Species Profile

Pugnose Shiner

Scientific Name: Notropis anogenus
Taxonomy Group: Fishes
COSEWIC Range: Ontario
COSEWIC Assessment Date and Status Change: May 2013
COSEWIC Status: Threatened
COSEWIC Status Criteria: Does not meet any criteria, but designated Threatened because of a small area of occupancy, declining habitat quality, and concerns that many subpopulations may not be viable.
COSEWIC Reason for Designation: The species has a small area of occupancy and consists of numerous small populations, many of which may not be viable. At least two populations have been extirpated. Habitat degradation and loss continues to threaten populations, particularly in the western part of their distribution in the Lake Huron, Lake St. Clair and Lake Erie watersheds.
COSEWIC History of Status Designation: Designated Special Concern in April 1985. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in November 2002. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in May 2013.
SARA Status: Schedule 1, Threatened
Date of Listing (yyyy-mm-dd): 2005-01-12

Please note that this information is provided for general information purposes only. For the most up to date and accurate list of species listed under the Species at Risk Act, please see the Justice Laws Website.

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Quick Links: | Photo | Description | Habitat | Biology | Threats | Protection | Other Protection or Status | Recovery Initiatives | Recovery Team | National Recovery Program | Documents

Image of Pugnose Shiner

Pugnose Shiner Photo 1

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Description

The Pugnose Shiner (Notropis anogenus) is a member of the minnow family (Cyprinidae) and has the following characteristics: Body is fragile, slender and small, somewhat compressed laterally; extremely small upturned mouth; distinct black lateral band extends around snout and chin, through the eye to the caudal peduncle, ending with a small dark wedge-shaped caudal spot; overall colouration is silver with pale yellow and olive tints above the lateral black band; males become brightly golden in colour during spawning; all fins are transparent; eight dorsal rays; and total length is approximately 50 millimeters for males and 60 millimeters for females.

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Distribution and Population

The range of the Pugnose Shiner extends from Ontario, south to Illinois and west to North Dakota. The species has a disjunct distribution and it is often absent from theoretically suitable habitat within its range. In Canada, this species has only been found in four main areas of Ontario: 1) southern Lake Huron drainage; 2) Lake St. Clair; 3) Lake Erie; and 4) eastern Lake Ontario/upper St. Lawrence River drainage. It is assumed to be extirpated from Point Pelee and Rondeau Bay.

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Habitat

The Pugnose Shiner is usually found over sand and mud in slow-moving, clear, vegetated streams and lakes. It is found in sheltered ponds, wetlands, stagnant channels and protected bays adjacent to larger waterbodies.

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Biology

Spawning is thought to occur in late spring to early summer, and takes place in shallow, heavily vegetated waters. It does not guard its eggs, but rather distributes them widely over the aquatic plants and substrates.

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Threats

The Pugnose Shiner requires clear water with abundant aquatic vegetation. Habitat degradation and loss is the principal threat. Activities that contribute to these threats include agricultural, industrial and urban development, removal of aquatic vegetation, and changes in water quality/quantity. As many habitat areas are fragmented, there is limited connection between populations. Aquatic invasive species are also a growing threat, particularly Common Carp and Eurasian watermilfoil, due to their negative effects on native aquatic vegetation.

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Protection

Federal Protection

The Pugnose Shiner is protected under the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA). More information about SARA, including how it protects individual species, is available in the Species at Risk Act: A Guide.

Provincial and Territorial Protection

To know if this species is protected by provincial or territorial laws, consult the provinces' and territories' websites.

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Other Protection or Status

Under the SARA, a recovery strategy has been developed in collaboration with the recovery team, and several recovery measures have already been implemented. For example, there is currently an aquatic ecosystem-based recovery strategy for the Essex-Erie region, which helps to support populations of Pugnose Shiner. In addition, stewardship and outreach/awareness programs to reduce identified threats are ongoing. This species is also included within the Ausable River multi-species association. In 2002 the Ausable River Recovery Team was formed to develop an ecosystem-based recovery strategy for the watershed. The team synthesized existing information on four factors: species at risk (population trends, habitat needs and limiting factors), land use, water quality, and stream channel structure. This overview of the river’s health and threats provided a basis for the recovery strategy (draft available at www.abca.on.ca). This species is also being addressed under a recovery plan for the Thames River ecosystem. The recovery team has written a synthesis report that describes the distribution of aquatic species at risk in the watershed, habitat quality issues and threats to species at risk (available at www.thamesriver.on.ca)

