Species Profile

Redside Dace

Scientific Name: Clinostomus elongatus
Taxonomy Group: Fishes
COSEWIC Range: Ontario
COSEWIC Assessment Date and Status Change: November 2017
COSEWIC Status: Endangered
COSEWIC Status Criteria: A2b+3bc+4bc+B2ab(i,ii,iii,iv,v)
COSEWIC Reason for Designation: This small, colourful minnow is highly susceptible to changes in stream flow and declines in water quality, such as those that occur in urban and agricultural watersheds. The Canadian range of this species largely overlaps with the Greater Toronto Area (GTA), where urban land use is widespread and projected to increase in the future. The continued expansion of the GTA has led to ongoing habitat degradation, causing serious declines in range and number of individuals and populations.
COSEWIC History of Status Designation: Designated Special Concern in April 1987. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in April 2007 and November 2017.
SARA Status: Schedule 1, Endangered
Date of Listing (yyyy-mm-dd): 2017-04-13

Please note that this information is provided for general information purposes only. For the most up to date and accurate list of species listed under the Species at Risk Act, please see the Justice Laws Website.

Go to advanced search

Quick Links: | Photo | Description | Habitat | Biology | Threats | Protection | Recovery Team | National Recovery Program | Documents

Image of Redside Dace

Redside Dace Photo 1

Top

Description

The Redside Dace has a pointed head and a large terminal mouth; one dorsal fin; a forked caudal fin; and pelvics fins and elongated pectoral fins which are longer on males than on females. The back of the fish is dark green or blue-green; below the back there is a gold stripe along the sides, and under this there is an orange or red band. There are blue, green, purple and violet reflections on the body of the fish; the colors are more intense on males than on females and intensify during spawning. Redside Dace measure, on average, 76 mm.

Top

Distribution and Population

In Canada, Redside Dace are found only in Ontario. Canadian populations of of the fish are declining and may have been extirpated from some areas.

Top

Habitat

The Redside Dace inhabits pools and slow moving areas of small streams, where overhanging bushes and trees offer cover; where the bottom is composed of rocks, gravel or sand; and where the water is clear.

Top

Biology

The Redside Dace feeds on insects, which it catches by leaping out of the water. Females are usually larger than males. Redside Dace live up to three years. Spawning occurs in May.

Top

Threats

The main factors which have adversely affected Redside Dace populations are destruction and degradation of habitat through siltation; removal of bank cover; and water quality deterioration.

Top

Protection

Federal Protection

The Redside Dace is protected under the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA). More information about SARA, including how it protects individual species, is available in the Species at Risk Act: A Guide.

The Federal Fisheries Act prohibits destruction of fish habitat.

Provincial and Territorial Protection

To know if this species is protected by provincial or territorial laws, consult the provinces' and territories' websites.

Top

Recovery Team

Grand River Recovery Team

  • Shawn Staton - Chair/Contact - Fisheries and Oceans Canada
    Phone: 905-336-4864  Fax: 905-336-6437  Send Email

Redside Dace Recovery Team

  • Mark Heaton - Chair/Contact - Government of Ontario
     Send Email

Top

Documents

PLEASE NOTE: Not all COSEWIC reports are currently available on the SARA Public Registry. Most of the reports not yet available are status reports for species assessed by COSEWIC prior to May 2002. Other COSEWIC reports not yet available may include those species assessed as Extinct, Data Deficient or Not at Risk. In the meantime, they are available on request from the COSEWIC Secretariat.

113 record(s) found.

COSEWIC Status Reports

  • COSEWIC Assessment and Status Report on the Redside Dace (Clinostomus elongatus) in Canada (2018-10-15)

    Redside Dace is a colourful minnow that features a yellow lateral stripe extending the length of the body and a bright red stripe below the yellow. The back is a variable shade of green and the ventral surface is silvery white. The body is slender and laterally compressed. Maximum size is 120 mm. Redside Dace has a long snout with a projecting lower jaw. Pectoral fins are longer in males than females. The species is an indicator of habitat quality. Note: This COSEWIC assessment was received by the Minister on October 15th, 2018.
  • COSEWIC Assessment and Update Status Report on the Redside Dace (Clinostomus elongatus) in Canada (2007-08-29)

    The redside dace is a colourful minnow that reaches a maximum length of 12 cm. In the spring it develops a bright red stripe along the front half of the body and a brilliant yellow stripe above. It is distinguished from other Canadian cyprinids by its very large mouth, protruding lower jaw, and large pectoral fins on the male. It is one of two species in the genus Clinostomus which is currently believed to be most closely related to Richardsonius, a genus of western dace.

