Species Profile

Black Ash

Scientific Name: Fraxinus nigra
Taxonomy Group: Vascular Plants
COSEWIC Range: Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland and Labrador
COSEWIC Assessment Date and Status Change: November 2018
COSEWIC Status: Threatened
COSEWIC Status Criteria: Meets criteria for Endangered, A3ce+4ce, based on predicted areas of susceptibility, but designated Threatened, A3ce+4ce, due to factors including effectiveness of Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) bio-controls and EAB winter survivability, that may reduce mortality over the projected period.
COSEWIC Reason for Designation: Approximately 51% of the global range of this tree is found in Canada. Subpopulations in the central part of the distribution have been devastated by Emerald Ash Borer, an invasive beetle. This invasive species was first detected in Canada (Windsor, Ontario) in 2002 and has since expanded its range as far west as Winnipeg, Manitoba, and east to Bedford, Nova Scotia. Although it has caused a modest overall decline in known numbers of ash in New Brunswick, Quebec, Ontario, and Manitoba to date, projections indicate that mortality rates will be greater than 90%, and ~73% of the Canadian population is likely to be affected within one generation (60 years) under current climate conditions. Emerald Ash Borer bio-controls have been initiated in parts of southern Ontario and Quebec, but their effectiveness is uncertain. Consequently, Emerald Ash Borer is expected to expand farther into this species’ habitat with climate change.
COSEWIC History of Status Designation: Designated Threatened in November 2018.
SARA Status: No schedule, No Status
Date of Listing (yyyy-mm-dd):

No schedule - No Status

Individuals of this species may be protected under Schedule 1 under another name; for more information see Schedule 1, the A-Z Species List, or if applicable, the Related Species table below.

Please note that this information is provided for general information purposes only. For the most up to date and accurate list of species listed under the Species at Risk Act, please see the Justice Laws Website.

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Protection

Federal Protection

Provincial and Territorial Protection

To know if this species is protected by provincial or territorial laws, consult the provinces' and territories' websites.

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Documents

PLEASE NOTE: Not all COSEWIC reports are currently available on the SARA Public Registry. Most of the reports not yet available are status reports for species assessed by COSEWIC prior to May 2002. Other COSEWIC reports not yet available may include those species assessed as Extinct, Data Deficient or Not at Risk. In the meantime, they are available on request from the COSEWIC Secretariat.

5 record(s) found.

COSEWIC Status Reports

  • COSEWIC Assessment and Status Report on the Black Ash (Fraxinus nigra) in Canada (2019-10-09)

    Black Ash is a broad-leaved hardwood tree in the Olive family, growing to 15 to 20 m in height and 30 to 50 cm in diameter. The opposite, pinnately-compound leaves are 15 to 30 cm, with seven to 11 leaflets. The small flowers lack petals and sepals and appear in crowded clusters prior to leaf out. Fruit are elongated, winged samaras. Stalkless leaflets, samaras winged to the base, and a gap between the terminal and nearest lateral buds distinguish Black Ash from other ash species. Note: This COSEWIC assessment was received by the Minister on October 15th, 2018.

Response Statements

  • Response Statement - Black Ash (2020) (2020-01-07)

    COVID-19 and the consultations on the listing of species at risk As a result of the ongoing COVID 19 situation, it is not possible to have in-person meetings. Taking this into consideration, please note that consultation closing dates have been set for both the Normal and Extended consultations for the terrestrial species considered in this document. We will work to ensure that all the known, potentially affected parties have the opportunity to contribute to the consultations and that the consultation process is flexible and sensitive to the current context. If you wish to contribute, please submit your comments by April 2, 2021 for species undergoing normal consultations and by September 2, 2021 for species undergoing extended consultations. You may provide comments by email, letters, or through the online survey. Approximately 51% of the global range of this tree is found in Canada. Subpopulations in the central part of the distribution have been devastated by Emerald Ash Borer, an invasive beetle. This invasive species was first detected in Canada (Windsor, Ontario) in 2002 and has since expanded its range as far west as Winnipeg, Manitoba, and east to Bedford, Nova Scotia. Although it has caused a modest overall decline in known numbers of ash in New Brunswick, Quebec, Ontario, and Manitoba to date, projections indicate that mortality rates will be greater than 90%, and ~73% of the Canadian population is likely to be affected within one generation (60 years) under current climate conditions. Emerald Ash Borer bio-controls have been initiated in parts of southern Ontario and Quebec, but their effectiveness is uncertain. Consequently, Emerald Ash Borer is expected to expand farther into this species’ habitat with climate change.