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Recovery Initiatives

Status of Recovery Planning

Recovery Strategies :

Name Recovery strategy for the Pugnose Shiner (Notropis anogenus) in Canada
Status Final posting on SAR registry

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Recovery Team

Essex-Erie Recovery Team

  • Shawn Staton - Chair/Contact - Fisheries and Oceans Canada
    Phone: 905-336-4864  Fax: 905-336-6437  Send Email

Ontario Freshwater Fish Recovery Team

  • Amy Boyko - Chair/Contact - Fisheries and Oceans Canada
    Phone: 905-336-6236  Fax: 905-336-6437  Send Email
  • Shawn Staton - Chair/Contact - Fisheries and Oceans Canada
    Phone: 905-336-4864  Fax: 905-336-6437  Send Email

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Documents

PLEASE NOTE: Not all COSEWIC reports are currently available on the SARA Public Registry. Most of the reports not yet available are status reports for species assessed by COSEWIC prior to May 2002. Other COSEWIC reports not yet available may include those species assessed as Extinct, Data Deficient or Not at Risk. In the meantime, they are available on request from the COSEWIC Secretariat.

169 record(s) found.

Reports on the Progress of Recovery Document Implementation

COSEWIC Status Reports

  • COSEWIC assessment and update status report on the Pugnose Shiner Notropis anogenus in Canada (2014-01-02)

    The Pugnose Shiner (Notropis anogenus Forbes, 1885) is a small silvery minnow with a dark lateral band extending from the tail forward onto the snout. Its mouth is very small and upturned. Females reach 6 cm and males reach 5 cm. The Pugnose Shiner is most similar to the Blackchin Shiner (Notropis heterodon), which can be distinguished by its larger mouth. The Pugnose Minnow (Opsopoeodus emiliae) also has a small upturned mouth but, unlike the Pugnose Shiner, has typically 9 dorsal rays, dark areas on the dorsal fin and crosshatched areas on the upper side.

Response Statements

  • Response Statement - Pugnose Shiner (2013-12-18)

    The species has a small area of occupancy and consists of numerous small populations, many of which may not be viable. At least two populations have been extirpated. Habitat degradation and loss continues to threaten populations, particularly in the western part of their distribution in the Lake Huron, Lake St. Clair and Lake Erie watersheds.
  • Response Statements - Pugnose Shiner (2004-04-21)

    A response statement is a communications document that identifies how the Minister of the Environment intends to respond to the assessment of a wildlife species by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC). The document provides a start to the listing and recovery process for those species identified as being at risk, and provides timelines for action to the extent possible.

Recovery Strategies

  • Recovery strategy for the Pugnose Shiner (Notropis anogenus) in Canada (2013-01-25)

    The Pugnose Shiner is a small minnow that is distinguished from similar species by its tiny, upturned, mouth and black stomach cavity lining. Colouration is mostly silver with yellow and olive tints above the lateral black band where scales are heavily outlined. Male Pugnose Shiner can reach total lengths (TL) of 50 mm, while females can reach up to 60 mm TL. This species is found in highly-vegetated, clear, slow-moving water, and its distribution and recovery potential is believed to be limited by the distribution and abundance of these habitat types. The Pugnose Shiner is considered globally rare to uncommon (G3), and was designated as Endangered in Canada in November 2002 by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada. Status at state levels varies from extirpated (SX – Ohio) to vulnerable (S3 in Michigan and Minnesota). The first version of this recovery strategy was originally posted in 2013. The current version posted here has been amended, as per Section 45 of the Act, from the first version, to make a minor correction to the map identifying critical habitat in the Little Bear Creek.