Response Statements

  • Response Statement - Redside Dace (2007-12-04)

    This species is especially sensitive to stream alterations that interfere with flow regimes and lead to increased siltation and water temperatures. It has been lost from 5 of its 24 historic locations, and may now be gone from an additional 5; continuing decline is evident in 8 of the 14 remaining locations. More than 80% of the Canadian distribution occurs in the ‘Golden Horseshoe Region’ of southwestern Ontario where urban development poses the most immediate threat to the continued existence of this species in Canada. The 6 stable populations are on the fringe of urban development in watersheds that are, as yet, relatively undisturbed, but more than 50 % of these locations are in, or adjacent to, areas that are expected to be developed within the next 10 to 15 years.
  • Response Statement - Redside Dace (2019-01-11)

    This small, colourful minnow is highly susceptible to changes in stream flow and declines in water quality, such as those that occur in urban and agricultural watersheds. The Canadian range of this species largely overlaps with the Greater Toronto Area (GTA), where urban land use is widespread and projected to increase in the future. The continued expansion of the GTA has led to ongoing habitat degradation, causing serious declines in range and number of individuals and populations.

Action Plans

  • Multi-species Action Plan for Rouge National Urban Park of Canada (2021-10-07)

    The Multi-species Action Plan for Rouge National Urban Park of Canada applies to all federally owned lands and waters managed by Parks Canada in Rouge National Urban Park (RNUP), including Bead Hill National Historic Site. To the extent possible, it has been prepared in cooperation with Environment and Climate Change Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, the province of Ontario, the Rouge National Urban Park First Nations Advisory Circle, and environmental non-government organizations as per section 48(1) of SARA. The plan meets the requirements for action plans set out in the Species at Risk Act (SARA s.47) for species requiring an action plan and that regularly occur at this site. Measures described in this plan will also provide benefits for other species of conservation concern that regularly occur at RNUP. In light of the current Covid-19 pandemic, the 60-day public comment period on the proposed Multi-species Action Plan for Rouge National Urban Park of Canada has been extended to 90 days to provide sufficient time for feedback.

Orders

COSEWIC Annual Reports

  • COSEWIC Annual Report - 2007 (2007-08-30)

    2007 Annual Report to the The Minister of the Environment and the Canadian Endangered Species Conservation Council (CESCC) from the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada.
  • COSEWIC Annual Report 2017 to 2018 (2018-10-15)

    Over the past year COSEWIC assessed a total of 90 wildlife species and 11 of these were assigned a status of Not at Risk. Of these 90, COSEWIC re-examined the status of 38 wildlife species; of these, the majority (87%) were reassessed at the same or lower level of risk. To date and with the submission of this report, COSEWIC’s assessments now include 771 wildlife species in various risk categories including 338 Endangered, 183 Threatened, 228 Special Concern, and 22 Extirpated (i.e. no longer found in the wild in Canada). In addition, 18 wildlife species have been assessed as Extinct, and a total of 59 wildlife species have also been designated as Data Deficient and 197 have been assessed and assigned Not at Risk status.

Permits and Related Agreements

  • Explanation for issuing other simliar documents(#17-HCAA-01440 ), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2021-01-05)

