obligations under SARA Section 24 and 25. A full detailed summary of the assessment for each species and the reason for the designation can be found in Appendix I of the attached report. Since its inception, COSEWIC has assessed 602 wildlife species in various risk categories, including 262 Endangered, 151 Threatened, 166 Special Concern and 23 Extirpated. In addition, 13 wildlife species have been assessed as Extinct. Also, to date, 46 wildlife species have been identified by COSEWIC as Data Deficient and 166 wildlife species were assessed as Not at Risk. This year has been a particularly productive year for COSEWIC’s Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge (ATK) Subcommittee. In April 2010 COSEWIC approved the Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge Process and Protocol Guidelines, providing clear and agreed principles for the gathering of Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge to carry out COSEWIC functions as required under Section 15(2) of SARA (See Appendix III of the attached report). We are grateful for the rich and enthusiastic contribution made by community elders and experts in helping the ATK Subcommittee prepare the ATK protocols.

Permits and Related Agreements

  • Explanation for issuing other simliar documents(#DFO-14-HCAA-01831), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2017-05-16)

    The proposed project involves the replacement of the Argyle Street Bridge on the Grand River in Caledonia, Ontario. The existing nine-span bridge will be replaced with a five-span bridge, built adjacent to the existing bridge using piers constructed on temporary work platforms (five causeway pods) to access the existing bridge and install the temporary and permanent bridge piers. Once the new piers are constructed, the replacement bridge will be jacked up and slid over on to the piers and the causeway pods and connector bridges removed.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(# DFO-15-PCAA-00008), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2015-04-10)

    This is an annual young-of-year (YOY) index survey on Lake St. Clair that has been carried out intermittently since 1979. This program is used to assess YOY abundance and diversity of key economically and ecologically important species in addition to the nearshore fish community composition and abundance. Fixed sites on the lake allow changes in community structure to be tracked, relative abundance and presence of aquatic invasive fish through time.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(# DFO-15-PCAA-00024), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2015-07-01)

    The objective is to sample Round Goby for both behavioural and genomic assays. The source site will be St. Claire River near Sarnia, where the Round Goby was initially found and assumed to be the first longest established site. The established sites will be the river mouths and the invasion fronts will be determined by methods from Bronnenhuber et al. (2011).
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#17-PCAA-00001), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2017-03-10)

    The St. Clair Region Conservation Authority (SCRCA) is sampling fish and mussels in several locations for presence/absence data. Currently, fish and mussel data is lacking in these areas. Baseline data will be collected to assist in future project proposals and inquiries. Benthic sampling will be undertaken for watershed characterization to allow the SCRCA to assess water quality throughout the watershed. Data obtained will assist the SCRCA in the identification of potential rehabilitation sites and impact monitoring.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#17-PCAA-00004), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2017-03-29)

    The objective of the project is to apply selective lampricide to assess and control Sea Lamprey populations in the Great Lakes. Assessment surveys are routinely conducted in tributaries and lentic areas to determine the presence, distribution, and abundance of Sea Lamprey larvae. In deep water (>0.8 m) areas, surveys are conducted with the application of granular Bayluscide, a bottom-release formulation of lampricide, within the demarcated boundaries of the plots with a standard area of 500 m2. Tributaries harbouring larval Sea Lamprey are treated periodically with lampricides to eliminate or reduce larval populations before they recruit to the lake as feeding juveniles. The treatment units administer and analyze TFM, or TFM/Niclosamide mixtures (TFM augmented with Bayluscide 70% wettable powder or 20% emulsifiable concentrate) during stream treatments, and apply 3.2% granular Bayluscide (gB) to control populations inhabiting lentic areas.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#17-PCAA-00005), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2017-04-06)

    The purpose of the activity is early detection surveillance sampling for Asian carps. Sampling is planned for near shore and tributaries throughout the Canadian waters of the Great Lakes basin. A total of 36 early detection sites have been selected in the Great Lakes basin. Combinations of sampling gears are deployed at each site in order in target all life-stages of Asian carps. A community assessment of the fishes present in the areas is collected. Field sampling techniques include a combination of passive and active fish sampling gears. A combination of gear types has proven to be the most effective method for detecting the majority of fishes in a specific habitat type.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#17-PCAA-00006), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2017-04-07)