Action Plans

  • Action plan for the Ausable River in Canada: an ecosystem approach (2020-03-02)

    The Ausable River, located on the northern edge of the Carolinian Zone in southwestern Ontario, supports one of the most diverse and unique assemblages of aquatic fauna for a watershed of its size in Canada. At least 26 species of freshwater mussels and 85 species of fish have been found here. Many of these species are rare and 12 species, including six mussels and six fishes, have been assessed by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada as Endangered, Threatened or Special Concern. The majority of these species are protected under the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA) and/or the Ontario Endangered Species Act, 2007 (ESA). Five freshwater mussels (Kidneyshell, Northern Riffleshell, Snuffbox, Mapleleaf and Rainbow) and three fishes (Eastern Sand Darter, Lake Chubsucker and Pugnose Shiner) are the focus of this Action Plan. The needs of these at risk fishes and mussels within the Ausable River watershed will be addressed using a multi-species, ecosystem-based approach. The present plan is guided by seven SARA recovery strategies for these eight species and builds on the draft ecosystem-based Ausable River Recovery Strategy that was developed (Shawn Staton, ARRT, unpublished, 2005).
  • Multi-species Action Plan for Thousand Islands National Park of Canada (2016-03-29)

    The Multi-species Action Plan for Thousand Islands National Park of Canada is a Species At Risk Act action plan (SARA s.47) for four species: American Water-willow (Justicia americana), Butternut (Juglans cinerea), Deerberry (Vaccinium stamineum), and Pugnose Shiner (Notropis anogenus). The plan also outlines measures to monitor and manage 30 other species of conservation concern that regularly occur in the park. This plan applies only to lands and waters occurring within the boundaries of Thousand Islands National Park of Canada.

Orders

  • Order Acknowledging Receipt of the Assessments Done Pursuant to Subsection 23(1) of the Species at Risk Act (2004-04-21)

    This Order acknowledges receipt by the Governor in Council of the assessments of the status of wildlife species done pursuant to subsection 23(1) of the Species at Risk Act (SARA) by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC). The purpose of SARA is to prevent wildlife species from being extirpated or becoming extinct, to provide for the recovery of wildlife species that are extirpated, endangered or threatened as a result of human activity and to manage species of special concern to prevent them from becoming endangered or threatened.
  • Order Amending Schedule 1 to the Species at Risk Act (Volume 153, Number 17, 2019) (2019-08-21)

    Biodiversity is rapidly declining at all scales, from local to global, as a result of a variety of human activities that increase the rates of species extinction. Current extinction rates are estimated to be between 1 000 and 10 000 times higher than the natural background rate. Higher species diversity positively supports healthy and productive ecosystems that are more resilient to disturbances, and, given the interdependency of species, a loss of biodiversity can lead to a declining resilience of ecosystem functions and services (e.g. natural processes such as pest control, pollination, coastal wave attenuation, pharmaceutical products, temperature regulation and carbon fixing). These services are vital to the health of all Canadians and are important for Canada’s economic well-being. Biodiversity loss can therefore result in adverse, irreversible and broad-ranging effects on Canadians.
  • Order Amending Schedules 1 to 3 to the Species at Risk Act (volume 139, number 2, 2005) (2005-01-12)

    Schedule 1, the List of Wildlife Species at Risk of the Species at Risk Act (SARA), is amended by Order of the Governor in Council (GIC), on the recommendation of the Minister of the Environment, by the addition of 73 species. This Order is based on scientific assessments by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) and follows consultations with provincial and territorial governments, Aboriginal peoples, stakeholders and the public, and analysis of costs and benefits to Canadians.

COSEWIC Annual Reports

  • COSEWIC Annual Report - 2003 (2003-10-01)

    May 2003 Annual Report to the Canadian Endangered Species Conservation Council by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada.
  • COSEWIC Annual Report – 2012-2013 (2013-09-24)

    Under Canada’s Species at Risk Act (SARA), the foremost function of COSEWIC is to “assess the status of each wildlife species considered by COSEWIC to be at risk and, as part of the assessment, identify existing and potential threats to the species”. COSEWIC held two Wildlife Species Assessment Meetings in this reporting year (October, 2012 to September 2013) from November 25 to November 30, 2012 and from April 28 to May 3, 2013. During the current reporting period, COSEWIC assessed the status or reviewed the classification of 73 wildlife species. The wildlife species assessment results for the 2012-2013 reporting period include the following: Extinct: 0 Extirpated: 2 Endangered: 28 Threatened: 19 Special Concern: 19 Data Deficient: 4 Not at Risk: 1 Total: 73 Of the 73 wildlife species examined, COSEWIC reviewed the classification of 50 species that had been previously assessed. The review of classification for 26 of those species resulted in a confirmation of the same status as the previous assessment.

