Species Profile

Silver Chub Great Lakes - Upper St. Lawrence populations

Scientific Name: Macrhybopsis storeriana
Other/Previous Names: Silver Chub (Great Lakes - Western St. Lawrence populations)
Taxonomy Group: Fishes
COSEWIC Range: Ontario
COSEWIC Assessment Date and Status Change: May 2012
COSEWIC Status: Endangered
COSEWIC Status Criteria: A2bce; B2ab(v)
COSEWIC Reason for Designation: This small-bodied fish is native to the middle Great Lakes and has a small distribution range in Canada. Its abundance has declined substantially over the past ten years. Moreover, the longest consecutive time series of lowest abundance has been observed over the last five years. The species is assessed at high risk of extirpation from several threats including habitat degradation, competition with invasive exotic species, and climate change. This species is considered at risk in several border states, including Michigan and New York.
COSEWIC History of Status Designation: The species was considered a single unit and designated Special Concern in April 1985. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2001. Split into two populations in May 2012. The "Great Lakes - Upper St. Lawrence populations" unit was designated Endangered in May 2012.
SARA Status: Schedule 1, Endangered
Date of Listing (yyyy-mm-dd): 2003-06-05

Please note that this information is provided for general information purposes only. For the most up to date and accurate list of species listed under the Species at Risk Act, please see the Justice Laws Website.

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Quick Links: | Photo | Description | Habitat | Biology | Threats | Protection | Other Protection or Status | National Recovery Program | Documents

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Silver Chub Photo 1

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Description

The Silver Chub (Macrhybopsis storeriana) is a member of the Minnow family (Cyprinidae), and is the only species of the genus Macrhybopsis in Canada. It has the following characteristics: Body is stout and thick; average length is 100 to 150 millimeters long; maximum length is 231 millimeters; coloured pale grey-green on the back, becoming silver on the sides and silvery white below; a faint lateral band is usually present; moderate-sized subterminal mouth, and a snout that projects beyond the mouth; slender barbel, usually present at the end of the maxillary (corner of the upper jaw); eye diameter is relatively large; and caudal fin is distinctly forked and lightly pigmented, except for lower three-to-four rays, which are white.

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Distribution and Population

The range of the Silver Chub extends from Lake Winnipeg, east into the Great Lakes basin, and then south, largely through the Mississippi River system from Minnesota to the Gulf of Mexico. In Canada, the Great Lakes-Upper St. Lawrence populations are found in the Great Lakes basin, limited to Lake Erie and Lake St. Clair and the extreme southern portion of Lake Huron. The Saskatchewan-Nelson River populations (reassessed in 2012 as “Not at Risk”) are found in southern Lake Winnipeg and in the Assiniboine and Red river drainages of Manitoba, North and South Dakota and Minnesota.

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Habitat

In Ontario, Silver Chub is found in large lakes and connecting rivers at depths of 7.6–12 meters, although they have been caught as deep as 20 meters. Substrate is typically silt or sand, but the species is also sometimes associated with hard substrates, such as gravel, rubble, boulder or bedrock. It is not typically associated with aquatic vegetation.

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Biology

Reproduction of the Silver Chub is poorly understood. Individuals mature at age 1, and live to 3-to-4 years of age. One female can produce as many as 12,000 eggs. Silver Chub spawn in spring or early summer (May to July) at water temperatures between 19–23 degrees Celsius; however, there is uncertainty regarding where the species spawns and its spawning habitat requirements. In Lake Erie, the species has been observed to leave open water and move into near shore areas in early spring, possibly to begin spawning.

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Threats

The Silver Chub was considered common in Lake Erie until the 1950s. Its rapid decline in the 1960s coincided with habitat degradation and eutrophication caused by urban and agricultural runoff. The effects included poor water quality, extensive algal blooms and depleted oxygen levels in the water. Effects on invertebrate populations reduced prey sources. Although some threats have decreased in recent years (e.g., nutrient loading in Lake Erie), many still exist. Recent threats include aquatic invasive species, baitfish harvesting and climate change. Recent studies also suggest that the population numbers have dropped substantially in the past decade, and the risk of extirpation (i.e., extinct in Canada) is high.

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Protection

Federal Protection

The Silver Chub, Great Lakes - Upper St. Lawrence populations, is protected under the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA). More information about SARA, including how it protects individual species, is available in the Species at Risk Act: A Guide.

The Silver Chub (Great Lakes-Upper St. Lawrence populations) has been recently reassessed from Special Concern to Endangered by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC). In 2012, COSEWIC split the populations into two separate units: 1) the Saskatchewan - Nelson River; and 2) the Great Lakes - Upper St. Lawrence. The Saskatchewan - Nelson River populations are not considered by COSEWIC to be at risk. Based on its previous assessment, the Silver Chub is currently listed under the federal Species at Risk Act as Special Concern. More information about SARA, including how it protects individual species, is available online at AquaticSpeciesAtRisk.ca or on the SARA Registry at SaraRegistry.gc.ca.

Provincial and Territorial Protection

To know if this species is protected by provincial or territorial laws, consult the provinces' and territories' websites.

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Other Protection or Status

A management plan has been completed for the Silver Chub (2012) that identifies the conservation activities and land use measures needed to ensure, at a minimum, that a species of special concern does not become threatened or endangered. This management plan has benefited from the existing recovery strategy for the Essex-Erie region (an area that includes western Lake Erie, the Detroit River and the southern shores of Lake St. Clair), which includes the Silver Chub. Some measures have already been taken that will directly or indirectly benefit the species, such as the Lake Winnipeg Action Plan, which aims to reduce nitrogen and phosphorous levels in the lake, as well as existing monitoring programs that provide population data on Silver Chub populations.

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Documents

PLEASE NOTE: Not all COSEWIC reports are currently available on the SARA Public Registry. Most of the reports not yet available are status reports for species assessed by COSEWIC prior to May 2002. Other COSEWIC reports not yet available may include those species assessed as Extinct, Data Deficient or Not at Risk. In the meantime, they are available on request from the COSEWIC Secretariat.

18 record(s) found.

COSEWIC Status Reports

  • COSEWIC assessment and status report on the Silver Chub Macrhybopsis storeriana in Canada (2013-01-03)

    The Silver Chub (Macrhybopsis storeriana) is characterized by the presence of a slender barbel at the corners of the mouth, a rounded snout that greatly overhangs the mouth, a large eye on the upper half of the head, fewer than 50 lateral line scales, silvery sides lacking markings and an anteriorly located dorsal fin. It reaches a maximum length of 231 mm total length.

Response Statements

  • Response Statement - Silver Chub, Great Lakes - Upper St. Lawrence populations (2013-01-03)

    This small-bodied fish is native to the middle Great Lakes and has a small distribution range in Canada. Its abundance has declined substantially over the past ten years. Moreover, the longest consecutive time series of lowest abundance has been observed over the last five years. The species is assessed at high risk of extirpation from several threats including habitat degradation, competition with invasive exotic species, and climate change. This species is considered at risk in several border states, including Michigan and New York.

Orders

  • Order Amending Schedule 1 to the Species at Risk Act (Volume 153, Number 17, 2019) (2019-08-21)

    Biodiversity is rapidly declining at all scales, from local to global, as a result of a variety of human activities that increase the rates of species extinction. Current extinction rates are estimated to be between 1 000 and 10 000 times higher than the natural background rate. Higher species diversity positively supports healthy and productive ecosystems that are more resilient to disturbances, and, given the interdependency of species, a loss of biodiversity can lead to a declining resilience of ecosystem functions and services (e.g. natural processes such as pest control, pollination, coastal wave attenuation, pharmaceutical products, temperature regulation and carbon fixing). These services are vital to the health of all Canadians and are important for Canada’s economic well-being. Biodiversity loss can therefore result in adverse, irreversible and broad-ranging effects on Canadians.

COSEWIC Annual Reports

  • COSEWIC Annual Report - 2011-2012 (2012-10-05)

    Under Canada’s Species at Risk Act (SARA), the foremost function of COSEWIC is to “assess the status of each wildlife species considered by COSEWIC to be at risk and, as part of the assessment, identify existing and potential threats to the species”. COSEWIC held two Wildlife Species Assessment Meetings in this reporting year (September 1, 2011 to September 30, 2012) from November 21 to 25, 2011 and from April 29 to May 4, 2012. On February 3, 2012, an Emergency Assessment Subcommittee of COSEWIC also assessed the status of the Tri-colored Bat (Perimyotis subflavus), the Little Brown Myotis (Myotis lucifugus), and the Northern Myotis (Myotis septentrionalis). During the current reporting period COSEWIC assessed the status or reviewed the classification of 67 wildlife species. For species already found on Schedule 1 of SARA, the classification of 32 species was reviewed by COSEWIC and the status of the wildlife species was confirmed to be in the same category (extirpated - no longer found in the wild in Canada but occurring elsewhere, endangered, threatened or of special concern). The wildlife species assessment results for the 2011-2012 reporting period include the following: Extinct: 1 Extirpated: 4 Endangered: 29 Threatened: 10 Special Concern: 15 Data Deficient: 2 Not at Risk: 6 Total: 67 Of the 67 wildlife species examined, COSEWIC reviewed the classification of 49 species that had been previously assessed. The review of classification for 26 of those species resulted in a confirmation of the same status as the previous assessment (see Table 1a).

Permits and Related Agreements

  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-PCAA-00027 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-08-21)

    The objective of the activities covered by the permit are to conduct fish and mussel surveys in the St. Clair River watershed and the Lake St. Clair watershed. Baseline data collected will be used to assist in future project proposals and inquiries. Species at risk listed on the permit may be captured during surveys. The activities authorized by the permit consist of: 1. The capture of any of the species listed on the permit from the watersheds listed on the permit. Sampling will be completed through the use of a backpack electrofishing unit, seine net, or minnow traps where necessary, using the Ontario Stream Assessment Protocol (OSAP). Mussel surveys will adhere to Mackie et al. (2008); 2. The handling of any of the species listed on the permit for the purposes of identification and processing. Fishes will be identified, counted, and released alive with the exception of some smaller fishes that may be retained to confirm identification. All mussels will be returned alive to the locations they were found; and, 3. The possession and transport of any species listed on the permit killed incidentally or for vouchering purposes.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-PCAA-00030 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-08-21)

    The objective of the activities covered by the permit are to conduct a survey for Pugnose Minnow (Opsopoeodus emiliae) in southwestern Ontario waterbodies. This survey would consist of seining wadeable habitats with bag seines and non-wadeable habitats with boat seines. Sampling may also result in the incidental capture of Silver Chub (Macrhybopsis storeriana) (Great Lakes - Upper St. Lawrence populations) . The activities authorized by the permit consist of: 1. The capture of Pugnose Minnow from the locations listed on the permit (Canard River, Lake St. Clair, North Sydenham River, East Sydenham River, Maxwell Creek, Little Bear Creek, and Lake St. Clair and tributaries) using bag and/or boat seine nets; 2. The incidental capture of Silver Chub from the locations listed on the permit using bag and/or boat seine nets; 3. The handling of Pugnose Minnow and Silver Chub for the purposes of identification (count, measure, and photograph). With the exception of vouchers that may be retained to confirm identification, all fishes will be released alive after processing. Vouchers will be collected using digital cameras but some vouchers of smaller fishes may be retained, in 10% formalin, to confirm identification (if digital vouchers cannot be collected); and, 4. The possession and transport of Pugnose Minnow and/or Silver Chub killed incidentally or for vouchering purposes.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-PCAA-00053 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-08-21)

    The objective of the activities covered by the permit are to conduct a fish community assessment in the Detroit and St. Clair rivers. Surveys will take place from August to September of 2019. The species listed on the permit may be captured during the course of the work. The activities authorized by the permit consist of: 1. The capture of the species listed on the permit from the Detroit and St. Clair rivers. Sampling will be conducted using a boat electrofishing unit (waters 3 m deep), and large-mesh gill nets (1.8 m tall x 50 m long; 38-127 mm mesh). Twenty randomly selected sites will be sampled in each river; 2. The handling of the species listed on the permit for the purposes of identification and processing (count, measure, and photograph). With the exception of vouchers that may be retained to confirm identification, all fishes will be released alive after processing. Vouchers will be collected using digital cameras but some vouchers of smaller fishes may be retained, in 10% formalin, to confirm identification (if digital vouchers cannot be collected); and, 3. The possession and transport of species listed on the permit killed incidentally or for vouchering purposes.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-PCAA-00054 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-08-21)

    The objective of the activities covered by the permit are to evaluate the biological condition of all Great Lakes Coastal wetlands greater than 4 ha. Surveys include census (by different specialized teams) of avifauna, amphibians, fishes, macrophytes, aquatic invertebrates, and water quality. Species listed on the permit may be captured incidentally during the course of the work. The activities authorized by the permit consist of: 1. The capture of the species listed on the permit from the locations listed on the permit using fyke nets. Three replicate fyke nets will be placed in each of up to four dominant vegetation zones per wetland for a single night (up to 24 h) during the season. The maximum fishing effort at any site would be 12 nets for 24 h; 2. The handling of the species listed on the permit for the purposes of identification and processing (count, measure, photograph, etc.). With the exception of vouchers that may be retained to confirm identification, all fishes will be released alive after processing. Vouchers will be collected using digital cameras, but some vouchers of smaller fishes may be retained to confirm identification (if digital vouchers cannot be collected); and, 3. The possession and transport of species listed on the permit killed incidentally or for vouchering purposes.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-PCAA-00056 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-08-21)

    The objective of the activities covered by the permit are to conduct early detection surveillance sampling for Asian carps in nearshore areas and tributaries of the Canadian waters of the Great Lakes basin. A total of 36 early detection sites have been selected in the Great Lakes basin. The species listed on the permit may be captured incidentally during the course of work. The activities authorized by the permit consist of: 1. The capture of the species listed on the permit from the locations listed on the permit using fyke nets, gill nets, hoopnets, trap nets, trammel nets, light traps, boat electrofishing, boat seining, bongo nets, seine nets, backpack electrofishing, and/or trawling; 2. The handling of the species listed on the permit for the purposes of identification and processing (count and photograph). With the exception of vouchers that may be retained to confirm identification, all fishes will be released alive after processing. Vouchers will be collected using digital cameras, but some vouchers of smaller fishes may be retained to confirm identification if digital vouchers cannot be collected; and, 3. The possession and transport of the species listed on the permit killed incidentally or for vouchering purposes.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-PCAA-00057 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-08-21)

    The objective of the activities covered by the permit are to collect species at risk fishes in Ontario for Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) Species At Risk Network grant research on captive breeding. Captive rearing, life history, and reproduction of species at risk fishes will be studied at the University of Windsor by raising individuals in captivity and creating captive-bred offspring for study. The species listed on the permit may targeted or captured incidentally during the course of the work. The activities authorized by the permit include: 1. The capture of the species listed on the permit, via seine netting, at the locations listed on the permit; 2. The handling of the species listed on the permit for the purposes of identification (count, measure, buccal swabbing for DNA, and photograph). With the exception of specimens retained for captive breeding (a maximum of 30 individuals), all fishes will be released alive after processing; 3. The possession and transport of a maximum of 30 individuals of each species (if targeted) listed on the permit for captive-rearing experiments at the University of Windsor Freshwater Restoration Ecology Centre. For each species retained, a field determination of abundance shall be conducted to ensure that the population can support the loss of 30 individuals. Transport will be conducted using standard practices for fish transport, including a suitable truck-based container and oxygen supply. At the Freshwater Restoration Ecology Centre, there are specially designed tanks with ample space to raise small species at risk. The collected individuals will be housed within this system. Specimens will be cared for following the University of Windsor Animal Care Protocol AUPP 17-20; and, 4. The possession and transport of any specimens of any of the species listed on the permit killed incidentally or for vouchering purposes.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-PCAA-00058 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-08-23)

    The objective of the activities covered by the permit is to assess the fish community and habitat conditions within the St. Clair River Area of Concern. The species listed on this permit may be captured incidentally. The activities authorized by the permit consist of: 1. The incidental capture of species listed on this permit using fyke nets from the locations listed on this permit. Fyke nets will be set for 24 hours before being fished; 2. The handling of the species listed on this permit for the purposes of identification (count, measure, and photograph). With the exception of vouchers that may be retained to confirm identification, all fishes will be released alive after processing; and, 3. The possession and transport of any of the species listed on this permit killed incidentally or for vouchering purposes.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#20-PCAA-00001 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2020-02-03)

    The objectives of the activities covered by this permit are to determine the distribution and habitat preferences of native and non-native benthic fishes from southern Lake Huron through western Lake Erie (including the St. Clair River, Lake St. Clair, and Detroit River). Channel Darter (Percina copelandi) (Lake Erie populations), Eastern Sand Darter (Ammocrypta pellucida) (Ontario populations), Northern Madtom (Noturus stigmosus), and Silver Chub (Macrhybopsis storeriana) (Great Lakes - Upper St. Lawrence populations) may be captured during these surveys. The activities authorized by this permit consist of: 1. The capture of the species listed on the permit from the watersheds listed on the permit using minnow traps, trawls, larval drift nets, fyke nets, boat electrofishing, and gill nets; 2. The handling of the species listed on the permit for the purposes of identification and processing (count, measure, photograph, etc.). Fishes collected will be identified, counted and released alive, with the exception of some smaller fishes that may be retained to confirm identification; and, 3. The possession and transport of any species listed on the permit killed incidentally or for vouchering purposes.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#20-PCAA-00007 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2020-03-16)

    Under the guidance of Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO), the activity involves: 1) establishing a network of permanent monitoring stations throughout historical and present ranges of the Sydenham River, to permit tracking of fish populations, analysis of trends and patterns, and permit the evaluation of recovery actions; 2) establishing and implementing a habitat monitoring program that includes water quality and substrate components. The monitoring program will provide insight into the significance of threat factors. Targeted species at risk fish sampling will be conducted in historically occupied habitat (river reaches in the vicinity of Florence and Alvinston), as well as other potentially suitable habitats, using sampling techniques proven to detect species at risk fishes; and, 3) starting in 2020 and following the guidance of DFO, conduct a spatial pattern study of mussel distribution by completing a systematic survey in a specific reach (or reaches) in order to better understand population abundance/density and species-to-habitat relationships in the Sydenham The St. Clair Region Conservation Authority (SCRCA) will collect fishes using a backpack electrofishing unit, seine net, or minnow traps where necessary, using the Ontario Stream Assessment Protocol. Mussel surveys will adhere to protocol found in Mackie et al. (2008). Fifteen sites will be monitored according to the Ontario Benthos Biomonitoring Network Protocol. At each site, this protocol involves using the travelling kick and sweep method for three minutes, covering an area of about 10 m2 at three transects (optimally riffle-pool-riffle) within a stream meander wavelength. The sites are selected to represent the main watercourse. Each of the small watercourses has at least one sampling site.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#20-PCAA-00036 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2020-07-23)

    The objectives of the activities covered by the permit are to conduct fish community surveys in the lower Thames River and its tributaries, within the jurisdiction of the Lower Thames River Conservation Authority, in Ontario. The species listed on the permit may be captured incidentally during this work. The activities authorized by the permit consist of: 1. The capture of the species listed on the permit via seining (fishes) and quadrat/visual surveys (mussels), from the lower Thames River watershed; 2. The handling of the species listed on the permit for the purposes of identification (count, measure, and photograph). With the exception of vouchers that may be retained to confirm identification, all fishes will be released alive after processing. Any mussels captured will be released alive at the location of capture; and, 3. The possession and transport of the species listed on this permit killed incidentally as a result of sampling and/or processing or for vouchering purposes (fishes only).
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#21-PCAA-00009 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2021-03-10)

    The objectives of the activities covered by this permit include: 1. Establishing a network of permanent monitoring stations throughout the Sydenham River, in Ontario, to permit tracking of fish populations, analysis of trends and patterns, and permit the evaluation of recovery actions; 2. To conduct a spatial pattern study of mussel distribution by completing a systematic survey in a specific reach (or reaches) in order to better understand population abundance and density, and species to habitat relationships in the Sydenham River; and, 3. To conduct benthic sampling at fifteen sites according to the Ontario Benthos Biomonitoring Network Protocol. The mussels and fishes listed on the permit may be encountered incidentally during the work. The activities authorized by this permit consist of: 1. The capture of any of the species listed on the permit from the St. Clair River watershed and/or the Lake St. Clair watershed. Sampling will be completed through the use of a backpack electrofishing unit, seine net, or minnow traps where necessary, using the Ontario Stream Assessment Protocol. Mussel surveys will adhere to Mackie et al. (2008). Benthic surveys will employ the travelling kick-and-sweep method for three minutes, covering an area of about 10 m at three transects (optimally riffle-pool-riffle) within a stream meander wavelength; 2. The handling of any of the species listed on this permit for the purposes of identification and processing (count, measure, and photograph). Fishes will be identified, counted, and released alive, with the exception of some smaller fishes that may be retained to confirm identification. All mussels will be returned alive to the locations they were found; and, 3. The possession and transport of any species listed on this permit killed incidentally or for vouchering purposes.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#21-PCAA-00012 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2021-03-23)

    The objective of the activities covered by the permit is to determine the distribution and habitat preferences of native and non-native benthic fishes, from southern Lake Huron through western Lake Erie (including the St. Clair River, Lake St. Clair, and Detroit River). Black Redhorse (Moxostoma duquesnei), Channel Darter (Percina copelandi) (Lake Erie populations), Eastern Sand Darter (Ammocrypta pellucida) (Ontario populations), Northern Madtom (Noturus stigmosus), Pugnose Shiner (Notropis anogenus), and Silver Chub (Macrhybopsis storeriana) (Great Lakes - Upper St. Lawrence populations) may be captured during these surveys. The activities authorized by this permit consist of: 1. The capture of the species listed above from the watersheds listed above using minnow traps, trawls, larval drift nets, fyke nets, boat electrofishing, dozer trawl, trammel nets, and gill nets; 2. The handling of the species listed on the permit for the purposes of identification and processing (count, measure, and photograph). Fishes collected will be identified, counted, and released alive, with the exception of some smaller fishes that may be retained to confirm identification; and, 3. The possession and transport of any species listed on the permit killed incidentally or for vouchering purposes.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#21-PCAA-00022 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2021-05-05)

    The objectives of the activities covered by the permit include: 1. Conducting fish and mussel community surveys within locations in the lower Thames River watershed (from Delaware, ON, to the mouth), lower Thames River tributaries, Rondeau Bay and tributaries, McGeachy Pond, Lake Erie tributaries (between Two Creeks and Talbot Creek), and Lake St. Clair tributaries (between the mouth of the Thames River to Boyle Drain); and, 2. To conduct targeted seining surveys for Eastern Sand Darter (Ammocrypta pellucida) (Ontario populations) within the Thames River. The 19 species at risk (SAR) listed on the permit may be captured incidentally during this work. The activities authorized by the permit consist of: 1. The capture of the species listed on this permit via seining (fishes) and quadrat or visual surveys (mussels), from the locations listed previously; 2. The handling of the species listed on the permit for the purposes of identification (count, measure, and photograph). With the exception of vouchers that may be retained to confirm identification, all fishes will be released alive after processing. Any mussels captured will be released alive at the location of capture; and, 3. The possession and transport of the species listed on the permit killed incidentally as a result of sampling and/or processing, or for vouchering purposes.

Consultation Documents

  • Silver Chub (Great Lakes - Upper St. Lawrence populations) (2014-01-24)

    The Silver Chub (Great Lakes-Upper St. Lawrence populations) has been reassessed from Special Concern to Endangered by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC). In 2012, COSEWIC split the populations into two separate units: 1) the Saskatchewan - Nelson River; and 2) the Great Lakes - Upper St. Lawrence. The Saskatchewan - Nelson River populations are not considered to be at risk. Based on its previous assessment, the Silver Chub is currently listed under the federal Species at Risk Act as Special Concern. As a species of Special Concern, a management plan has been developed. The recent change in the COSEWIC assessment will require a new listing decision under the Species at Risk Act. If the population is legally upgraded to Endangered, a recovery strategy will be developed.
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