Species Profile

Humpback Whale North Pacific population

Scientific Name: Megaptera novaeangliae
Taxonomy Group: Mammals
COSEWIC Range: Pacific Ocean
COSEWIC Assessment Date and Status Change: May 2011
COSEWIC Status: Special Concern
COSEWIC Status Criteria:
COSEWIC Reason for Designation: Although this recovering population is no longer considered to be Threatened, it is not yet secure. It was depleted by commercial whaling but has increased substantially since becoming legally protected from whaling in 1966. A basin-wide study in 2004-2006 resulted in an estimated abundance of 18,000 animals (not including first-year calves) in the North Pacific and an estimated rate of increase of 4.9 to 6.8%/year. Research conducted between 2004-06 indicated that about 2,145 whales (not including first-year calves) were present seasonally in British Columbia waters where they were increasing at around 4%/year. Current numbers are still considerably smaller than the minimum of 4,000 animals that must have been present off the west coast of Vancouver Island in 1905 given the numbers removed by whaling in the early 1900’s. This population in the eastern North Pacific continues to face several threats including noise disturbance, habitat degradation (especially on the breeding grounds), entanglement in fishing gear or debris, and ship strikes.   
COSEWIC History of Status Designation: The "Western North Atlantic and North Pacific populations" were given a single designation of Threatened in April 1982. Split into two populations in April 1985 (Western North Atlantic population and North Pacific population). The North Pacific population designated Threatened in 1985. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2003. Status re-examined and designated Special Concern in May 2011.
SARA Status: Schedule 1, Special Concern
Date of Listing (yyyy-mm-dd): 2003-06-05

Please note that this information is provided for general information purposes only. For the most up to date and accurate list of species listed under the Species at Risk Act, please see the Justice Laws Website.

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Quick Links: | Photo | Description | Distribution and Population | Habitat | Biology | Threats | Protection | Other Protection or Status | Recovery Initiatives | National Recovery Program | Documents

Image of Humpback Whale

Humpback Whale Photo 1

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Description

The Humpback Whale is one of the larger cetaceans, typically reaching lengths of 13 meters for males and 14 meters for females, and weighing 34 to 45 tonnes. It is a rorqual whale, characterized by pleated grooves in the skin of the neck that allow the throat to expand during feeding and the presence of a dorsal fin. The body of the Humpback Whale is black on the dorsal side, and mottled black and white on the ventral side. This colour pattern extends to the fluke (tail), where the distinctive markings are unique and allow for the identification of each individual whale. The genus of the Humpback Whale, Megaptera, means huge wings, and refers to its flippers. They can be up to one-third of the whale’s body length, and are the largest flippers of any whale. The head is broad and rounded when viewed from above, with small, round bumps (called knobs or tubercles) edging the jaws. Humpback Whales are active, acrobatic whales. They can throw themselves completely out of the water (breaching), and swim on their backs with both flippers in the air. They also have the tendency to raise their tail flukes above the surface when they dive.

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Distribution and Population

Humpback Whales are found in tropical, temperate and sub-polar waters worldwide. In Canada, Humpbacks are found on both the east and west coasts, and belong to separate populations. The range of the Western North Atlantic population of Humpback Whales extends north to Labrador. This Atlantic population was assessed by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) in 2003 and was designated as Not at Risk. The range of the North Pacific population extends along the full length of the west coast of British Columbia (B.C.) to northwestern Alaska. The most recent population estimate for the North Pacific Humpback Whale, based on data from 2004 to 2006, was 18,302 individuals. This dramatic increase from previous estimates of 6,000 individuals suggests that the population is recovering at a moderate rate of 4.9 to 6.8 percent annually. Despite this increase, current numbers are small compared to pre-whaling population estimates.

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Habitat

Humpback Whales migrate seasonally between high-latitude feeding areas in summer and low-latitude breeding and calving areas in winter. Canadian waters are used primarily for feeding and migrating to higher latitude feeding areas. B.C.’s highly productive waters serve as important summer feeding habitat and during this critical time, Humpbacks must build up their fat reserves to sustain them over the winter months.

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Biology

Humpbacks travel in large, loose groups. Most associations between Humpbacks are temporary, lasting at most a few days. The exception is the strong and lasting bond between mother and calves. Humpback Whales become sexually mature at around nine years of age but are not fully grown until they are between 12-18 years old. A female that mates one year on the winter breeding grounds will migrate to spend the summer feeding in colder waters, and then return to the breeding grounds to give birth. Female humpbacks generally have calves every one to five years. At birth, a calf is just over 4 meters long, and weighs about 1 tonne. It immediately starts feeding on its mother's rich milk, and quickly puts on weight. After about 10 months, when it has grown to around 8 meters long, the calf is weaned. The mother is then no longer involved in its upbringing, though mothers and their offspring are sometimes seen together in later years on feeding grounds. Humpback Whales feed on krill (shrimp-like crustaceans) and a variety of small schooling fish such as herring and sand lance. Humpbacks sometimes engage in bubble-netting, a form of social hunting, in which several whales encircle a school of fish and blow bubbles that form a “net” around the fish. The fish cluster tightly inside these nets, and all the whales have to do is to swim through with their mouths open. One of the best-known features of Humpback Whales is their singing. The males sing the longest and most complex songs in the animal kingdom. The songs are long, varied, and complex, including recognizable sequences of squeaks, grunts, and other sounds. The songs have the largest range of frequencies used by whales, ranging from 20 to 9000 Hertz. They usually sing the complex songs only in warm waters, perhaps for the purpose of attracting a mate. In cold waters, they make rougher sounds, scrapes and groans, perhaps to locate large masses of krill. All the male whales in a population will sing the same song; it evolves over time as new sounds are added and old ones discarded, and different populations will sing different songs. For instance, whales in the North Atlantic will sing a very different song from those in the Pacific. The songs may travel for hundreds or even thousands of miles through the water.

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Threats

Population levels of the Humpback Whale were drastically reduced by commercial whaling. They are now recovering, but Humpbacks are still subjected to a variety of potential threats, mostly related to human activities. Vessel strikes are the most significant threat to Humpback Whales. In B.C. waters, Humpback Whales are the most commonly reported whale species involved in incidents with vessels. These interactions can cause injuries ranging from scarring to direct mortality of individuals. Many shipping lanes cross migration and feeding areas, making the risk of collision more likely. Humpback Whales may also become entangled in fishing gear, and be negatively impacted by noise and chemical pollution. Additionally, reductions prey density and availability are also a potential threat to these whales.

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Protection

Federal Protection

More information about SARA, including how it protects individual species, is available in the Species at Risk Act: A Guide.

The Humpback Whale, North Pacific population, is listed under the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA). More information about SARA is available in the Species at Risk Act: A Guide. In 2003, North Pacific Humpback Whale population status was assessed as Threatened by COSEWIC, and in 2005 the population was listed as Threatened under SARA. The population was re-assessed as Special Concern in 2011 by COSEWIC and this assessment was confirmed in 2013. In response to this Special Concern assessment, Humpback Whale is now under consideration for listing as Special Concern under SARA. Within Canada, management of Humpback Whales falls under the responsibility of Fisheries and Oceans Canada. It is a violation under the Marine Mammal Regulations to disturb a marine mammal without proper authorization.

Provincial and Territorial Protection

To know if this species is protected by provincial or territorial laws, consult the provinces' and territories' websites.

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Other Protection or Status

Commercial harvesting of Humpback Whales has been banned by the International Whaling Commission in the North Pacific since 1965. Humpback Whales are also listed in Appendix 1 of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), which sets controls on the international trade and movement of species that have been, or may be, threatened due to commercial exploitation.

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Recovery Initiatives

Status of Recovery Planning

Recovery Strategies :

Name Recovery Strategy for the North Pacific Humpback Whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) in Canada
Status Final posting on SAR registry

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Recovery Progress and Activities

Once severely depleted in the north-eastern Pacific Ocean, Humpback Whales appear to be making a strong comeback. Sightings of this species are becoming common in many parts of the B.C. coast. Recovery initiatives include public education and stewardship by promoting responsible whale watching and developing a sighting and incident response network. DFO has undertaken field studies of Humpback Whales using identification of individuals from photographs of their tail flukes since 2000. Special effort was devoted to photo-ID in 2004 and 2005, as part of a North Pacific-wide international study of the abundance and distribution of Humpback Whales (known as ‘SPLASH’). An online catalogue of identification photos of approximately 1,500 Humpback Whales in B.C. has been made available by the Pacific Biological Station, DFO. The Department also collaborates with a variety of organizations to collect acoustic and visual data to clarify local abundances and distribution in B.C.’s north coast. Threats to the recovery of Humpback Whales in Pacific Canadian waters include mortality from vessel strikes, entanglement in fishing gear, and disturbance from vessel traffic and associated noise. A Marine Mammal Incident Response program has been developed by DFO to monitor and respond where possible to entanglements and vessel strikes. Efforts have been made by the B.C. Cetacean Sightings Network to promote awareness of such threats among mariners and residents of coastal communities and this extensive network of volunteer sighters will assist in incident response. URLs DFO: http://www-sci.pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/sa/cetacean/humpbackwhale/default_e.htm Vancouver Aquarium Marine Science Centre: Wild Whales: Humpback Whale: http://www.wildwhales.org/stewardship/index.html Parks Canada: http://www.pc.gc.ca/pn-np/bc/gwaiihaanas/ne/ne13_e.asp

Documents

PLEASE NOTE: Not all COSEWIC reports are currently available on the SARA Public Registry. Most of the reports not yet available are status reports for species assessed by COSEWIC prior to May 2002. Other COSEWIC reports not yet available may include those species assessed as Extinct, Data Deficient or Not at Risk. In the meantime, they are available on request from the COSEWIC Secretariat.

70 record(s) found.

COSEWIC Status Reports

  • COSEWIC Assessment and Status Report on the Humpback Whale Megaptera novaeangliae in Canada (2014-02-24)

    The Humpback Whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) is a baleen whale of the family Balaenopteridae. It reaches a length of 13-14 m. It is recognizable by its long pectoral flippers that are 25% of the body length, variable black and white colouration, and rich, complex songs. Its near-shore distribution and frequent acrobatic aerial displays make it a favourite species for whale watching in Canada and some other parts of the world. Also, the Humpback Whale has cultural significance to coastal First Nations in British Columbia, having been hunted for subsistence historically. Two distinct populations of Humpback Whales are recognized in Canada and have been assessed separately by COSEWIC: the Western North Atlantic population and the North Pacific population. This assessment concerns only the North Pacific population.

Response Statements

  • Response Statement - Humpback Whale, North Pacific population (2011-12-08)

    Although this recovering population is no longer considered to be Threatened, it is not yet secure. It was depleted by commercial whaling but has increased substantially since becoming legally protected from whaling in 1966. A basin-wide study in 2004-2006 resulted in an estimated abundance of 18,000 animals (not including first-year calves) in the North Pacific and an estimated rate of increase of 4.9 to 6.8%/year. Research conducted between 2004-06 indicated that about 2,145 whales (not including first-year calves) were present seasonally in British Columbia waters where they were increasing at around 4%/year. Current numbers are still considerably smaller than the minimum of 4,000 animals that must have been present off the west coast of Vancouver Island in 1905 given the numbers removed by whaling in the early 1900’s. This population in the eastern North Pacific continues to face several threats including noise disturbance, habitat degradation (especially on the breeding grounds), entanglement in fishing gear or debris, and ship strikes.   
  • Response Statements - Humpback Whale (2004-04-21)

    A response statement is a communications document that identifies how the Minister of the Environment intends to respond to the assessment of a wildlife species by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC). The document provides a start to the listing and recovery process for those species identified as being at risk, and provides timelines for action to the extent possible.

Recovery Strategies

  • Recovery Strategy for the North Pacific Humpback Whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) in Canada (2013-10-21)

    In 2003, North Pacific Humpback Whale population status was assessed as ‘threatened’ by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC), and in 2005 the population was listed as ‘threatened’ under Canada’s Species at Risk Act (SARA) affording it legal protection. The population’s status was re-assessed as ‘special concern’ in 2011 by COSEWIC. Following public consultation regarding the re-classification of the species, the Department of Fisheries and Oceans has referred the assessment of ‘special concern’ back to COSEWIC for further consideration and the SARA status of North Pacific Humpback remains unchanged at the publication of this document.

Action Plans

  • Multi-species Action Plan for Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve, National Marine Conservation Area Reserve, and Haida Heritage Site (2016-07-04)

    The Multi-species Action Plan for Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve, National Marine Conservation Area Reserve, and Haida Heritage Site meets the requirements for an action plan set out in the Species at Risk Act (SARA (s.47)) for species requiring an action plan that occur inside the boundary of the site. This action plan will be updated to more comprehensively include measures to conserve and recover the marine species at risk once the first integrated Land, Sea, People management plan for Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve, National Marine Conservation Area Reserve & Haida Heritage Site (hereafter called Gwaii Haanas) is complete. Measures described in this plan will also provide benefits for other species of conservation concern that regularly occur in Gwaii Haanas.
  • Multi-species Action Plan for Pacific Rim National Park Reserve of Canada (2017-08-24)

    Backed by the Insular Mountain Range of Vancouver Island and facing the open Pacific Ocean, Pacific Rim National Park Reserve of Canada (Pacific Rim NPR) protects and presents the rich natural and cultural heritage of Canada's west coast. Pacific Rim NPR consists of three distinct units, the Long Beach Unit, Broken Group Islands Unit, and West Coast Trail Unit, each offering a range of unique visitor experiences. With significant areas (51,216 ha in total) of old growth, temperate rainforest, coastal dune systems, wetlands and foreshore, and marine habitats, the park demonstrates the interconnectedness between land, sea, and people. These natural wonders are interwoven with the Nuu-chah-nulth First Nations culture (past and present), and that of European explorers and settlers.

Orders

  • Order Acknowledging Receipt of the Assessments Done Pursuant to Subsection 23(1) of the Act(volume 146, number 14, 2012) (2012-07-04)

    His Excellency the Governor General in Council, on the recommendation of the Minister of the Environment, acknowledges receipt, on the making of this Order, of the assessments done pursuant to subsection 23(1) of the Species at Risk Act by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) with respect to the species set out in the annexed schedule.
  • Order Acknowledging Receipt of the Assessments Done Pursuant to Subsection 23(1) of the Species at Risk Act (2004-04-21)

    This Order acknowledges receipt by the Governor in Council of the assessments of the status of wildlife species done pursuant to subsection 23(1) of the Species at Risk Act (SARA) by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC). The purpose of SARA is to prevent wildlife species from being extirpated or becoming extinct, to provide for the recovery of wildlife species that are extirpated, endangered or threatened as a result of human activity and to manage species of special concern to prevent them from becoming endangered or threatened.
  • Order Amending Schedule 1 to the Species at Risk Act (Vol. 151, No. 14) (2017-07-12)

    The Humpback Whale (North Pacific population) has increased in number significantly since it was first listed as a threatened species under Canada’s Species at Risk Act (SARA) in 2005. A 2011 assessment by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC), an independent scientific advisory body whose role under SARA is, among other things, to classify species as extinct, extirpated, endangered, threatened or species of special concern, has indicated that Humpback Whale (North Pacific population) growth rates have increased, leading to an increased abundance of the species. COSEWIC has determined that the Humpback Whale (North Pacific population) has reached a point where the species’ reclassification can be amended from a threatened species to a species of special concern. Given the reassessment by COSEWIC, and based on the considerations discussed below, the Governor in Council has put in place an Order that amends Schedule 1 of SARA. By this Order, the species is listed as a “species of special concern.”
  • Order Amending Schedule 1 to the Species at Risk Act (volume 147, number 7, 2013) (2013-03-27)

    This Order adds seven aquatic species to Schedule 1 of the Species at Risk Act (SARA) and reclassifies two species on Schedule 1 of SARA (Schedule 1). This Order also amends Schedule 1 by striking out one species previously listed as a single designatable unit and adding two new designatable units of the same species in its place. One designatable unit of a terrestrial species, currently also listed as part of a broader designatable unit, is struck out to eliminate duplication. These amendments are being made on the recommendation of the Minister of the Environment with advice from the other competent minister, the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans. A related Order under section 76 of SARA will exempt activities authorized under the Fisheries Act from the prohibitions of SARA for a period of one year for one of the species being added to Schedule 1 (Westslope Cutthroat Trout).
  • Order Amending Schedules 1 to 3 to the Species at Risk Act (volume 139, number 2, 2005) (2005-01-12)

    Schedule 1, the List of Wildlife Species at Risk of the Species at Risk Act (SARA), is amended by Order of the Governor in Council (GIC), on the recommendation of the Minister of the Environment, by the addition of 73 species. This Order is based on scientific assessments by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) and follows consultations with provincial and territorial governments, Aboriginal peoples, stakeholders and the public, and analysis of costs and benefits to Canadians.
  • Order Extending the Time for the Assessment of the Status of Wildlife Species (2006-06-14)

    The time provided for the assessment of the status of the wildlife species set out in the schedule is extended for 3 years from the day on which section 14 of the Species at Risk Act comes into force.

COSEWIC Annual Reports

  • COSEWIC Annual Report - 2010 - 2011 (2011-09-09)

    Under Canada’s Species at Risk Act (SARA), the foremost function of COSEWIC is to “assess the status of each wildlife species considered by COSEWIC to be at risk and, as part of the assessment, identify existing and potential threats to the species”. COSEWIC held two Wildlife Species Assessment Meetings during the past year assessing the status or reviewing the classification of a total of 92 wildlife species.

Permits and Related Agreements

  • Explanation for issuing licence(#14-PPAC-00029 ), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2014-06-19)

    The objective of this research is to estimate the abundance of the travel patterns, forage species and habitat use by cetaceans in and around Caamano Sound to Douglas Channel. Additionally, abundance data can support the possible identification of habitat that is critical to survival and recovery of the species. A previously established hydrophone network will be used to record whale calls and evaluate presence and activity. This work will also contribute to public education and awareness of the whales that inhabit the territory.
  • Explanation for issuing licence(#14-PPAC-00031 ), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2014-06-19)

    This study will use photo, video and acoustic identification of individuals, wounds, incidents and behaviour to document seasonal prey preference, feeding techniques, abundance and distribution, and rates and responses to anthropogenic threats. Prey and fecal samples will be collected for health and diet assessment, and mobile and fixed hydrophones will collect acoustic samples.
  • Explanation for issuing licence(#16-PPAC-00005 ), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2016-02-11)

    Authorized representatives from DFO, the Animal Health Center and the Vancouver Aquarium are licensed to collect for diagnostic purposes: all tissues, organ fluids and/or blood of dead salvaged parts or surplus material collected from dead marine mammals and turtles.
  • Explanation for issuing licence(#16-PPAC-00020 ), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2016-07-28)

    The exhaled breath of whales has a host of constituents that indicate health and status. These constituents include DNA, bacteria and hormones, and can provide comprehensive information about an individual such as: a whale's sex; its genetic relationship to its companions; whether it is fighting an infection, and the responsible pathogens; the community of microorganisms in its lungs; its exposure to certain pollutants; its stress levels; and whether it is pregnant. This research will use a small hexacopter to collect breath samples to assess the overall health of humpback whales in the Salish Sea. The remotely controlled hexacopter is permitted within 3 metres of a whale for breath sample collection. A maximum of 15 breath samples per year may be collected for the duration of this licence.
  • Explanation for issuing licence(#20-PPAC-00017 ), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2020-06-01)

    A comparison of the relative impacts of nutrition and toxicant exposure on reproduction of the Southern Resident killer whales, Bigg's Transient killer whales and baleen whales using non-invasive measures of analyzing hormone metabolites and toxicants from fecal sample collection.
  • Explanation for issuing licence(#20-PPAC-00018 ), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2020-07-01)

    Southern Resident Killer Whales face a variety of threats in the Salish Sea including reduced prey availability, and increased noise levels and vessel traffic. This study is an investigation of disturbance risk factors on Southern Resident Killer Whales through evaluation of sub-surface behaviour and activity using suction cup tags. Relative daily foraging rates and received noise levels will be quantified and compared to data collected from Northern Resident Killer Whales. Additional health and diet data of killer whales and humpback whales will be collected and analyzed through predation event and fecal sample collection.
  • Explanation for issuing licence(#20-PPAC-00019 ), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2020-05-01)

    Parks Canada is a dedicated partner in the Government of Canada's efforts to support the recovery of Southern Resident Killer Whales and health of all marine mammals. Parks Canada will perform surveys and monitor activity within, and adjacent to, the marine waters of the Pacific Rim National Park Reserve in an effort to contribute to overall understanding of presence, population size, and use of critical habitat by Southern Resident Killer Whales and other marine mammals.
  • Explanation for issuing licence(#20-PPAC-00020 ), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2020-05-01)

    Parks Canada is a dedicated partner in the Government of Canada's efforts to support the recovery of Southern Resident Killer Whales and health of all marine mammals. Parks Canada will perform surveys and monitor activity within, and adjacent to, the marine waters of the Gulf Islands National Park Reserve in an effort to contribute to overall understanding of presence, population size, and use of critical habitat by Southern Resident Killer Whales and other marine mammals. Closest approach distance for photo identification is 200m for killer whales and 40m for other cetaceans. Acoustic samplings using a portable hydrophone is permitted to a minimum of 200m to killer whales or 100m of other cetaceans. Vessel approach must maintain a 3-4 knot speed and stay behind or to the side of any individual or group of whales. Vessel engines and depth sounders must be off while collecting acoustic samples. Engagement time is limited to 30 minutes per whale, per day.
  • Explanation for issuing licence(#DFO-PAF SARA 100 ), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2009-06-01)

    The Licensee is authorized to conduct aerial and boat-based surveys of marine mammals. This research is part of the wildlife baseline studies to help inform the consequences of a potential development of a small port near Kitsault.
  • Explanation for issuing licence(#DFO-PAF SARA 104 ), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2009-07-14)

    The Licensee is authorized to collect fecal samples from killer whales for assessment of stress hormone levels in response to increased anthropogenic threats. These efforts are undertaken in collaboration with the University of Washington and their research into a larger fecal thyroid hormone assessment of Southern Resident Killer Whales. The secondary objective is to collect photographs of marine mammals on an opportunistic basis in Inside Passage waters. This study will continue ongoing photo identification efforts in collaboration with DFO researchers and others in the Pacific region.
  • Explanation for issuing licence(#DFO-PAF SARA 106), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2010-01-01)

    Authorized representatives from DFO, the Animal Health Center and the Vancouver Aquarium are licensed to collect for diagnostic purposes: all tissues, organ fluids and/or blood of dead salvaged parts or surplus material collected from dead marine mammals and turtles.
  • Explanation for issuing licence(#DFO-PAF SARA 107), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2010-02-09)

    Authorized representatives from DFO, the Animal Health Center and the Vancouver Aquarium are licensed to collect for diagnostic purposes: all tissues, organ fluids and/or blood of dead salvaged parts or surplus material collected from dead marine mammals and turtles.
  • Explanation for issuing licence(#DFO-PAF SARA 111 ), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2010-06-15)

    The Licensee is authorized to collect fecal samples from killer whales for assessment of stress hormone levels in response to increased anthropogenic threats. These efforts are undertaken in collaboration with the University of Washington and their research into a larger fecal thyroid hormone assessment of Southern Resident Killer Whales.
  • Explanation for issuing licence(#DFO-PAF SARA 150 ), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2010-05-01)

    This research continues the collection of long-term photo identification data of grey whales and humpback whales to investigate social organization with genetic analysis to determine sex and relatedness, and to monitor abundance and behaviour, respectively. The research includes additional objectives to compare genetics of current populations with that of ancient populations through collection of biopsy samples and bones found in the region.
  • Explanation for issuing licence(#DFO-PAF SARA 151 ), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2010-01-01)

    Authorized representatives from DFO and the Vancouver Aquarium are licensed to disentangle pinnipeds, cetaceans or sea turtles from fishing gear and other debris of human origin.
  • Explanation for issuing licence(#DFO-PAF SARA 151 ), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2011-01-01)

    The purpose of the study is to determine rates of entanglement for humpback whales. The abundance, structure, habitat and preferred prey will be assessed for humpback whales and minke whales. Authorized activities are photo documentation and prey, fecal, and acoustic sample collection.
  • Explanation for issuing licence(#DFO-PAF SARA 152 ), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2011-05-30)

    The objective of this research is to estimate the abundance of the travel patterns, forage species and habitat use by cetaceans in and around Caamano Sound to Douglas Channel. Additionally, abundance data can support the possible identification of habitat that is critical to survival and recovery of the species. This work will also contribute to public education and awareness of the whales that inhabit the territory.
  • >> See more Permits and Related Agreements documents

Consultation Documents

  • Species at Risk Act - Legal Listing of Aquatic Species, Pacific Region - Consultation Workbook (2004-03-17)

    Your opinion is being sought to assist the government of Canada in making an informed decision on whether to add any or all of the following 10 aquatic species to the Schedule 1 (the List of Wildlife Species at Risk) of the Species at Risk Act (SARA). The species include: Blue Whale, Sei Whale, Humpback Whale, Enos Lake Stickleback, Speckled Dace, Salish Sucker, Cultus Lake Sockeye, Interior Fraser Coho, Sakinaw Lake Sockeye, and Bocaccio. Your input on the impacts of adding these species to the List is important. This workbook has been developed to give you an opportunity to provide Fisheries and Oceans Canada with your feedback, advice, and other comments regarding adding the above mentioned 10 species to Schedule 1 of SARA (Schedule 1 identifies which species are legally protected under SARA).
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