Permits and Related Agreements

  • Explanation for issuing other simliar documents(#19-HCAA-01966 ), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2020-08-25)

    The purpose of this project is to use Round-up (Glyphosate), a herbicide, to manage the control and spread of Phragmites australis as part of an invasive species management plan that is being completed in partnership between the Canadian Wildlife Service, the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry, and the Nature Conservancy of Canada. The project will take place on federal lands where there is a need to control the invasive aquatic reed Phragmites to support wetland rehabilitation, the restoration of fish habitat, and the protection of Spotted Gar (Lepisosteus oculatus), Pugnose Shiner (Notropis anogenus), and Lake Chubsucker (Erimyzon sucetta), all of which all have critical habitat in this area and are protected under the Species at Risk Act. The works include the aerial and ground spraying of herbicides in combination with mechanical removal. According to the proponent, since 2006, Phragmites has increased in coverage inside the Big Creek National Wildlife Area, and at both the Thoroughfare Unit and Squires Ridge of the Long Point National Wildlife Area. The project involves both the spraying of deleterious substances combined with mechanical rolling, resulting in a maximum total footprint of 550,530 m2 of Phragmites removal. The proponent states that this integrated management approach (combining physical management with herbicide application) is consistent with established best management practices for Phragmites control. Based on aerial imaging, a review of the proponent's application and the relevant recovery strategies, it was determined that the fringe/overspray areas would be considered critical habitat. Approximately 35,530 m2 of critical habitat for Spotted Gar, Pugnose Shiner, and Lake Chubsucker will be destroyed and an offsetting plan has been developed that will offset impacts to the critical habitat. The proposed offsetting will result in a minimum of 515,000 m2 of habitat created. This integrated management approach has been applied in the United States for over 40 years and has an established history of success.
  • Explanation for issuing other simliar documents(#20-HCAA-01397 ), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2020-08-21)

    The purpose of this project is to use Round-up, Glyphosate, which is a herbicide used to manage the control and spread of Phragmites australis as part of an invasive species management plan that is being completed by the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry. The project is being completed to support wetland rehabilitation, the restoration of fish habitat, and the protection of Spotted Gar (Lepisosteus oculatus), Pugnose Shiner (Notropis anogenus), and Lake Chubsucker (Erimyzon sucetta) all of which all have critical habitat in this area and are protected under the Species at Risk Act. The project involves both the spraying of deleterious substances combined with mechanical rolling. The proponent states that this integrated management approach (combining physical management with herbicide application) is consistent with established best management practices for Phragmites control. Based on aerial imaging, a review of the proponent's application and the relevant recovery strategies it was determined that 386,170 m2 will be sprayed or mechanically removed below the high water mark and includes the destruction of 67,700 m2 of Spotted Gar, Pugnose Shiner, and Lake Chubsucker critical habitat within the Long Point Crown Marsh.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(# 45602), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2020-10-01)

    Fish will be surveyed in Brooker's Pond on Grendier Island in Thousand Islands National Park. Anticipated SAR fish that may be caught include Pugnose Shiner (threatened), Bridle Shiner (special concern) and Grass Pickerel (special concern). Surveyors will utilize a combination of seine nets, baited hoop nets, minnow traps, dip nets and/or a backpack electrofisher to sample areas identified as high-value habitat. Method for fish capture will be at the discretion of the surveyor, but ultimately the method of capture at each location will be the least invasive method. All fish species encountered will be identified to species level and enumerated and recorded with the potential to record additional morphometric data on target species including digital vouchers. All fish will be returned to their natural habitat from which they were captured using sufficient mitigations to reduce stress on captured fish. This data will help satisfy targets set out in the multi-species action plan for TINP and can help determine management actions and improve SAR recovery actions in the future.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(# DFO-15-PCAA-00008), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2015-04-10)

    This is an annual young-of-year (YOY) index survey on Lake St. Clair that has been carried out intermittently since 1979. This program is used to assess YOY abundance and diversity of key economically and ecologically important species in addition to the nearshore fish community composition and abundance. Fixed sites on the lake allow changes in community structure to be tracked, relative abundance and presence of aquatic invasive fish through time.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(# DFO-15-PCAA-00024), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2015-07-01)