    The proposed project involves construction of a residential development south of Highway 401, between Tremaine Road and Peru Road, in the town of Milton, Ontario. As part of the project, Tremaine Road will be realigned and expanded to a four lane urban roadway, and Peru Road will be abandoned. The new alignment of Tremaine Road will cross Highway 401; therefore, construction of a new interchange, with ramp connections to and from Highway 401, is required. The new interchange and overpass will necessitate a variety of additional features, including a storm water management pond for the Milton Heights residential development, which will be located northwest of the Peru Road and 3rd Side Road intersection, new culverts for the ramps, and the extension of an existing culvert. To accommodate future traffic conditions at the Highway 401 and Tremaine Road interchange, realignment of an unnamed tributary to Sixteen Mile Creek will also be required. This unnamed tributary, herein referred to as Tributary NW-1-2G, has been identified as occupied habitat for Redside Dace (Clinostomus elongatus). Offsetting measures shall be undertaken adjacent to the existing channel of Tributary NW-2-G1 south of Highway 401 between Tremaine Road and Peru Road. Measures shall include the construction of a new, 1816 m long section of meandering naturalized channel to replace the section of the existing channel of Tributary NW-2-G1 that will be infilled. The new channel has been designed to provide suitable habitat for Redside Dace and will incorporate overhanging vegetation, deep pools, undercut banks, gradual bed slopes upstream of riffle crests, and instream features such as boulders and large woody debris. The new channel will be built in the dry and will be allowed to stabilize for a minimum of one year prior to the diversion of flow into the new channel. Second, the construction of a broad, naturalized enhanced riparian and floodplain corridor encompassing the new meandering natural channel to create 91,425 m2 of suitable habitat for Redside Dace. The enhanced corridor will include naturalized features such as wetland pockets, wetland plantings, vegetated rip rap, and upland and lowland reforestation areas to enhance bank material strength and aquatic and terrestrial habitat functions. Finally, offsetting will include the planting of riparian vegetation, consisting of deciduous and coniferous trees, shrubs and ground cover species as per the final version of the Proponent's revegetation plan approved by Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO).
  • Explanation for issuing other simliar documents(#18-HCAA-00553), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2019-06-25)

    The proposed project of which the work, undertaking, or activity authorized is a part, involves the widening of Leslie Street between Elgin Mills Road and 19th Avenue in the town of Richmond Hill over unnamed Tributary 4 of the Rouge River to accommodate additional vehicle lanes and a sidewalk. The road widening will largely occur to the east of the existing roadway and will require removal of the existing culvert and installation of a new culvert. To complete the culvert replacement, a site isolation is required. In addition, road expansion to the east requires the infilling of a section of the existing channel and construction of a new channel in order to accommodate the new, larger culvert and flows from another tributary. The project will also result in the removal of approximately 5400 m2 of riparian vegetation impacting Redside Dace (Clinostomus elongatus) habitat. Tributary 4 is known to be occupied habitat for Redside Dace, which is listed as Endangered under Schedule 1 of the Species at Risk Act. A fish rescue and relocation will take place before construction activities begin.
  • Explanation for issuing other simliar documents(#18-HCAA-00554), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2019-06-25)

    The activity is being undertaken to widen Leslie Street between Elgin Mills Road and 19th Avenue in Richmond Hill, Ontario. The works require removal of the existing culvert and installation of a new culvert over an unnamed tributary of the Rouge River (Tributary 3) in contributing habitat for Redside Dace (Clinostomus elongatus) to accommodate the roadway upgrades. To complete the culvert replacement, a site isolation is required. In addition, road expansion to the east requires the infilling of a section of the existing channel and construction of a new channel in order to accommodate the new, larger culvert. The project will also result in the removal of approximately 1,944 m2 of riparian vegetation impacting Redside Dace. Direct and indirect effects to Redside Dace will be incidental to carrying out road expansion. To achieve the project objectives, the proposed activities will require conducting fish rescues where Redside Dace may be present.
  • Explanation for issuing other simliar documents(#18-HCAA-01000 ), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2019-08-06)

    Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA) is proposing to implement regional sanitary infrastructure protection and remedial erosion control works. There are two distinct subprojects: Patterson Creek near Richvale Community Centre Sanitary Infrastructure Protection (Patterson Richvale) Project, and Patterson Creek Valley Erosion Hazards (Patterson Valley) Project. The project involves channel realignment and bank stabilization on a section of the creek that has been designated as Redside Dace (Clinostomus elongatus) occupied and recovery habitat. This activity will involve channel realignment and bank stabilization along four sites within Patterson Creek: Patterson Richvale (Site I-075, P-1005, P-107, and I-070) and Patterson Valley (Site CC, C8, C9, C10, and C13). This will likely result in serious harm to fishes as a result of the destruction of a maximum of 300 m2 in Redside Dace habitat within Patterson Richvale sites, resulting from the construction and installation of a new bank using a vegetated rock buttress. Incidental harm or potential death of species at risk could also occur due to the fish salvage that will be required at the same nine sites listed above.
  • Explanation for issuing other simliar documents(#20-HCAA-01230 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2020-08-21)

    The proposed project of which the work, undertaking, or activity authorized is a part of involves the realignment of the existing channel of Carruthers Creek nearest to Ajax, Ontario, to address current pipeline exposure and depth of cover issues, which if left unaddressed would have a high likelihood of failure, resulting in health, environment, and safety concerns associated with the exposed pipeline. Due to these concerns, this project has been elevated to emergency status. The emergency works will involve moving the S-shaped portion of the channel towards Concession Road 5, shifting the first meander bend north by approximately 14 m and the second meander bend north by approximately 9 m. The pipe exposure is located within the first meander where the channel is eroding the south bank. Realignment of the channel is intended to address the existing erosion hazard, reduce the number of pipeline crossings, and decrease the total water crossing length from 30 m to 6 m, minimizing the risk of future pipeline exposures. In-water work is anticipated to start on August 24, 2020 and conclude on September 15, 2020. This channel realignment will reduce the number of channel thalweg-pipeline crossings, and is intended to result in decreased risk of pipeline exposure, as well as decreased hazards to public and occupational safety, the environment, and economic consequences. The proposed channel realignments will incorporate riffle-pool sequencing similar to those observed in other reaches of each watercourse to keep the natural variability of the channel sinuosity to maintain the existing hydraulic and fluvial geomorphic conditions. The proposed project will result in the infilling of 306 m2 of existing fish habitat and removal of 1,541 m2 of vegetation adjacent to Carruthers Creek. Construction of the new channel will create 330 m2 of fish habitat and vegetation will be replanted in affected areas following construction. There is the potential for Redside Dace (Clinostomus elongatus) to be incidentally harmed during fish rescue operations, as works will require flow diversion, site isolation, and fish rescue/relocation in areas that Redside Dace and its habitat have previously been identified.
  • Explanation for issuing other simliar documents(#20-HCAA-01343 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2020-08-21)

    The proposed project for which the work, undertaking, or activity authorized is a part of involves the realignment of the existing channel of Ganatsekiagon Creek nearest to Pickering, Ontario, to address current pipeline exposure and depth of cover issues, which if left unaddressed would have a high likelihood of failure, resulting in health, environment, and safety concerns associated with the exposed pipeline. Due to these concerns, this project has been elevated to emergency status. The emergency works will involve moving the S-shaped portion of the channel by shifting the first meander bend north by approximately 10 m and the second meander bend north by approximately 3 m. The pipe exposure is located within the first meander where the channel is eroding the bed and outer bank. Realignment of the channel is intended to address the existing erosion hazard, reduce the number of pipeline crossings, and decrease the total water crossing length from 30 m to 6 m, minimizing the risk of future pipeline exposures. In-water work is anticipated to start on August 24, 2020 and conclude on September 15, 2020. This channel realignment will reduce the number of channel thalweg-pipeline crossings, and is intended to result in decreased risk of pipeline exposure, as well as decreased hazards to public and occupational safety, the environment, and economic consequences. The proposed channel realignments will incorporate riffle-pool sequencing similar to those observed in other reaches of each watercourse to keep the natural variability of the channel sinuosity to maintain the existing hydraulic and fluvial geomorphic conditions. The proposed project will result in the infilling of 403 m2 of existing fish habitat and removal of 2,886 m2 of vegetation adjacent to Ganatsekiagon Creek. Construction of the new channel will create 340 m2 of fish habitat and vegetation will be replanted in affected areas following construction. There is the potential for Redside Dace to be incidentally harmed during fish rescue operations, as works will require flow diversion and site isolation and fish rescue/relocation in areas that Redside Dace and its habitat have previously been identified.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#11-HCAA-CA4-01907 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-07-01)