    This is an annual young-of-year (YOY) index survey of Lake St. Clair that has been carried out intermittently since 1979. This program is used to assess YOY abundance and diversity of key economically and ecologically important species in addition to the nearshore fish community composition and abundance. Fixed sites on the lake allow changes in the community structure relative abundances and presences of aquatic invasive species and species at risk to be tracked through time. Collection is carried out using a 30' long 1/8" mesh beach scene in 2m of water or less during daylight hours. Seine hauls are carried out perpendicular to the shore and are approximately 30m in length. Captured fishes are identified, enumerated and released on site.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#17-PCAA-00008), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2017-04-07)

    The Biodiversity Science Section of the Great Lakes Laboratory for Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences will be conducting a survey of larval fishes in the East Sydenham River. This survey will occur at four locations between Alvinston and Dawn Mills, Ontario. This survey will involve placing stationary, larval drift nets into the Sydenham River for timed surveys each day for a period of three months (~12 weeks).
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#18-HCAA-01219 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-11-13)

    This activity involves the infill and dredging of Magnavilla Line Culvert in North Marsh Drain, a Class E drain in the Municipality of Chatham-Kent, to conduct repair of an existing box culvert and the realignment of a drain to address erosion issues around the culvert. The proposal is to install 100 m2 of cofferdams to isolate 810 m2 of the municipal drain. The area will then be dewatered to allow for repairs to the box culvert. The municipal drain will be straightened to align the banks with the existing box culvert, which will result in the dredging and excavation of approximately 180 m2. Following this, 150 m2 of riprap will be installed along the banks and at the inlet and outlet of the culvert. These works will require the relocation of Eastern Sand Darter (Ammocrypta pellucida) (Ontario populations) within the isolated work area of approximately 900 m2 in the North Marsh Drain. The relocation will occur prior to the dewatering and repair of the Magnavilla Line culvert.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-­PCAA-­00021), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-05-17)

    The objectives of the activities covered by the permit are to conduct research to investigate specific temperature thresholds for Eastern Sand Darter (Ammocrypta pellucida) in the Grand and Thames rivers through CT Max trials. Northern Madtom (Noturus stigmosus) may be captured incidentally during work in the Thames River. The activities authorized by the permit consist of the capture of Eastern Sand Darter from the Grand and Thames rivers using a seine net, and the handling of Eastern Sand Darter for the purposes of running CT Max trials. The CT Max trials will utilize a CORIO CD Heating Immersion Circulator. These devices are used to slowly, and precisely, raise the water temperature in large (20 to 100 L) flow­through troughs. These units will be acclimatized to ambient stream temperature before trials begin. Eastern Sand Darter will be placed into the CT Max flow­through troughs located streamside. Once in the trough, the trials will consist of slowly raising the temperature at the international standard of 0.3°C/minute. DFO staff will monitor the fish for two physical responses to thermal stress: 1) Agitation, signifying the temperature threshold at which the fish begin to move rapidly around the holding tank in the search for cooler water, 2) Loss of equilibrium, signifying the temperature at which the fish begin to lose equilibrium (balance) for a period of no more than 10 seconds. Once both physical cues have been documented, the CT Max experiment will cease, and temperatures will be cooled at a rate of 0.3°C/min until the temperature of the stream (or within 5°C) has been reached. At this point, the fish will be removed and placed into a recovery bin of fresh stream water and monitored for a minimum of 30 minutes. After the 30 minute window and once fish have regained equilibrium, they will be placed back into the stream. These activities may result in the incidental capture and handling of Northern Madtom from the Thames River for the purposes of identification and processing (count, measure, photograph etc.), while conducting surveys for Eastern Sand Darter. Any Northern Madtom incidentally captured will be returned alive to the location of capture.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-HCAA-00158 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-08-07)

    Phragmites australis is an invasive species that is expanding exponentially in Long Point Bay displacing native species and limiting critical habitat for numerous species at risk. A method that has been used in the United States but is relatively new to Canada includes applying a custom made herbicide, RoundUp (active ingredient glyphosate), with AquaSurf (a surfactant), which has been shown to be effective at reducing Phragmites density and spread. This project is an extension of the works that the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (OMNRF) has conducted in 2016, 2017 and 2018 and is proposed for 2019 in Long Point Bay and Rondeau Bay as part of a 5-year pilot project to determine the effectiveness of this method in Canada. The current proposal is to treat a total of 9.7 hectares in the following locations in Long Point Bay by ground application: Otter Pond (0.4 ha), Long Pond (4 ha), and Brown's Marsh (5.3 ha). This activity may result in the incidental harm, harassment, or death of Pugnose Shiner (Notropis anogenus), Lake Chubsucker (Erimyzon sucetta), Eastern Pondmussel (Ligumia nasuta), Rainbow (Villosa iris), Spotted Gar (Lepisosteus oculatus), or Eastern Sand Darter (Ammocrypta pellucida) (Ontario populations) resulting from the application of herbicide, use of heavy equipment for spraying by ground, or oxygen depletion from vegetative die-off.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-HCAA-00700 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-08-06)

    Phragmites australis is an invasive species that is expanding exponentially in Long Point Bay and Rondeau Bay, displacing native species and limiting critical habitat for numerous species at risk. A method that has been used in the United States but is relatively new to Canada includes applying a custom made herbicide, RoundUp (active ingredient glyphosate), with AquaSurf (a surfactant), which has been shown to be effective at reducing Phragmites density and spread. This project is an extension of the works that the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (OMNRF) conducted in 2016, 2017 and 2018 in Long Point Bay and Rondeau Bay as part of a 5-year pilot project to determine the effectiveness of this method in Canada. The current proposal is to treat a total of 48 hectares in the following locations in Rondeau Bay and Long Point Bay by ground application: Rondeau Provincial Park (10 ha), Long Point Bay (5 ha), Turkey Point Region (1 ha), Lower Big Creek Marshes (6 ha), Big Creek Watershed (20 ha), North Shore of the Inner Bay (6 ha), and as required where regrowth is observed in Long Point Bay. This activity may result in the incidental harm, harassment, or death of Eastern Pondmussel (Ligumia nasuta), Round Pigtoe (Pleurobema sintoxia), Lake Chubsucker (Erimyzon sucetta), Pugnose Shiner (Notropis anogenus), Kidneyshell (Ptychobranchus fasciolaris), Rainbow (Villosa iris), Round Hickorynut (Obovaria subrotunda), Mapleleaf (Great Lakes - Upper St. Lawrence River populations) (Quadrula quadrula), Spotted Gar (Lepisosteus oculatus), or Eastern Sand Darter (Ammocrypta pellucida) (Ontario populations) resulting from the application of herbicide, use of heavy equipment for spraying by ground, or oxygen depletion from vegetative die-off.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-HCAA-01439 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2020-05-04)

    The project involves structural repairs to the deck, and patch repairs of abutments of two bridges located on the North Sydenham River. Work will be conducted with a turbidity curtain installed, and after a mussel and fish salvage occurs. Rip rap scour protection will be placed below the high water mark with an instream footprint of 35 m2 at each site. The activities authorized by this permit that may cause incidental harm to Lilliput (Toxolasma parvum), Eastern Sand Darter (Ammocrypta pellucida) (Ontario populations), and Pugnose Minnow (Opsopoeodus emiliae) are the incidental capture of Lilliput during site isolation and mussel relocation operations, and the incidental capture of Eastern Sand Darter and Pugnose Minnow during site isolation and fish relocation operations.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-PCAA-00001 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-02-06)

    The Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (OMNRF) is conducting a fish community survey in the Inner Long Point Bay of Lake Erie in March to May of 2019. This is a new program and is anticipated to take place annually. The gear used will be 4' hoop nets at 36 sites. Net sets will be 24 hours long. All species captured during the study will be identified, counted, and a subset measured for total length (up to 20 individuals). There is a spring commercial hoop net fishery in the Inner Bay and OMNRF wishes to perform an independent survey using the same gear during the same time period. It is probable that an at-risk species will be captured during the survey. However, it is expected that there will be minimal impacts on species at risk (SAR) populations because the gear being used is non-lethal, and captured fishes will be live released back into the lake at the site of capture. These activities may result in the incidental harm, harassment or death of the species listed on the permit resulting from capture, processing, and release.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-PCAA-00004 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-03-01)

    The objective of the activities covered by this permit are to determine the distribution and habitat preferences of native and non-native benthic fishes from southern Lake Huron through western Lake Erie (including the St. Clair River, Lake St. Clair, and Detroit River). Northern Madtom (Noturus stigmosus), Channel Darter (Percina copelandi), and Eastern Sand Darter (Ammocrypta pellucida) may be captured during these surveys. The activities will involve the capture of fishes using minnow traps, trawls, larval drift nets, fyke nets, boat electrofishing, and gill nets. The handling of fishes for the purposes of identification and processing (count, measures, photograph, etc.) will occur. Fishes collected will be identified, counted, and released alive, with the exception of some smaller fishes that may be retained to confirm identification. These activities may result in the incidental harm, harassment, or death of species at risk (SAR) resulting from capture, processing, and release.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-PCAA-00010), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-04-29)

    The objectives of the activities covered by this permit application are to conduct fish and mussel surveys in the Thames River watershed. Collected baseline data will be used to assist in future project proposals and inquiries. The activities authorized by this permit consist of the capture of any of the species listed on this permit from the Thames River watershed, and the handling of any of the species listed on this permit for the purposes of identification and processing (count, measure, photograph, etc.). Fishes will be released alive with the exception of some smaller fishes that may be retained to confirm identification. All mussels will be returned alive to the locations they were found. Fish sampling will be completed through the use of a backpack electrofishing unit. Mussel surveys will adhere to Mackie et al. (2008).
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-PCAA-00011), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-04-29)

    The objectives of the activities covered by this permit are to conduct fish and mussel surveys in the St. Clair River watershed and the Lake St. Clair watershed. Collected baseline data will be used to assist in future project proposals and inquiries. The activities authorized by this permit consist of the capture of any of the species listed on this permit from the St. Clair River watershed and the Lake St. Clair watershed, which will require the handling of any of the species listed on this permit for the purposes of identification and processing (count, photograph, etc.). Fishes will be released alive with the exception of some smaller fishes that may be retained to confirm identification. All mussels will be returned alive to the locations they were found. Sampling will be completed through the use of a backpack electrofishing unit, seine net, or minnow traps where necessary, using the Ontario Stream Assessment Protocol (OSAP). Mussel surveys will adhere to Mackie et al. (2008).
  • >> See more Permits and Related Agreements documents

Critical Habitat Descriptions in the Canada Gazette

  • Description of critical habitat of the Eastern Sand Darter, Ontario Populations in Long Point National Wildlife Area (2016-10-15)

    Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to subsection 58(2) of the Species at Risk Act, subsection 58(1) of that Act applies, 90 days after this publication, to the critical habitat of the Eastern Sand Darter, as identified in the recovery strategy on the Species at Risk Public Registry, within the following federally protected area:  Long Point National Wildlife Area, the boundaries of which are described in Schedule 1 of the Wildlife Area Regulations made pursuant to the Canada Wildlife Act.

Critical Habitat Orders

  • Critical Habitat of the Eastern Sand Darter (Ammocrypta pellucida) Ontario Populations Order (2017-12-13)

    The long-term objective of the Recovery Strategy is to maintain self-sustaining, extant populations and to restore self-sustaining populations to formerly occupied habitats, where feasible. Efforts to achieve both the short-term and long-term goals are ongoing and are supported through measures outlined in the Recovery Strategy. Present threats to the Eastern Sand Darter as identified in the Recovery Strategy, include turbidity and sediment loading, contaminants and toxic substances, nutrient loading, barriers to movement, altered flow regimes, shoreline modifications, incidental harvest, and invasive species and disease.

Recovery Document Posting Plans

  • Recovery Document Posting Plan - Fisheries and Oceans Canada - Fiscal Year 2016-2017 (2018-09-28)

    Under the Species at Risk Act (SARA), the competent Minister(s) must prepare a recovery strategy within one year of listing a species on Schedule 1 of SARA as endangered and within two years of listing a species as extirpated or threatened. A management plan must be prepared within three years for a species listed as special concern. Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) is accountable for 111 of the 518 species listed under SARA. As of February 2016, proposed recovery strategies, management plans and action plans for 57 of those species have not yet been posted to the Species at Risk Public Registry. An additional 23 aquatic species have proposed management or action plans coming due in the future. The following outlines the Department’s plan for posting proposed documents for 64 species on the Species at Risk Public Registry. The Department has a plan to post recovery strategies for 9 species, management plans for 13 species, and action plans for 42 species over the next year. Original publication of the Recovery Document Posting Plan: 2016-05-02
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