    The objective is to sample Round Goby for both behavioural and genomic assays. The source site will be St. Claire River near Sarnia, where the Round Goby was initially found and assumed to be the first longest established site. The established sites will be the river mouths and the invasion fronts will be determined by methods from Bronnenhuber et al. (2011).
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#17-PCAA-00001), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2017-03-10)

    The St. Clair Region Conservation Authority (SCRCA) is sampling fish and mussels in several locations for presence/absence data. Currently, fish and mussel data is lacking in these areas. Baseline data will be collected to assist in future project proposals and inquiries. Benthic sampling will be undertaken for watershed characterization to allow the SCRCA to assess water quality throughout the watershed. Data obtained will assist the SCRCA in the identification of potential rehabilitation sites and impact monitoring.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#17-PCAA-00004), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2017-03-29)

    The objective of the project is to apply selective lampricide to assess and control Sea Lamprey populations in the Great Lakes. Assessment surveys are routinely conducted in tributaries and lentic areas to determine the presence, distribution, and abundance of Sea Lamprey larvae. In deep water (>0.8 m) areas, surveys are conducted with the application of granular Bayluscide, a bottom-release formulation of lampricide, within the demarcated boundaries of the plots with a standard area of 500 m2. Tributaries harbouring larval Sea Lamprey are treated periodically with lampricides to eliminate or reduce larval populations before they recruit to the lake as feeding juveniles. The treatment units administer and analyze TFM, or TFM/Niclosamide mixtures (TFM augmented with Bayluscide 70% wettable powder or 20% emulsifiable concentrate) during stream treatments, and apply 3.2% granular Bayluscide (gB) to control populations inhabiting lentic areas.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#17-PCAA-00005), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2017-04-06)

    The purpose of the activity is early detection surveillance sampling for Asian carps. Sampling is planned for near shore and tributaries throughout the Canadian waters of the Great Lakes basin. A total of 36 early detection sites have been selected in the Great Lakes basin. Combinations of sampling gears are deployed at each site in order in target all life-stages of Asian carps. A community assessment of the fishes present in the areas is collected. Field sampling techniques include a combination of passive and active fish sampling gears. A combination of gear types has proven to be the most effective method for detecting the majority of fishes in a specific habitat type.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#17-PCAA-00006), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2017-04-07)

    This is an annual young-of-year (YOY) index survey of Lake St. Clair that has been carried out intermittently since 1979. This program is used to assess YOY abundance and diversity of key economically and ecologically important species in addition to the nearshore fish community composition and abundance. Fixed sites on the lake allow changes in the community structure relative abundances and presences of aquatic invasive species and species at risk to be tracked through time. Collection is carried out using a 30' long 1/8" mesh beach scene in 2m of water or less during daylight hours. Seine hauls are carried out perpendicular to the shore and are approximately 30m in length. Captured fishes are identified, enumerated and released on site.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#17-PCAA-00007), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2017-04-07)

    The purpose of the activity project is to monitor the abundance and distribution of the nearshore fish community in the Upper St. Lawrence River and Lake St. Francis, with a focus on fish species in the minnow family (Cyprinidae). Fish communities will be surveyed using beach seines (30' length, 1/4" mesh) following standard protocols used by DFO and Parks Canada (Thousand Islands National Park). Species will be captured, identified, and immediately released live on site.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#17-PCAA-00010), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2017-04-10)

    The goal of this research is to assess the status of freshwater fishes in southwestern Ontario wetlands in order to inform the management, conservation, and restoration of these systems. Wetlands in will be surveyed to assemble fish community data and assess the status of fishes at risk in these regions. Eight weeks of fieldwork in wetlands throughout southwestern Ontario will be completed in the summer of 2017. The eight weeks of fieldwork will include seining and mini fyke nets.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#17-PCAA-00011), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2017-04-10)

    This is a monitoring project to investigate the use and suitability of newly created wetland sites at Crown Marsh; sampling will occur annually. Study design permits characterization of successional changes. Each summer, fishes are sampled by five hauls of a bag seine within a 75 m2 area, enclosed by a block-net. At each site, fish and macrophyte sampling take place at 10 randomly selected points. Visual estimates are used to characterize aquatic macrophyte species composition and submersed plant coverage. The same sampling methods will be applied to: 1) inventory fishes in currently isolated ponds; and, 2) characterize changes to fish assemblage composition over a three-year period after isolated ponds are connected to Long Point Bay.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#18-­HCAA­-00938 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-07-16)

    This activity is being undertaken due to the replacement of an existing bridge and bridge footings over Long Marsh Drain at Concession Road 2N in Amherstburg, Ontario. To achieve this, the proposed activities will require the installation of steel sheet pile cofferdams to isolate bridge footings from the watercourse and allow for a dry work area to remove the existing footings, the installation of new concrete footings, and removal of the cofferdams. This will require in­stream isolation, fish relocation, and dewatering activities. Pugnose Shiner (Notropis anogenus) is known to be present in the watercourse when the activities are to take place and may be incidentally captured during fish relocation operations or harmed during site isolation and dewatering.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-HCAA-00158 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-08-07)

    Phragmites australis is an invasive species that is expanding exponentially in Long Point Bay displacing native species and limiting critical habitat for numerous species at risk. A method that has been used in the United States but is relatively new to Canada includes applying a custom made herbicide, RoundUp (active ingredient glyphosate), with AquaSurf (a surfactant), which has been shown to be effective at reducing Phragmites density and spread. This project is an extension of the works that the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (OMNRF) has conducted in 2016, 2017 and 2018 and is proposed for 2019 in Long Point Bay and Rondeau Bay as part of a 5-year pilot project to determine the effectiveness of this method in Canada. The current proposal is to treat a total of 9.7 hectares in the following locations in Long Point Bay by ground application: Otter Pond (0.4 ha), Long Pond (4 ha), and Brown's Marsh (5.3 ha). This activity may result in the incidental harm, harassment, or death of Pugnose Shiner (Notropis anogenus), Lake Chubsucker (Erimyzon sucetta), Eastern Pondmussel (Ligumia nasuta), Rainbow (Villosa iris), Spotted Gar (Lepisosteus oculatus), or Eastern Sand Darter (Ammocrypta pellucida) (Ontario populations) resulting from the application of herbicide, use of heavy equipment for spraying by ground, or oxygen depletion from vegetative die-off.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-HCAA-00361 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2020-07-20)

    The activity is being undertaken to replace three undersized culverts on Chappus Drain near LaSalle, Ontario. The hydraulic capacity will be improved from 14.19 m3/s to 15.20 m3/s to prevent future crossing failures and potential flooding. Two pre-cast concrete box culverts with river stone installed along the channel bottom are proposed to increase hydraulic capacity and meet fish passage requirements. Approximately 280 m2 of channel will be isolated during a temporary disruption to create dry conditions for the purpose of excavating the existing culverts and installing new culverts. Isolation of the existing channel will be a full constriction for a maximum of four weeks. All in-water works will be conducted between July 20 and August 31, 2020. Pugnose Minnow (Opsopoeodus emiliae) distribution habitat is present at the crossing location, and Pugnose Shiner (Notropis anogenus) distribution habitat is present 100 m downstream of the proposed works. Pugnose Minnow, and to a lesser extent, Pugnose Shiner may be present at the time of construction. Distribution habitat is also present for Spotted Sucker (Minytrema melanops) and Silver Lamprey (Ichthyomyzon unicuspis), listed as species of Special Concern, downstream of the proposed culvert replacements.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-HCAA-00700 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-08-06)

    Phragmites australis is an invasive species that is expanding exponentially in Long Point Bay and Rondeau Bay, displacing native species and limiting critical habitat for numerous species at risk. A method that has been used in the United States but is relatively new to Canada includes applying a custom made herbicide, RoundUp (active ingredient glyphosate), with AquaSurf (a surfactant), which has been shown to be effective at reducing Phragmites density and spread. This project is an extension of the works that the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (OMNRF) conducted in 2016, 2017 and 2018 in Long Point Bay and Rondeau Bay as part of a 5-year pilot project to determine the effectiveness of this method in Canada. The current proposal is to treat a total of 48 hectares in the following locations in Rondeau Bay and Long Point Bay by ground application: Rondeau Provincial Park (10 ha), Long Point Bay (5 ha), Turkey Point Region (1 ha), Lower Big Creek Marshes (6 ha), Big Creek Watershed (20 ha), North Shore of the Inner Bay (6 ha), and as required where regrowth is observed in Long Point Bay. This activity may result in the incidental harm, harassment, or death of Eastern Pondmussel (Ligumia nasuta), Round Pigtoe (Pleurobema sintoxia), Lake Chubsucker (Erimyzon sucetta), Pugnose Shiner (Notropis anogenus), Kidneyshell (Ptychobranchus fasciolaris), Rainbow (Villosa iris), Round Hickorynut (Obovaria subrotunda), Mapleleaf (Great Lakes - Upper St. Lawrence River populations) (Quadrula quadrula), Spotted Gar (Lepisosteus oculatus), or Eastern Sand Darter (Ammocrypta pellucida) (Ontario populations) resulting from the application of herbicide, use of heavy equipment for spraying by ground, or oxygen depletion from vegetative die-off.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-PCAA-00001 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-02-06)

    The Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (OMNRF) is conducting a fish community survey in the Inner Long Point Bay of Lake Erie in March to May of 2019. This is a new program and is anticipated to take place annually. The gear used will be 4' hoop nets at 36 sites. Net sets will be 24 hours long. All species captured during the study will be identified, counted, and a subset measured for total length (up to 20 individuals). There is a spring commercial hoop net fishery in the Inner Bay and OMNRF wishes to perform an independent survey using the same gear during the same time period. It is probable that an at-risk species will be captured during the survey. However, it is expected that there will be minimal impacts on species at risk (SAR) populations because the gear being used is non-lethal, and captured fishes will be live released back into the lake at the site of capture. These activities may result in the incidental harm, harassment or death of the species listed on the permit resulting from capture, processing, and release.
  • >> See more Permits and Related Agreements documents

Consultation Documents

  • Consultation on Amending the List of Species Under the Species at Risk Act - Central & Arctic Region (2004-04-19)

    Your opinion is being sought to assist the government of Canada in making an informed decision on whether to add the Northern Madtom, Pugnose Shiner, Kidneyshell, Round Hickorynut, Lake Winnipeg Physa Snail, Channel Darter, Shortjaw Cisco, and Atlantic Cod (Arctic population) to the Schedule 1 (the List of Wildlife Species at Risk) of the Species at Risk Act (SARA). Your input on the impacts of adding these species to the List is important. This workbook has been developed to give you an opportunity to provide Fisheries and Oceans Canada with your feedback, advice, and other comments regarding adding these species to Schedule 1 of SARA (Schedule 1 identifies which species are legally protected under SARA).
  • Pugnose Shiner - Consultations on listing under the Species at Risk Act (2014-07-15)

    Pugnose Shiner has recently been re-assessed as “Threatened” by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada. It is currently listed under the Species at Risk Act at the higher risk level of “Endangered”.  Before deciding whether to accept the re-assessment under the act, Fisheries and Oceans Canada would like your opinion, comments and suggestions regarding the possible ecological, cultural and economic impacts of listing the species as Threatened. Please provide your input September 30, 2014.

Critical Habitat Descriptions in the Canada Gazette

  • Description of critical habitat of the Pugnose Shiner in Thousand Islands National Park of Canada and Big Creek, Long Point, St. Clair, and Wellers Bay national wildlife areas (2016-10-15)

    Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to subsection 58(2) of the Species at Risk Act, subsection 58(1) of that Act applies, 90 days after publication of this notice, to the critical habitat of the Pugnose Shiner, as identified in the recovery strategy on the Species at Risk Public Registry, within the following federally protected areas: Thousand Islands National Park, the boundaries of which are described in Schedule 1 of the Canada National Parks Act, as well as the Big Creek Unit of Big Creek National Wildlife Area, Long Point National Wildlife Area, the St. Clair Unit of St. Clair National Wildlife Area, and Wellers Bay National Wildlife Area, the boundaries each of which are described in Schedule 1 of the Wildlife Area Regulations made pursuant to the Canada Wildlife Act.

Critical Habitat Orders

Exceptions

  • Public Registry Notice for s.83 Exceptions - Former Camp Ipperwash (2015-03-06)

    As per the Memorandum of Understanding between DND, Environment Canada, and the Parks Canada Agency: 6.1 c) Activities occurring on Defence Establishments that are considered necessary for public safety in accordance with paragraph a) and authorized under the National Defence Act and the Explosives Act are: Remediation of contaminated sites; and Securing, handling, destruction or disposal of unsafe munitions, including unexploded explosive ordnance.
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