    The objective of the activities covered by this permit is to conduct surveys at two reaches within East Huttonville Creek. Redside Dace (Clinostomus elongatus) may be encountered during this sampling. The activities authorized by this permit consist of: 1. The capture of Redside Dace with a backpack electrofisher within East Huttonville Creek through the use of a backpack electrofishing unit, using the Ontario Stream Assessment Protocol (OSAP) (Stanfield 2010) methodology; 2. The handling of Redside Dace for the purposes of identification and processing (count, photograph, etc.). Fishes will be identified, counted, photographed, and released alive with the exception of some smaller fishes that may be retained to confirm identification. All Redside Dace will be returned alive to the site of capture after processing; and, 3. The possession and transport of any dead Redside Dace killed incidentally, preserved in 10% formalin or 95% ethanol.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#15-HCAA-01035 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-07-01)

    The activity is being undertaken as part of the expansion of Major Mackenzie Drive West between Highway 50 and Highway 400 in Vaughan, Ontario. The works include replacement of the existing 4-cell perched concrete box culvert that conveys Purpleville Creek at Major Mackenzie Drive West with a single span bridge, and replacement of the existing single span bridge over the East Humber River with a three span bridge to accommodate roadway upgrades. Bank stabilization and channel realignment activities will also occur in both watercourses. The project was originally submitted to Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) in 2015 and a Letter of Advice (LOA; DFO File #: 15-HCAA-01035) was issued, prior to the federal listing of Redside Dace (Clinostomus elongatus) on Schedule 1 of the Species at Risk Act (SARA) as Endangered. Project works are currently ongoing, with works in and around fish habitat expected to commence in the summer of 2019. As such, a SARA permit is now required for the project. To achieve the project construction objectives, the proposed activities consist of conducting fish rescues where Redside Dace may be present. It is anticipated that at least four fish rescues (two per watercourse) will be needed to facilitate completion of in-water works. These activities may result in the incidental capture of Redside Dace during site isolation, dewatering, and fish relocation operations.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#17-HCAA-00203 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-09-12)

    The widening of Mayfield Road in the city of Brampton requires the removal of an existing arch culvert and the construction of a clear span bridge at crossing C18 over a tributary to the West Humber River, and the extension of a culvert at crossing C19. This section of the tributary to the West Humber River is identified as proposed critical habitat for Redside Dace (Clinostomus elongatus). The riparian and in-water habitat will be restored at the completion of construction as a requirement of the project's Overall Benefit permit with the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (MNRF). These works will require short-term in-water isolation, fish relocation, and dewatering, which may result in the incidental capture of Redside Dace.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#17-HCAA-01427 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-07-01)

    The activity is being undertaken to rehabilitate an existing elliptical structural corrugated steel pipe arch (SPCSPA) culvert that is corroded and deteriorating. The SPCSPA culvert (Site 10) and a concrete rigid frame culvert (Site No. 9) convey a tributary of Sixteen Mile Creek beneath Martin Street and a parking lot of a commercial car dealership in the Town of Milton, Ontario. The works involve lining/concrete paving of the culvert invert to stop the continued collapse. The proposed activities consist of conducting fish rescues where Redside Dace (Clinostomus elongatus) may be present. The project area is identified as future critical habitat in a draft recovery strategy; however, it was noted by the proponent that Redside Dace is unlikely to be encountered, as there has been no capture of this species in the area for ~20 years.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#17-HCAA-01559 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2020-06-22)

    The construction of Peter Matthews Boulevard, Pickering, Ontario, includes crossings at two Redside Dace (Clinostomus elongatus) occupied watercourses: a 46.0 m bridge spanning the meander belt of the main branch of Ganatsekiagon Creek (Crossing i-28) and a 50.3 m long by 8.0 m wide by 2.0 m high open-bottom concrete culvert in an unnamed tributary of Ganatsekiagon Creek (Crossing i-26). In association to the works, the proponent proposes to remove a 3 m high water control structure and its corresponding headwater pond upstream of Crossing i-26, and replace it with a natural channel. The natural channel design will include habitat features that benefit Redside Dace, a robust riparian zone, and a riffle-pool morphology along the 116 m section of the watercourse, which will extend upstream and downstream of the existing water control structure, and through the open-bottom culvert. The naturalization of the channel will restore favourable Redside Dace habitat within the project area. Site isolation will be required to complete the works in the dry, and there is the potential to incidentally harm Redside Dace during relocation activities.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#17-HCAA-01559 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2020-06-22)

