Species Profile

Broad-banded Forestsnail

Scientific Name: Allogona profunda
Taxonomy Group: Molluscs
COSEWIC Range: Ontario
COSEWIC Assessment Date and Status Change: November 2014
COSEWIC Status: Endangered
COSEWIC Status Criteria: B1ab(iii,v)+2ab(iii,v)
COSEWIC Reason for Designation: In Canada, this large terrestrial snail is known to exist only in Point Pelee National Park and on Pelee Island. An overabundance of nesting Double-crested Cormorants has most likely led to the loss of subpopulations on some small Lake Erie islands since the early 1980s; historical losses of woodlands and forests also occurred on the mainland and Pelee Island. Major continuing threats are from recreational activities and shoreline erosion. A possible threat is predation by introduced Wild Turkeys, which are rapidly increasing in numbers.
COSEWIC History of Status Designation: Designated Endangered in November 2014.
SARA Status: Schedule 1, Endangered
Date of Listing (yyyy-mm-dd): 2019-02-25

Please note that this information is provided for general information purposes only. For the most up to date and accurate list of species listed under the Species at Risk Act, please see the Justice Laws Website.

Go to advanced search

Quick Links: | Protection | National Recovery Program | Documents

Protection

Federal Protection

The Broad-banded Forestsnail is protected under the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA). More information about SARA, including how it protects individual species, is available in the Species at Risk Act: A Guide.

Provincial and Territorial Protection

To know if this species is protected by provincial or territorial laws, consult the provinces' and territories' websites.

Top

Documents

PLEASE NOTE: Not all COSEWIC reports are currently available on the SARA Public Registry. Most of the reports not yet available are status reports for species assessed by COSEWIC prior to May 2002. Other COSEWIC reports not yet available may include those species assessed as Extinct, Data Deficient or Not at Risk. In the meantime, they are available on request from the COSEWIC Secretariat.

11 record(s) found.

Reports on the Progress of Recovery Document Implementation

COSEWIC Status Reports

  • COSEWIC Assessment and Status Report on the Broad-banded Forestsnail Allogona profunda in Canada (2015-12-11)

    Broad-banded Forestsnail is a large (about 30 mm in diameter) terrestrial snail. Shells usually have a distinctive low tooth inside the lower lip of the aperture (shell opening) and a large open umbilicus (hole at the central part of the underside of the shell). The lip of the aperture is white and flares outward. The shell is pale yellow, often with pale brown bands, and the surface is sculptured with fine grooves. Canadian populations of Broad-banded Forestsnail may be genetically isolated from other populations and have significance for conservation.

Response Statements

  • Response Statement - Broad-banded Forestsnail (2015-12-23)

    In Canada, this large terrestrial snail is known to exist only in Point Pelee National Park and on Pelee Island. An overabundance of nesting Double-crested Cormorants has most likely led to the loss of subpopulations on some small Lake Erie islands since the early 1980s; historical losses of woodlands and forests also occurred on the mainland and Pelee Island. Major continuing threats are from recreational activities and shoreline erosion. A possible threat is predation by introduced Wild Turkeys, which are rapidly increasing in numbers.

Action Plans

  • Multi-species Action Plan for Point Pelee National Park of Canada and Niagara National Historic Sites of Canada (2016-07-05)

    The Multi-species Action Plan for Point Pelee National Park of Canada and the Niagara National Historic Sites of Canada applies to lands and waters occurring within the boundaries of the two sites: Point Pelee National Park of Canada (PPNP) and the Niagara National Historic Sites of Canada (NNHS). The NNHS is being used as a term to collectively refer to two locations in the Niagara region that consist of three National Historic Sites: Fort George National Historic Site, Battlefield of Fort George National Historic Site, and Butler’s Barracks National Historic Sites of Canada. The plan meets the requirements for action plans set out in the Species At Risk Act (SARA s.47) for species requiring an action plan and that regularly occur in these sites. Measures described in this plan will also provide benefits for other species of conservation concern that regularly occur at PPNP and at NNHS.

Orders

  • Order Acknowledging Receipt of the Assessments Done Pursuant to Subsection 23(1) of the Act: SI/2018-40 (2018-06-13)

    Her Excellency the Governor General in Council, on the recommendation of the Minister of the Environment, acknowledges receipt, on the making of this Order, of the assessments done pursuant to subsection 23(1) of the Species at Risk Act by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) with respect to the species set out in the annexed schedule.
  • Order Amending Schedule 1 to the Species at Risk Act (Volume 153, Number 5, 2019) (2019-03-06)

    Biodiversity is rapidly declining worldwide as species become extinct. Today’s extinction rate is estimated to be between 1 000 and 10 000 times higher than the natural rate. Biodiversity is positively related to ecosystem productivity, health and resiliency (i.e. the ability of an ecosystem to respond to changes or disturbances), and, given the interdependency of species, a loss of biodiversity can lead to decreases in ecosystem function and services (e.g. natural processes such as pest control, pollination, coastal wave attenuation, temperature regulation and carbon fixing). These services are important to the health of Canadians, and also have important ties to Canada’s economy. Small changes within an ecosystem can lead to a loss of individuals and species resulting in adverse, irreversible and broad-ranging effects.

COSEWIC Annual Reports

  • COSEWIC Annual Report - 2014-2015 (2015-11-20)

    Under Canada’s Species at Risk Act (SARA), the foremost function of COSEWIC is to "assess the status of each wildlife species considered by COSEWIC to be at risk and, as part of the assessment, identify existing and potential threats to the species". COSEWIC held two Wildlife Species Assessment Meetings in this reporting year (October, 2014 to September, 2015) from November 23 to November 28, 2014 and from April 27 to May 1, 2015. During the current reporting period, COSEWIC assessed the status or reviewed the classification of 56 wildlife species. The wildlife species assessment results for the 2014-2015 reporting period include the following: Extinct: 0 Extirpated: 1 Endangered: 21 Threatened: 11 Special Concern: 21 Data Deficient: 1 Not at Risk: 1 Total: 56 Of the 56 wildlife species examined, COSEWIC reviewed the classification of 40 that had been previously assessed. The review of classification for 24 of those wildlife species resulted in a confirmation of the same risk status as the previous assessment.

Permits and Related Agreements

  • Explanation for issuing permit(#PPNP-2018-28121), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2018-05-09)

    Biological and ecological data are currently deficient for the endangered Broad-banded Forestsnail (Allogona profunda) in Canada. The only known extant populations of Broad-banded Forestsnails are on Pelee Island and at Point Pelee National Park, and there are large knowledge gaps about their population sizes, structure, or genetics. The study aims to develop a standardized survey and monitoring protocol in Point Pelee National Park which will use visual surveys for snail/shell detection along transects. Where extant populations are discovered, individual snails will be marked with numbered bee tags on the underside of their shells and then mark-recapture methods will be used to generate estimates of population sizes and demographic rates. Individuals captured will be handled briefly for morphology measurements, and a non-destructive DNA sample before being returned to their exact location of capture.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#PPNP-2021-05), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2021-12-01)

    During the sewage treatment system replacements and upgrades at Point Pelee National Park, approximately 44 individual common hoptrees in/adjacent to the work area footprint may be cut, pruned, transplanted away from, and/or have their seeds collected and scattered in nearby suitable habitat. This has the potential to harm or kill any hoptree borers that are living in the trees. The project may also disturb, harm, and/or kill an unknown number of locally abundant broad-banded forestsnails living in the soil and leaf-litter near the septic systems.

Consultation Documents

  • Consultation on Amending the List of Species under the Species at Risk Act : Terrestrial Species - January 2016 (2016-01-08)

    The Government of Canada is committed to preventing the disappearance of wildlife species at risk from our lands. As part of its strategy for realizing that commitment, on June 5, 2003, the Government of Canada proclaimed the Species at Risk Act (SARA). Attached to the Act is Schedule 1, the list of the species provided for under SARA, also called the List of Wildlife Species at Risk. Extirpated, Endangered and Threatened species on Schedule 1 benefit from the protection of prohibitions and recovery planning requirements under SARA. Special Concern species benefit from its management planning requirements. Schedule 1 has grown from the original 233 to 521 wildlife species at risk. Please submit your comments byMay 4, 2016, for terrestrial species undergoing normal consultationsand byOctober 4, 2016, for terrestrial species undergoing extended consultations.For a description of the consultation paths these species will undergo, please see:Species at Risk Public Registry website

Related Information

  • Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Species at Risk Act (SARA) Listing Plan 2016 to 2018 (2017-09-29)

    The status of wildlife species is assessed by an independent panel of expert Canadian scientists, the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC). 149 terrestrial species were assessed as at-risk by COSEWIC between 2009 and 2016 and are eligible for listing under the Species at Risk Act (SARA) to be considered by the Governor-in-Council (GIC) on the recommendation of the Minister of the Environment: 86 species would be new additions, 54 currently listed species would be reclassified and 9 species would be updated to reflect changes in their recognized designatable units. A three-year listing plan has been developed to address all 149 terrestrial species and listing decisions for most species are anticipated by the end of 2018. Making amendments to Schedule 1 of SARA is a two-step process. The first step is for the GIC to propose an amendment through an order in council published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, for a 30-day public comment period. The second step is for the GIC to make a final decision on whether or not to make amendments to Schedule 1 of SARA, taking into consideration comments received during the 30-day public comment period. The amendments are made through an order in council published in the Canada Gazette, Part II. Both orders are accompanied by a Regulatory Impact Analysis Statement (RIAS) which presents the implications of listing the species or changing their status. Publishing this plan on the Species at Risk Public Registry is intended to provide transparency about the Government of Canada’s plan to make listing decisions under the Species at Risk Act. NOTE: The information presented below is intended to provide openness and transparency with respect to when terrestrial species might be considered for listing under Schedule 1 of the Species at Risk Act. It is intended to assist anyone who may wish to provide comments on such listing considerations. Given any number of factors can affect the timing of a listing decision; the Plan is subject to change. Accordingly, the Plan will be periodically updated.
Date modified: