Species Profile

Roell's Brotherella Moss

Scientific Name: Brotherella roellii
Taxonomy Group: Mosses
COSEWIC Range: British Columbia
COSEWIC Assessment Date and Status Change: November 2010
COSEWIC Status: Endangered
COSEWIC Status Criteria: C2a(i); D1
COSEWIC Reason for Designation:

This moss is endemic to western North America, where all known extant populations occur in the densely populated south-western mainland area of British Columbia. Extensive collecting within and beyond this region has shown this species to occur only on hardwoods and rotten logs in remnant second-growth stands within urban areas. Twenty-nine individuals are known from nine of the 26 extant locations that have recently been verified. The species is subject to pressures from recreational use, road construction and urban, agricultural, resource and industrial development, all of which threaten the quantity of its preferred habitat and host trees and logs, as well as the quality of these habitats in terms of moisture levels and air quality.
COSEWIC History of Status Designation: Designated Endangered in November 2010.
SARA Status: Schedule 1, Endangered
Date of Listing (yyyy-mm-dd): 2018-05-30

Please note that this information is provided for general information purposes only. For the most up to date and accurate list of species listed under the Species at Risk Act, please see the Justice Laws Website.

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Quick Links: | Description | Habitat | Biology | Threats | Protection | Recovery Team | National Recovery Program | Documents

Description

Roell’s Brotherella Moss(Brotherella roellii)is a small, yellow to golden green, shiny moss that forms turf-like mats; leafy shoots small, ca. 0.5 mm, somewhat flattened, (not complanate); reproduction is via spores or occasionally deciduous flagelliferous shoots. Populations of Roell’s Brotherella Moss in British Columbia currently represent the only known extant sites in the world. [Updated by COSEWIC - Nov. 2010]

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Distribution and Population

Roell’s Brotherella Moss is a Western North American endemic known only from southwestern British Columbia and Washington State. Today Roell’s Brotherella Moss is known from only 26 current and 4 historical records, isolated locations within the Lower Mainland of the Fraser River and Howe Sound area. There are only six known locations in Washington State, all historical, thus B. roellii may now be endemic to Canada. Twenty-seven locations and 4 historical locations are reported for Roell’s Brotherella Moss in Canada after 134 years of collections. The four historical sites are considered extirpated. In addition, two extant locations have been severely damaged and one colony at one location has been destroyed. Nine new locations have been recently discovered. The population size and trends for the remaining 15 locations have not been confirmed because detailed locality information was not available. [Updated by COSEWIC - Nov. 2010]

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Habitat

In Canada, Roell’s Brotherella Moss occurs in cool, humid mixed deciduous and conifer, second-growth forests on stream terraces, swampy floodplains, and occasionally in ravines with creeks. Many of the current locations occur within city parks. The primary substratums include: alder, big leaf maple, dogwood trees, rotten logs and stumps. [Updated by COSEWIC - Nov. 2010]

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Biology

This species needs high levels of humidity in order to survive as evidenced by the species’ microhabitat: rotten wood, which holds moisture well, and on tree trunks in floodplain areas or along creeks. Reproduction is via spores or deciduous flagelliferous shoots. [Updated by COSEWIC - Nov. 2010]

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Threats

Threats to this species include: urbanization, industrialization, agricultural development, mining, construction of pipelines, roads, trails, and air pollution. The highly fragmented nature of its distribution indicates that dispersal may be limited despite this plant’s ability to produce spores. [Updated by COSEWIC - Nov. 2010]

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Protection

Federal Protection

The Roell's Brotherella Moss is protected under the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA). More information about SARA, including how it protects individual species, is available in the Species at Risk Act: A Guide.

Provincial and Territorial Protection

To know if this species is protected by provincial or territorial laws, consult the provinces' and territories' websites.

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Recovery Team

Team for Roell's Brotherella Moss

  • Brenda Costanzo - Chair/Contact - Government of BC
    Phone: 250-387-9611  Fax: 250-356-9145  Send Email

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Documents

PLEASE NOTE: Not all COSEWIC reports are currently available on the SARA Public Registry. Most of the reports not yet available are status reports for species assessed by COSEWIC prior to May 2002. Other COSEWIC reports not yet available may include those species assessed as Extinct, Data Deficient or Not at Risk. In the meantime, they are available on request from the COSEWIC Secretariat.

8 record(s) found.

COSEWIC Status Reports

  • COSEWIC Assessment and Status Report on the Roell’s Brotherella Moss Brotherella roellii in Canada (2011-09-09)

    Roell’s Brotherella Moss (Brotherella roellii) is a small, yellow to golden green, shiny moss that forms turf-like mats; leafy shoots small, ca. 0.5 mm, somewhat flattened, (not complanate); reproduction is via spores or occasionally deciduous flagelliferous shoots. Populations of Roell’s Brotherella Moss in British Columbia currently represent the only known extant sites in the world.

Response Statements

  • Response Statement - Roell's Brotherella Moss (2011-12-08)

    This moss is endemic to western North America, where all known extant populations occur in the densely populated south-western mainland area of British Columbia. Extensive collecting within and beyond this region has shown this species to occur only on hardwoods and rotten logs in remnant second-growth stands within urban areas. Twenty-nine individuals are known from nine of the 26 extant locations that have recently been verified. The species is subject to pressures from recreational use, road construction and urban, agricultural, resource and industrial development, all of which threaten the quantity of its preferred habitat and host trees and logs, as well as the quality of these habitats in terms of moisture levels and air quality.

Recovery Strategies

  • Recovery Strategy for the Roell’s Brotherella Moss (Brotherella roellii) in Canada (2021-12-16)

    The Minister of Environment and Climate Change is the competent minister under SARA for the Roell’s Brotherella Moss and has prepared the federal component of this recovery strategy (Part 1), as per section 37 of SARA. To the extent possible, it has been prepared in cooperation with the province of British Columbia as per section 39(1) of SARA. SARA section 44 allows the Minister to adopt all or part of an existing plan for the species if it meets the requirements under SARA for content (sub-sections 41(1) or (2)). The Province of British Columbia provided the attached recovery plan for the Roell’s Brotherella Moss (Part 2) as science advice to the jurisdictions responsible for managing the species in British Columbia. It was prepared in cooperation with Environment and Climate Change Canada. In light of the current Covid-19 pandemic, the 60-day public comment period on the proposed Recovery Strategy for the Roell’s Brotherella Moss (Brotherella roellii) in Canada has been extended to 90 days to provide sufficient time for feedback.

Orders

COSEWIC Annual Reports

  • COSEWIC Annual Report - 2010 - 2011 (2011-09-09)

    Under Canada’s Species at Risk Act (SARA), the foremost function of COSEWIC is to “assess the status of each wildlife species considered by COSEWIC to be at risk and, as part of the assessment, identify existing and potential threats to the species”. COSEWIC held two Wildlife Species Assessment Meetings during the past year assessing the status or reviewing the classification of a total of 92 wildlife species.

Consultation Documents

  • Consultation on Amending the List of Species under the Species at Risk Act: Terrestrial Species – December 2011 (2011-12-08)

    As part of its strategy for protecting wildlife species at risk, the Government of Canada proclaimed the Species at Risk Act (SARA) on June 5, 2003. Attached to the Act is Schedule 1, the list of the species that receive protection under SARA, also called the List of Wildlife Species at Risk. Please submit your comments by February 8, 2012 for species undergoing normal consultations and by November 8, 2012 for species undergoing extended consultations.

Related Information

  • Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Species at Risk Act (SARA) Listing Plan 2016 to 2018 (2017-09-29)

    The status of wildlife species is assessed by an independent panel of expert Canadian scientists, the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC). 149 terrestrial species were assessed as at-risk by COSEWIC between 2009 and 2016 and are eligible for listing under the Species at Risk Act (SARA) to be considered by the Governor-in-Council (GIC) on the recommendation of the Minister of the Environment: 86 species would be new additions, 54 currently listed species would be reclassified and 9 species would be updated to reflect changes in their recognized designatable units. A three-year listing plan has been developed to address all 149 terrestrial species and listing decisions for most species are anticipated by the end of 2018. Making amendments to Schedule 1 of SARA is a two-step process. The first step is for the GIC to propose an amendment through an order in council published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, for a 30-day public comment period. The second step is for the GIC to make a final decision on whether or not to make amendments to Schedule 1 of SARA, taking into consideration comments received during the 30-day public comment period. The amendments are made through an order in council published in the Canada Gazette, Part II. Both orders are accompanied by a Regulatory Impact Analysis Statement (RIAS) which presents the implications of listing the species or changing their status. Publishing this plan on the Species at Risk Public Registry is intended to provide transparency about the Government of Canada’s plan to make listing decisions under the Species at Risk Act. NOTE: The information presented below is intended to provide openness and transparency with respect to when terrestrial species might be considered for listing under Schedule 1 of the Species at Risk Act. It is intended to assist anyone who may wish to provide comments on such listing considerations. Given any number of factors can affect the timing of a listing decision; the Plan is subject to change. Accordingly, the Plan will be periodically updated.
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