    The construction of Peter Matthews Boulevard, Pickering, Ontario, includes crossings at two Redside Dace (Clinostomus elongatus) occupied watercourses: a 46.0 m bridge spanning the meander belt of the main branch of Ganatsekiagon Creek (Crossing i-28) and a 50.3 m long by 8.0 m wide by 2.0 m high open-bottom concrete culvert in an unnamed tributary of Ganatsekiagon Creek (Crossing i-26). In association to the works, the proponent proposes to remove a 3 m high water control structure and its corresponding headwater pond upstream of Crossing i-26, and replace it with a natural channel. The natural channel design will include habitat features that benefit Redside Dace, a robust riparian zone, and a riffle-pool morphology along the 116 m section of the watercourse, which will extend upstream and downstream of the existing water control structure, and through the open-bottom culvert. The naturalization of the channel will restore favourable Redside Dace habitat within the project area. Site isolation will be required to complete the works in the dry, and there is the potential to incidentally harm Redside Dace during relocation activities. Updated on September 11, 2020: Due to COVID-19 based working restrictions, onsite personnel was reduced from what was proposed, resulting in construction delays. Due to these delays, the proponent has requested for the ability to work within the restricted timing window for Redside Dace. The revised work schedule has the proponent requesting to conduct in-water work until October 31, 2020. All other aspects of the project will remain unchanged. While work is ongoing, fish passage will be maintained.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#18-­HCAA-­01252 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-05-16)

    The project will widen a 10.4 km section of Highway 404 from the 407 express toll route to Stouffville Road. The project will include a new stormwater management pond, outlet channel from the stormwater management pond to the Rouge River, and the replacement of the northbound and southbound Rouge River bridges with a single 65 m by 53.5 m clear­span bridge. Isolation of work will be needed as in­water work will be required for the removal of the existing bridge piles and the addition of channel protection under the new structure. Where the riparian habitat is disturbed or covered by the new bridge, native shade­tolerant species will be planted to replace the existing riparian vegetation, or rip rap will be installed. The areas identified for revegetation include: the edges of the bridge, the outflow of the spillway ditch to replace the loss of vegetation, and underneath the bridge. Bank protection will be provided by the addition of rip rap that will be placed under the newly covered median section and above (higher up the banks) the existing rip rap, and shade tolerant vegetation. Redside Dace (Clinostomus elongatus) is known to occupy the Rouge River, and fish relocations are required during the active construction. This activity may result in incidental harm to Redside Dace. Updated on September 4, 2020: Due to COVID-19 based working restrictions, onsite personnel were reduced from what was originally proposed, resulting in construction delays. Due to these delays, the proponent has requested for the ability to work within the restricted timing window for Redside Dace. The revised work schedule will utilize two cofferdams potentially being in the Rouge River until November 15, 2020. All other aspects of the project will remain unchanged. While work is ongoing, fish passage will be maintained. The Ontario Ministry of Environment Conservation and Protection has allowed for works being conducted until November 15, 2020.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#18-HCAA-00204 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-07-01)

    The proposed project involves widening Speers Road from 4 to 5 lanes, and constructing dedicated bike lanes, boulevards, and sidewalks on both sides of the corridor. The existing structure is a single-span (18.3 m wide x 11.9 m long) concrete rigid frame structure oriented in a north-south direction and skewed 55 degrees relative to the roadway. The proposed modifications to the bridge will require widening on both sides: 2.44 m on the north side and 3.96 m on the south of the bridge, for a total width of 24.7 m. The modification of one watercourse crossing structure will be required to accommodate the roadway widening. The sidewalks will be installed from the top of the structure by utilizing scaffolding suspended from the bridge deck, which will minimize disturbance to the creek bottom. In-water work will be required to rehabilitate the existing abutments with vegetation and for site clearing prior to construction works. Restoration of vegetation within the area will be completed. Coffer dams will only be built on the west bank. Water main relining will also take place at the crossing of Speers Road and Fourteen Mile Creek. The water main runs east to west. Works will include digging a hole on shore within the road to access and service the pipes. The works will occur inside the existing pipe; therefore, no disturbance is expected. The pits are located on the existing roadway, and will not disturb vegetation. No in-water work will be required. Fourteen Mile Creek is a fish-bearing watercourse where Redside Dace (Clinostomus elongatus) is known to be present, therefore a fish rescue will be required during the active construction. These activities may result in the incidental harm of Redside Dace during the fish rescue operation.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#18-HCAA-00503 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-06-05)

