Species Profile

Northern Madtom

Scientific Name: Noturus stigmosus
Taxonomy Group: Fishes
COSEWIC Range: Ontario
COSEWIC Assessment Date and Status Change: May 2012
COSEWIC Status: Endangered
COSEWIC Status Criteria: B1ab(iii)+2ab(iii)
COSEWIC Reason for Designation: This species is one of the rarest freshwater fish in Ontario, being found at only four locations in river systems in southwestern Ontario. Substantial and ongoing threats in these rivers include siltation, turbidity, exotic species and toxic compounds, which have all been assessed as high levels of concern. Although there may be some localized improvement in habitat, overall there is an inferred continuing decline in habitat quality and substantial ongoing threats throughout its range.
COSEWIC History of Status Designation: Species considered in April 1993 and placed in the Data Deficient category. Re-examined in April 1998 and designated Special Concern. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in November 2002 and May 2012.
SARA Status: Schedule 1, Endangered
Date of Listing (yyyy-mm-dd): 2005-01-12

Please note that this information is provided for general information purposes only. For the most up to date and accurate list of species listed under the Species at Risk Act, please see the Justice Laws Website.

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Image of Northern Madtom

Northern Madtom Photo 1

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Description

The Northern Madtom belongs to the bullhead catfish family. Members of the genus Noturus all have an adipose fin that is a long, low, ridge-like extension of the tail fin. In the Northern Madtom, the adipose fin appears completely separated from the tail fin by a deep notch. It is a bottom-dwelling fish with a thick body, and grows to a maximum length of 132 mm. It is mottled grey to tan and has three irregular dark saddles on its back.

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Distribution and Population

The Northern Madtom is found in the central United States south of the Great Lakes, and reaches the northern extent of its range in southern Ontario. In Canada, it is known only from Lake St. Clair and the Detroit, Sydenham, and Thames rivers. Observations from the 1990s indicate that sustainable reproducing populations are established in these water bodies, but no population estimates or trends are available.

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Habitat

The Northern Madtom prefers habitats ranging from large creeks to big rivers, with clear to turbid water, and moderate to swift current. The fish occurs on bottoms of sand, gravel, and stones, occasionally with silt, detritus, and accumulated debris. It is sometimes associated with large aquatic plants, and is typically collected at depths of less than 7 m.

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Biology

Nests are made under large rocks and in anthropogenic (human-produced) debris. Males guard both the eggs and newly hatched fry. Adult fish feed on insects, especially mayflies and caddisflies, and also eat crustaceans and smaller fishes. Spawning and feeding probably occur at night. In Lake St. Clair, pregnant females and recently spawned eggs were observed at the end of July. The nests were set in gentle currents on a sandy bottom surrounded by a thick bed of aquatic plants. Clutch size was estimated to range from 32 to 160 eggs.

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Threats

The absence of the species from the most strongly polluted sides of the St. Clair and Detroit rivers suggests that the Northern Madtom is sensitive to poor water quality. Competition from exotic fish species may also be having an impact.

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Protection

Federal Protection

The Northern Madtom is protected under the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA). More information about SARA, including how it protects individual species, is available in the Species at Risk Act: A Guide.

The Northern Madtom population in the Detroit River occurs in one of 43 "Areas of Concern." It will therefore benefit from full implementation of a Remedial Action Plan under a co-operative program between the United States and Canada.

Provincial and Territorial Protection

To know if this species is protected by provincial or territorial laws, consult the provinces' and territories' websites.

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Recovery Initiatives

Status of Recovery Planning

Recovery Strategies :

Name Recovery Strategy for the Northern Madtom (Noturus stigmosus) in Canada
Status Final posting on SAR registry

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Recovery Team

Essex-Erie Recovery Team

  • Shawn Staton - Chair/Contact - Fisheries and Oceans Canada
    Phone: 905-336-4864  Fax: 905-336-6437  Send Email

Ontario Freshwater Fish Recovery Team

  • Amy Boyko - Chair/Contact - Fisheries and Oceans Canada
    Phone: 905-336-6236  Fax: 905-336-6437  Send Email
  • Shawn Staton - Chair/Contact - Fisheries and Oceans Canada
    Phone: 905-336-4864  Fax: 905-336-6437  Send Email

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Documents

PLEASE NOTE: Not all COSEWIC reports are currently available on the SARA Public Registry. Most of the reports not yet available are status reports for species assessed by COSEWIC prior to May 2002. Other COSEWIC reports not yet available may include those species assessed as Extinct, Data Deficient or Not at Risk. In the meantime, they are available on request from the COSEWIC Secretariat.

147 record(s) found.

Reports on the Progress of Recovery Document Implementation

COSEWIC Status Reports

Response Statements

  • Response Statement - Northern Madtom (2013-01-03)

    This species is one of the rarest freshwater fish in Ontario, being found at only four locations in river systems in southwestern Ontario. Substantial and ongoing threats in these rivers include siltation, turbidity, exotic species and toxic compounds, which have all been assessed as high levels of concern. Although there may be some localized improvement in habitat, overall there is an inferred continuing decline in habitat quality and substantial ongoing threats throughout its range.
  • Response Statements - Northern Madtom (2004-04-21)

    A response statement is a communications document that identifies how the Minister of the Environment intends to respond to the assessment of a wildlife species by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC). The document provides a start to the listing and recovery process for those species identified as being at risk, and provides timelines for action to the extent possible.

Recovery Strategies

  • Recovery Strategy for the Northern Madtom (Noturus stigmosus) in Canada (2012-06-12)

    The Northern Madtom is a small (132 mm, maximum total length) freshwater catfish recognized by an overall mottled colour pattern with three distinct saddle-shaped markings on the back, located at the front of the dorsal fin, behind the dorsal fin and at the adipose fin. Evidence suggests that the Northern Madtom tolerates a wide range of habitat conditions and can be found in small creeks to large rivers, with clear to turbid water and moderate to swift current over substrates consisting of sand, gravel and rocks, occasionally with silt, detritus and accumulated debris.  It is also occasionally associated with macrophytes such as stonewort.  The Northern Madtom is native to North America and has a disjunct distribution throughout parts of the Mississippi and western Lake Erie and Lake St. Clair drainages.  This species is considered to be rare to extremely rare throughout its range and has a global status rank of G3 (vulnerable); a national status rank of N3 (vulnerable) in the United States; and, a Canadian national status of N1N2 (critically imperilled/imperilled).  There are two, possibly three, extant, reproducing populations in Canada: 1. lower Lake St. Clair – Detroit River; 2. Thames River of southwestern Ontario; and, 3. potentially the St. Clair River (a juvenile was caught in 2003, suggesting that reproduction may be occurring). A single specimen was collected from the Sydenham River in 1975; however, this remains the only record of Northern Madtom for this location. The recovery strategy for the Northern madtom is now posted for public consultation. The document identifies recovery objectives, critical habitat and mechanisms for critical habitat protection including a SARA order prohibiting the destruction of the critical habitat. The Minister of Fisheries and Oceans invites interested Canadians to submit comments.

Action Plans

  • Action Plan for the Sydenham River in Canada: An Ecosystem Approach (2018-05-24)

    The Sydenham River in southwestern Ontario supports an amazing diversity of aquatic life. Located in the lower Great Lakes basin, the river contains the greatest diversity of freshwater mussel species of any watershed in Canada. At least 34 species of mussels and 80 species of fishes have been found here. Many of these species are rare and seventeen species, including eleven mussels and six fishes, have been assessed by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) as Endangered, Threatened or Special Concern. The majority of these species are protected under the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA) and seven freshwater mussels (Round Hickorynut, Kidneyshell, Northern Riffleshell, Snuffbox, Round Pigtoe, Rayed Bean and Salamander Mussel) and two fishes (Eastern Sand Darter – Ontario population and Northern Madtom) are the focus of this action plan. The needs of these at risk fishes and mussels within the Sydenham River watershed will be addressed using a multi-species, ecosystem-based approach. The present plan is guided by four SARA recovery strategies for these nine species and builds on the ecosystem-based Sydenham River Recovery Strategy completed in 2003.

Orders

  • Order Acknowledging Receipt of the Assessments Done Pursuant to Subsection 23(1) of the Species at Risk Act (2004-04-21)

    This Order acknowledges receipt by the Governor in Council of the assessments of the status of wildlife species done pursuant to subsection 23(1) of the Species at Risk Act (SARA) by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC). The purpose of SARA is to prevent wildlife species from being extirpated or becoming extinct, to provide for the recovery of wildlife species that are extirpated, endangered or threatened as a result of human activity and to manage species of special concern to prevent them from becoming endangered or threatened.
  • Order Amending Schedules 1 to 3 to the Species at Risk Act (volume 139, number 2, 2005) (2005-01-12)

    Schedule 1, the List of Wildlife Species at Risk of the Species at Risk Act (SARA), is amended by Order of the Governor in Council (GIC), on the recommendation of the Minister of the Environment, by the addition of 73 species. This Order is based on scientific assessments by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) and follows consultations with provincial and territorial governments, Aboriginal peoples, stakeholders and the public, and analysis of costs and benefits to Canadians.

COSEWIC Annual Reports

  • COSEWIC Annual Report - 2003 (2003-10-01)

    May 2003 Annual Report to the Canadian Endangered Species Conservation Council by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada.
  • COSEWIC Annual Report - 2011-2012 (2012-10-05)

    Under Canada’s Species at Risk Act (SARA), the foremost function of COSEWIC is to “assess the status of each wildlife species considered by COSEWIC to be at risk and, as part of the assessment, identify existing and potential threats to the species”. COSEWIC held two Wildlife Species Assessment Meetings in this reporting year (September 1, 2011 to September 30, 2012) from November 21 to 25, 2011 and from April 29 to May 4, 2012. On February 3, 2012, an Emergency Assessment Subcommittee of COSEWIC also assessed the status of the Tri-colored Bat (Perimyotis subflavus), the Little Brown Myotis (Myotis lucifugus), and the Northern Myotis (Myotis septentrionalis). During the current reporting period COSEWIC assessed the status or reviewed the classification of 67 wildlife species. For species already found on Schedule 1 of SARA, the classification of 32 species was reviewed by COSEWIC and the status of the wildlife species was confirmed to be in the same category (extirpated - no longer found in the wild in Canada but occurring elsewhere, endangered, threatened or of special concern). The wildlife species assessment results for the 2011-2012 reporting period include the following: Extinct: 1 Extirpated: 4 Endangered: 29 Threatened: 10 Special Concern: 15 Data Deficient: 2 Not at Risk: 6 Total: 67 Of the 67 wildlife species examined, COSEWIC reviewed the classification of 49 species that had been previously assessed. The review of classification for 26 of those species resulted in a confirmation of the same status as the previous assessment (see Table 1a).

Permits and Related Agreements

  • Explanation for issuing other simliar documents(#20-HCAA-01466 ), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2021-02-22)

    This activity concerns the construction of a new ferry terminal within the Detroit River parallel to shore, nearest to Amherstburg, Ontario. The new ferry terminal will consist of a pier and loading dock supported by metal piles. The works will require the removal of existing dock structures on the Detroit River, dredging of (390 m2) of substrate within the footprint of the new dock and along the southern shore wall, the installation of an offshore steel sheet pile pier and subsequent infill (772 m2). The works will also include the installation of a separate steel sheet wall along the proponents entire property (145 meter), and the infilling (1,420 m2) of the embayment containing the former ferry dock. A fish rescue will be required for the pier construction and the infilling of the embayment. Captured fishes will be kept in temporary holding containers, monitored and released alive in suitable habitat upstream of the work area as soon as possible. The construction of the new pier and subsequent works is required because the existing ferry dock is at risk of catastrophic failure before the replacement facility can be completed and commissioned. Such a failure and disruption of ferry service will result in no access to or from the island for residents or for emergency vehicles. The activities associated with the proposed project described above that are likely to result in prohibited impacts to aquatic species at risk, critical habitat, and/or the residences of individuals, are incidental harm, harassment, or potential death of Channel Darter (Percina copelandi) (Lake Erie populations), Pugnose Minnow (Opsopoeodus emiliae), and Northern Madtom (Noturus stigmosus) resulting from the fish rescue and relocation program for the pier construction and embayment infill.
  • Explanation for issuing other simliar documents(#DFO-15-HCAA-00563), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2016-01-25)

    The permanent shoreline infilling of approximately 7,356 square metres of fish habitat in the Detroit River to an elevation of 175.58 metres to create a mooring structure that will facilitate offloading of lake freighters.
  • Explanation for issuing other simliar documents(#DFO-18-HCAA-00117 ), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2018-03-19)

    This project is to complete the remainder of an infill that was previously authorized (16-HCAA-01204, issued Oct. 25, 2016). Specifically, the permanent infilling of approximately 691 m2 of fish habitat in the Detroit River to an elevation of approximately 1.5 metres above Low Water Datum (LWD) or 175.58 metres (International Great Lakes Datum 1985), to create a mooring structure that will facilitate offloading of lake freighters. The proposed infill will occur from a water depth of zero to a maximum depth of 1.5 metres at LWD. An excavator and a bulldozer will be used to pick up and push the fill material, composed of clean, uncontaminated concrete or rock material, into the water. Offsetting measures will be undertaken at the location of the project site on the Detroit River as follows: a rocky revetment will be constructed, minimum of 1610 m2 in size; a spawning shoal will be constructed, a minimum of 3624 m2 in size; and shallow water habitat is to be created, a minimum of 1872 m2 in size. An offsite, offshore gravel spawning shoal, a minimum of 3000 m2 in size will be constructed, and a new riparian zone will be planted, a minimum of 210 m2 in size, to a total area of 10316 m2 of offsetting. The above listed activities may result in the incidental death of Channel Darter and Northern Madtom, listed aquatic species at risk.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(# DFO-15-PCAA-00008), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2015-04-10)

    This is an annual young-of-year (YOY) index survey on Lake St. Clair that has been carried out intermittently since 1979. This program is used to assess YOY abundance and diversity of key economically and ecologically important species in addition to the nearshore fish community composition and abundance. Fixed sites on the lake allow changes in community structure to be tracked, relative abundance and presence of aquatic invasive fish through time.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(# DFO-15-PCAA-00024), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2015-07-01)

    The objective is to sample Round Goby for both behavioural and genomic assays. The source site will be St. Claire River near Sarnia, where the Round Goby was initially found and assumed to be the first longest established site. The established sites will be the river mouths and the invasion fronts will be determined by methods from Bronnenhuber et al. (2011).
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#17-PCAA-00001), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2017-03-10)

    The St. Clair Region Conservation Authority (SCRCA) is sampling fish and mussels in several locations for presence/absence data. Currently, fish and mussel data is lacking in these areas. Baseline data will be collected to assist in future project proposals and inquiries. Benthic sampling will be undertaken for watershed characterization to allow the SCRCA to assess water quality throughout the watershed. Data obtained will assist the SCRCA in the identification of potential rehabilitation sites and impact monitoring.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#17-PCAA-00003), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2017-03-10)

    Objectives are to determine the distribution and habitat preferences of both native and non-native benthic fish species from southern Lake Huron through western Lake Erie (including St. Clair River, Lake St. Clair, and Detroit River). Focus will be on the fish response to habitat enhancement projects constructed in the Detroit River (Fighting Island Reef and Grassy Island Reef) and St. Clair Rivers (Hart's Light Reef and Algonac Reef) and two naturally occurring reefs, (one located near Peche Island in the headwaters of the Detroit River and one at the Blue Water Bridge in the headwaters of the St. Clair River). Also, fish communities will be monitored with multiple gear types for the purpose of detecting non-native fish species that have not yet become established within the Great Lakes. These surveys will occur in the St. Clair-Detroit River system along with the St. Marys River and northern Lake Huron.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#17-PCAA-00004), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2017-03-29)

    The objective of the project is to apply selective lampricide to assess and control Sea Lamprey populations in the Great Lakes. Assessment surveys are routinely conducted in tributaries and lentic areas to determine the presence, distribution, and abundance of Sea Lamprey larvae. In deep water (>0.8 m) areas, surveys are conducted with the application of granular Bayluscide, a bottom-release formulation of lampricide, within the demarcated boundaries of the plots with a standard area of 500 m2. Tributaries harbouring larval Sea Lamprey are treated periodically with lampricides to eliminate or reduce larval populations before they recruit to the lake as feeding juveniles. The treatment units administer and analyze TFM, or TFM/Niclosamide mixtures (TFM augmented with Bayluscide 70% wettable powder or 20% emulsifiable concentrate) during stream treatments, and apply 3.2% granular Bayluscide (gB) to control populations inhabiting lentic areas.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#17-PCAA-00005), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2017-04-06)

    The purpose of the activity is early detection surveillance sampling for Asian carps. Sampling is planned for near shore and tributaries throughout the Canadian waters of the Great Lakes basin. A total of 36 early detection sites have been selected in the Great Lakes basin. Combinations of sampling gears are deployed at each site in order in target all life-stages of Asian carps. A community assessment of the fishes present in the areas is collected. Field sampling techniques include a combination of passive and active fish sampling gears. A combination of gear types has proven to be the most effective method for detecting the majority of fishes in a specific habitat type.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#17-PCAA-00006), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2017-04-07)

    This is an annual young-of-year (YOY) index survey of Lake St. Clair that has been carried out intermittently since 1979. This program is used to assess YOY abundance and diversity of key economically and ecologically important species in addition to the nearshore fish community composition and abundance. Fixed sites on the lake allow changes in the community structure relative abundances and presences of aquatic invasive species and species at risk to be tracked through time. Collection is carried out using a 30' long 1/8" mesh beach scene in 2m of water or less during daylight hours. Seine hauls are carried out perpendicular to the shore and are approximately 30m in length. Captured fishes are identified, enumerated and released on site.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#17-PCAA-00008), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2017-04-07)

    The Biodiversity Science Section of the Great Lakes Laboratory for Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences will be conducting a survey of larval fishes in the East Sydenham River. This survey will occur at four locations between Alvinston and Dawn Mills, Ontario. This survey will involve placing stationary, larval drift nets into the Sydenham River for timed surveys each day for a period of three months (~12 weeks).
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#18-HCAA-01670 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-07-15)

    The activities authorized by this permit that may cause incidental harm to Northern Madtom (Noturus stigmosus) are the removal of existing armour stones from a property located along the Detroit River shoreline, and the installation of a new steel sheet pile wall and sheet pile cells for a new dock. Due to the behaviour of Northern Madtom hiding near rocks and other crevices, the areas near the property will be isolated using exclusion nets, and baited minnow traps will be set for at least 48 hours before being infilled to ensure no fish deaths occur. The activities authorized by this permit that may cause incidental harm to Northern Madtom, a contravention of section 32(1) of the Species at Risk Act, are the trapping of Northern Madtom using baited minnow traps and fish relocation operations during site isolation using a fish exclusion net.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-­PCAA-­00021), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-05-17)

    The objectives of the activities covered by the permit are to conduct research to investigate specific temperature thresholds for Eastern Sand Darter (Ammocrypta pellucida) in the Grand and Thames rivers through CT Max trials. Northern Madtom (Noturus stigmosus) may be captured incidentally during work in the Thames River. The activities authorized by the permit consist of the capture of Eastern Sand Darter from the Grand and Thames rivers using a seine net, and the handling of Eastern Sand Darter for the purposes of running CT Max trials. The CT Max trials will utilize a CORIO CD Heating Immersion Circulator. These devices are used to slowly, and precisely, raise the water temperature in large (20 to 100 L) flow­through troughs. These units will be acclimatized to ambient stream temperature before trials begin. Eastern Sand Darter will be placed into the CT Max flow­through troughs located streamside. Once in the trough, the trials will consist of slowly raising the temperature at the international standard of 0.3°C/minute. DFO staff will monitor the fish for two physical responses to thermal stress: 1) Agitation, signifying the temperature threshold at which the fish begin to move rapidly around the holding tank in the search for cooler water, 2) Loss of equilibrium, signifying the temperature at which the fish begin to lose equilibrium (balance) for a period of no more than 10 seconds. Once both physical cues have been documented, the CT Max experiment will cease, and temperatures will be cooled at a rate of 0.3°C/min until the temperature of the stream (or within 5°C) has been reached. At this point, the fish will be removed and placed into a recovery bin of fresh stream water and monitored for a minimum of 30 minutes. After the 30 minute window and once fish have regained equilibrium, they will be placed back into the stream. These activities may result in the incidental capture and handling of Northern Madtom from the Thames River for the purposes of identification and processing (count, measure, photograph etc.), while conducting surveys for Eastern Sand Darter. Any Northern Madtom incidentally captured will be returned alive to the location of capture.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-PCAA-00002 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-02-08)

    The objective of the activities covered by this permit are to determine the presence, distribution, and abundance of Sea Lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) larvae in the St. Clair River, Moira River, and Salmon River, and to treat tributaries with lampricide to eliminate or reduce larval Sea Lamprey populations in Bronte Creek and Trent River (Mayhew Creek). These activities may require the handling of species at risk (SAR) for the purposes of identification and processing (count, photograph, etc.). Any distressed fishes collected will be identified, counted, and released alive, with the exception of some smaller fishes that may be retained to confirm identification. The SAR listed on the permit may be incidentally captured or harmed during Sea Lamprey assessment and treatment activities.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-PCAA-00004 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-03-01)

    The objective of the activities covered by this permit are to determine the distribution and habitat preferences of native and non-native benthic fishes from southern Lake Huron through western Lake Erie (including the St. Clair River, Lake St. Clair, and Detroit River). Northern Madtom (Noturus stigmosus), Channel Darter (Percina copelandi), and Eastern Sand Darter (Ammocrypta pellucida) may be captured during these surveys. The activities will involve the capture of fishes using minnow traps, trawls, larval drift nets, fyke nets, boat electrofishing, and gill nets. The handling of fishes for the purposes of identification and processing (count, measures, photograph, etc.) will occur. Fishes collected will be identified, counted, and released alive, with the exception of some smaller fishes that may be retained to confirm identification. These activities may result in the incidental harm, harassment, or death of species at risk (SAR) resulting from capture, processing, and release.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-PCAA-00011), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-04-29)

    The objectives of the activities covered by this permit are to conduct fish and mussel surveys in the St. Clair River watershed and the Lake St. Clair watershed. Collected baseline data will be used to assist in future project proposals and inquiries. The activities authorized by this permit consist of the capture of any of the species listed on this permit from the St. Clair River watershed and the Lake St. Clair watershed, which will require the handling of any of the species listed on this permit for the purposes of identification and processing (count, photograph, etc.). Fishes will be released alive with the exception of some smaller fishes that may be retained to confirm identification. All mussels will be returned alive to the locations they were found. Sampling will be completed through the use of a backpack electrofishing unit, seine net, or minnow traps where necessary, using the Ontario Stream Assessment Protocol (OSAP). Mussel surveys will adhere to Mackie et al. (2008).
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-PCAA-00016), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-05-13)

    The objectives of the activities covered by the permit are to conduct a survey (seining and trawling) of the East Sydenham River to determine if Northern Madtom (Noturus stigmosus) still exists in this watershed. Previous recent surveys have been unsuccessful in detecting this species. The last known record of Northern Madtom in the East Sydenham River was from 1929 near Alvinston, Ontario, and from 1975 near Florence, Ontario. The other species listed on the permit may be captured incidentally during the surveys. The activities authorized by the permit consist of the capture of Northern Madtom from the East Sydenham River using a small mesh trawl and/or a small mesh seine net. The gear type used will depend on habitat conditions and water levels at each site. Identification and processing will involve the handling of Northern Madtom (count, measure, photograph etc.). After fishes are processed (identified, measured) they will be released back to the river, alive. Vouchers will be collected using digital cameras, but some vouchers of smaller fishes may be retained in 10% formalin to confirm identification, if digital vouchers cannot be collected. These survey activities may result in the incidental capture and handling of Eastern Sand Darter (Ammocrypta pellucida) and the species at risk mussels listed on the permit, for the purposes of identification and processing (count, measure, photograph etc.). Any species at risk incidentally captured will be returned alive to the location of capture.
  • >> See more Permits and Related Agreements documents

Consultation Documents

  • Consultation on Amending the List of Species Under the Species at Risk Act - Central & Arctic Region (2004-04-19)

    Your opinion is being sought to assist the government of Canada in making an informed decision on whether to add the Northern Madtom, Pugnose Shiner, Kidneyshell, Round Hickorynut, Lake Winnipeg Physa Snail, Channel Darter, Shortjaw Cisco, and Atlantic Cod (Arctic population) to the Schedule 1 (the List of Wildlife Species at Risk) of the Species at Risk Act (SARA). Your input on the impacts of adding these species to the List is important. This workbook has been developed to give you an opportunity to provide Fisheries and Oceans Canada with your feedback, advice, and other comments regarding adding these species to Schedule 1 of SARA (Schedule 1 identifies which species are legally protected under SARA).

Critical Habitat Orders

  • Critical Habitat of the Northern Madtom (Noturus stigmosus) Order (2016-05-18)

    Under SARA, the critical habitat of aquatic species must be legally protected within 180 days after the posting of the final recovery strategy on the SAR Public Registry. Critical habitat not mentioned in subsection 58(2) must be protected either by the application of the prohibition against the destruction of critical habitat in subsection 58(1), or by provisions in, or measures under, SARA or any other Act of Parliament, including agreements under section 11 of SARA. It is important to note that in order for another federal law to be used to legally protect critical habitat, it must provide an equivalent level of legal protection of critical habitat as would be afforded through subsection 58(1) of SARA, failing which, the Minister must make an order under subsections 58(4) and (5) of SARA. Therefore, this Order for the protection of critical habitat of the Northern Madtom is intended to satisfy the obligation to legally protect critical habitat by triggering the prohibition under SARA against the destruction of any part of the species’ critical habitat.

Recovery Document Posting Plans

  • Recovery Document Posting Plan - Fisheries and Oceans Canada - Fiscal Year 2016-2017 (2018-09-28)

    Under the Species at Risk Act (SARA), the competent Minister(s) must prepare a recovery strategy within one year of listing a species on Schedule 1 of SARA as endangered and within two years of listing a species as extirpated or threatened. A management plan must be prepared within three years for a species listed as special concern. Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) is accountable for 111 of the 518 species listed under SARA. As of February 2016, proposed recovery strategies, management plans and action plans for 57 of those species have not yet been posted to the Species at Risk Public Registry. An additional 23 aquatic species have proposed management or action plans coming due in the future. The following outlines the Department’s plan for posting proposed documents for 64 species on the Species at Risk Public Registry. The Department has a plan to post recovery strategies for 9 species, management plans for 13 species, and action plans for 42 species over the next year. Original publication of the Recovery Document Posting Plan: 2016-05-02
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