Action Plans

  • Multi-species Action Plan for La Mauricie National Park and National Historic Sites of La Mauricie and Western Quebec regions (2020-10-06)

    The Multi-species Action Plan for La Mauricie National Park and Canada's national historic sites (NHS) that are part of the Mauricie and Western Quebec Field Unit (MWQFU) applies to the land and waters within the boundaries of La Mauricie National Park (LMNP) and 13 NHSs in Quebec: Obadjiwan–Fort Témiscamingue; Forges-du-Saint-Maurice; Fort Chambly; Fort Lennox; Battle of the Châteauguay; Coteau-du-Lac; Carillon Barracks; Manoir Papineau; Louis-Joseph Papineau; Louis S. St-Laurent; Fur Trade at Lachine National Historic Site; Sir Wilfrid Laurier; and Sir George-Étienne Cartier. This plan meets the requirements for action plans set out in the Species at Risk Act (SARA; section 47) for species requiring an action plan that regularly occur on these sites. Measures described in this plan will also provide benefits for other species of conservation concern that regularly occur in LMNP and on associated NHSs.

COSEWIC Annual Reports

  • COSEWIC Annual Report 2018 to 2019 (2019-10-09)

    Over the past year COSEWIC assessed a total of 56 wildlife species, 2 of which were assigned a status of not at risk. Of these 56, COSEWIC re-examined the status of 25 wildlife species; of these, the majority (80%) were reassessed at the same or lower level of risk. To date and with the submission of this report, COSEWIC’s assessments now include 799 wildlife species in various risk categories including 356 endangered, 189 threatened, 232 special concern, and 22 extirpated (that is, no longer found in the wild in Canada). In addition, 18 wildlife species have been assessed as extinct, 59 wildlife species have been designated as data deficient, and 199 have been assessed as not at risk.

Consultation Documents

  • Consultation on Amending the List of Species under the Species at Risk Act: Terrestrial Species January 2020 (2020-01-07)

    COVID-19 and the consultations on the listing of species at risk As a result of the ongoing COVID 19 situation, it is not possible to have in-person meetings. Taking this into consideration, please note that consultation closing dates have been set for both the Normal and Extended consultations for the terrestrial species considered in this document. We will work to ensure that all the known, potentially affected parties have the opportunity to contribute to the consultations and that the consultation process is flexible and sensitive to the current context. If you wish to contribute, please submit your comments by April 2, 2021 for species undergoing normal consultations and by September 2, 2021 for species undergoing extended consultations. You may provide comments by email, letters, or through the online survey. The Government of Canada is committed to preventing the disappearance of wildlife species at risk from our lands. As part of its strategy for realizing that commitment, on June 5, 2003, the Government of Canada proclaimed the Species at Risk Act (SARA). Attached to the Act is Schedule 1, the list of the species provided for under SARA, also called the List of Wildlife Species at Risk. Extirpated, Endangered and Threatened species on Schedule 1 benefit from the protection afforded by the prohibitions and from recovery planning requirements under SARA. Special Concern species benefit from its management planning requirements. Schedule 1 has grown from the original 233 to 622 wildlife species at risk. Please submit your comments by May 7, 2020, for terrestrial species undergoing normal consultations and by October 7, 2020, for terrestrial species undergoing extended consultations. For a description of the consultation paths these species will undergo, please visit the Species at Risk (SAR) Public Registry website at: The Minister of the Environment's Response to Species at Risk Assessments. To respond to survey questions, please go to the survey page.
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