    The proposed activities include the construction of an extension of Cottrelle Boulevard from Humberwest Parkway to Goreway Drive in the City of Brampton, Ontario. The proposed extension covers a distance of approximately 700 m, and includes bridge crossings of two tributaries to the Humber River: the West Humber River in the east near Goreway Drive (Tributary B) and in the west adjacent to Humberwest Parkway (Tributary A). Single-span structures are proposed for each of the tributaries; a 30 m span over Tributary A and a 40 m span over Tributary B. Retaining walls shall be used for road approaches to structure abutments within the provincially regulated habitat for Redside Dace (Clinostomus elongatus). The structures are designed to avoid encroachment into the active stream, eliminating the need for a stream realignment. The proposed right-of-way width for the extension of Cottrelle Boulevard is 30 m. As part of the detailed design and finalization of the road construction, an updated survey of the two tributaries was completed in 2016; the original survey on which the design was based was completed in 2010. The 2016 survey revealed that the west abutment of the Tributary B single span structure encroaches into the active stream, destroying 300 m2 of fish habitat (west bank at water's edge). As such, in-water work that may result in direct harm to Redside Dace is required to complete the project and protect and stabilize the channel by training the channels to prevent further migration. Further to proposed in-water works, land-based activities near the watercourse (clearing, grading, etc.) during construction may have indirect adverse effects on the species.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#18-HCAA-00796 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2021-07-01)

    The proposed project includes replacement of an existing box culvert with one main culvert and two overflow culverts at Mile 24.98 along the Barrie Rail Corridor, and is a part of the Barrie Rail Corridor Expansion Project. The culverts will be installed using punch-and-bore methodology and a temporary road crossing downstream of the existing crossing will be required for site access. The immediate downstream section will be widened to accommodate flow through the overflow culverts. The works also include the installation of riprap at the culvert inlets and outlets, as well as placement of boulders within the main culvert to accommodate passage. This section of the East Humber River, closest to King City, Ontario, is considered to be Occupied Habitat for Redside Dace (Clinostomus elongatus), and the species may be captured during fish relocation activities.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#18-HCAA-01004), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-09-12)

    The activity is being undertaken to widen Queen Street West between Mississauga Road and Chinguacousy Road, in Brampton, Ontario. The works involve replacing five culverts over five watercourse crossings in Redside Dace (Clinostomus elongatus) habitat to accommodate the roadway upgrades. The project was originally submitted to Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) in 2014 (DFO file No. 14-HCAA-01241) and was determined not to need regulatory review. When Redside Dace was listed as Endangered under the Species at Risk Act (SARA) in 2017, the proponent applied for a SARA permit to conduct the fish relocations. As the SARA permit associated with DFO file No. 14-HCAA-01241 expired in 2017, a new SARA permit was required for the project in 2018.
  • >> See more Permits and Related Agreements documents

Consultation Documents

  • Consultation Workbook on the addition of the Redside Dace to the SARA List (2007-12-27)

    Your opinion is being sought to assist the government of Canada in making an informed decision on whether to add the (Redside Dace) to the Schedule 1 (the List of Wildlife Species at Risk) of the Species at Risk Act (SARA). Your input on the impacts of adding this species to the List is important. This workbook has been developed to give you an opportunity to provide Fisheries and Oceans Canada with your feedback, advice, and other comments regarding adding this species to Schedule 1 of SARA (Schedule 1 identifies which species are legally protected under SARA).
Date modified: