Species Profile

Sprague's Pipit

Scientific Name: Anthus spragueii
Taxonomy Group: Birds
COSEWIC Range: Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba
COSEWIC Assessment Date and Status Change: April 2010
COSEWIC Status: Threatened
COSEWIC Status Criteria: Does not meet any of the criteria, but designated Threatened because of a substantial decline in the population since the late 1960's and a projected loss and fragmentation of habitat likely to affect this area sensitive grassland specialist.
COSEWIC Reason for Designation: Approximately 80% of the global breeding population of this species occurs in Canada. It is a habitat specialist that needs large tracts of intact native grassland for breeding. Threats at both breeding and wintering grounds include ongoing habitat loss, degradation and fragmentation. The species has experienced long-term declines with no evidence of recovery.
COSEWIC History of Status Designation: Designated Threatened in April 1999. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000 and April 2010.
SARA Status: Schedule 1, Threatened
Date of Listing (yyyy-mm-dd): 2003-06-05

Please note that this information is provided for general information purposes only. For the most up to date and accurate list of species listed under the Species at Risk Act, please see the Justice Laws Website.

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Quick Links: | Photo | Description | Distribution and Population | Habitat | Biology | Threats | Protection | Recovery Initiatives | Recovery Team | National Recovery Program | Documents

Image of Sprague's Pipit

Sprague's Pipit Photo 1

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Description

The Sprague's Pipit is a small (15-17 cm, 23-25 g), ground-nesting songbird that is endemic to the Canadian Prairies and northern Great Plains of the United States. The bird resembles a sparrow, with rather nondescript brown plumage, and a thin bill. The sexes are similar in appearance. Sprague's Pipits are secretive birds that are rarely seen out in the open. Individuals are most often detected by their song, which is a series of seven or eight tinkling, descending notes that is delivered from high in the air.

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Distribution and Population

The species breeds from the foothills of the Rocky Mountains in southern and central Alberta, to west-central and southern Manitoba, and south to southern Montana, northern South Dakota and northwestern Minnesota. A single confirmed breeding record also occurred recently in south-central British Columbia. The breeding range appears to have contracted during this century, particularly in the northwestern (Alberta), northeastern (Manitoba), and southeastern (Minnesota) parts of the range. Sprague's Pipits winter in the southern United States and the northern two-thirds of Mexico. There are no historical estimates of population size for this species, but anecdotal accounts suggest that it was one of the most common grassland songbirds throughout much of its breeding range around the turn of the century. The species remains common in suitable habitat, particularly on the Canadian prairies. However, Breeding Bird Survey data collected over the past 30 years show that populations are declining rapidly in many parts of the range, particularly during the last 15 years. Populations in Alberta and Saskatchewan, where the highest densities of pipits currently occur, have declined by 9.4% and 5.4% per year, respectively, since 1996. Overall in Canada during this period, populations have been declining by 7.1% a year, with the sharpest decreases occurring in aspen parkland regions.

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Habitat

Native grassland is an important habitat for Sprague's Pipits. The species is rarely found in cultivated lands, or in areas where native grasses have been replaced with introduced forages. In general, the pipits prefer native vegetation of intermediate height and density, with moderate amounts of litter. Such areas tend to occur where habitats are lightly to moderately grazed, or where fires periodically remove vegetation. Areas of suitable habitat must be >150 ha to be attractive as breeding sites for this species. Habitats become unsuitable for breeding where livestock activity is intense, when native habitat is harvested as hay, when fires are supressed, or when native grasslands become fragmented by human activities. Current information suggests that at least 75% of native grasslands on the Canadian prairies has been lost to cultivation. This has greatly reduced the availability of suitable habitat for Sprague's Pipit.

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Biology

Sprague's Pipits arrive on the breeding grounds in late April or early May. Females lay 3 to 6 eggs (average 4.5) between late May and early July, and incubate for 10-12 days. The female is primarily responsible for tending to the chicks. Less than one in three nesting attempts is successful, with depredation of eggs or young being the most usual cause of failure. Productivity might also be reduced by Brown-headed Cowbirds (Molothrus ater), which have been known to parasitize (lay their eggs in) up to 25% of pipit nests. Some pipits may initiate a second nest after successful completion of the first. Sprague's Pipits are mostly insectivorous, consuming beetles and grasshoppers, along with lepidopteran larvae, arachnids and hymenopterans. Seeds comprise < 3% of the diet during the breeding season. By late September, most individuals have departed for the wintering grounds.

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Threats

Habitat loss is the primary cause of decline in this species. In particular, approximately 75% of native grasslands on the Canadian prairies have been lost to cultivation, which renders the habitat unsuitable for Sprague's Pipits. Among the other factors which may also reduce habitat suitability are: 1) intensive grazing, which removes vegetation and may cause reproductive failure due to disturbance and trampling of nests; 2) haying; 3) fragmentation of habitat; and 4) reduction in fire frequency, which encourages encroachment of woody vegetation and promotes excessive growth of vegetation and accumulation of litter. The use of pesticides to control grasshoppers may also impact Sprague's Pipit populations, since grasshoppers are an important food item for the adults and nestlings during the breeding season. The most significant 'natural' limiting factor for the species is probably drought, which affects nesting habitat and possibly food supply at the local level.

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Protection

Federal Protection

The Sprague's Pipit is protected under the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA). More information about SARA, including how it protects individual species, is available in the Species at Risk Act: A Guide.

The Sprague's Pipit is protected by the federal Migratory Birds Convention Act. Under this Act, it is prohibited to kill, harm, or collect adults, young, and eggs. This species is found in Grasslands National Park, where it is protected by the Canada National Parks Act. It is also found on military reserves in Alberta and Manitoba and in two National Wildlife Areas, which are federal lands protected under SARA. It is further protected by the British Columbia, Alberta, and Saskatchewan Wildlife Acts.

Provincial and Territorial Protection

To know if this species is protected by provincial or territorial laws, consult the provinces' and territories' websites.

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Recovery Initiatives

Status of Recovery Planning

Recovery Strategies :

Name Recovery Strategy for the Sprague’s Pipit (Anthus spragueii) in Canada
Status Final posting on SAR registry

Name Amendment to the final Recovery Strategy for the Sprague’s Pipit (Anthus spragueii) in Canada RE: Partial identification of critical habitat in Alberta and Saskatchewan and Action Planning
Status First posting on SAR registry

Name Amended Recovery Strategy for the Sprague’s Pipit (Anthus spragueii) in Canada
Status Final posting on SAR registry

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Recovery Team

Sprague's Pipit Recovery Team

  • Stephen K. Davis - Chair/Contact - Environment Canada
    Phone: 306-780-5342  Fax: 306-780-7614  Send Email

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Recovery Progress and Activities

Summary of Progress to Date Recovery for the Sprague’s Pipit is addressed under a national recovery strategy. Recovery goals and objectives for the species have been established, and threats, along with the recovery efforts required to mitigate these threats, have been identified. Summary of Research/Monitoring Activities Systematic surveys for Sprague’s Pipits have been conducted on federal lands along the northern portion of their range in Saskatchewan. This area was chosen because of the greater uncertainty associated with pipit numbers and distribution in this part of their range. Pipit populations continue to be monitored by staff at Suffield National Wildlife Area in southeast Alberta and via Grassland Bird Monitoring routes across the prairies. Demographic (e.g., survival and reproduction) monitoring was initiated at Last Mountain Lake National Wildlife Area in central Saskatchewan by staff in 2004 and has recently expanded to nearby Prairie Farm Rehabilitation Administration pastures (PFRA, part of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada). Recent research has found pipit abundance, density, and productivity to be greatest on large plots of native mixed-grass prairie. Current research is focusing on how landscape composition influences Sprague’s Pipit density on native and non-native grasslands in Saskatchewan and Alberta. Demographic information, such as pipit growth rates, nesting success, and juvenile and adult survival, is being gathered from studies on native and non-native grasslands. Research using stable isotope analyses is being conducted to identify Sprague’s Pipit wintering grounds, determine its moulting patterns, and assess levels of dispersal and recruitment in grassland- and cropland-dominated landscapes in central Saskatchewan. Research in Grasslands National Park is determining the effect of grazing on pipit abundance and reproductive success. Summary of Recovery Activities Stewardship activities promoting the maintenance and enhancement of native prairie habitat are underway throughout the pipit’s range in Prairie Canada. Conservation agencies receiving support through the Habitat Stewardship Program for Species at Risk are working closely with producers to improve awareness of pipit habitat requirements and conserve native prairie habitat through voluntary agreements, management agreements, and conservation easements. URLs Alberta’s Endangered Species Conservation Committee – Sprague’ Pipit:http://www.srd.gov.ab.ca/fw/escc/pipit.htmlEnvironment Canada:http://www.pnr-rpn.ec.gc.ca/nature/endspecies/sar/db08s19.en.html The Nature Conservancy: Sprague’s Pipit:http://www.nature.org/initiatives/programs/birds/explore/spraguespipit.html Alberta, Naturally: Sprague’s Pipit:http://www.abheritage.ca/abnature/speciesatrisk/pipit_intro.htm Stephen K. Davis: Sprague’s Pipit Recovery Team chair and adjunct professor – University of Reginahttp://users.accesscomm.ca/skdavis/home_page.htm

Documents

PLEASE NOTE: Not all COSEWIC reports are currently available on the SARA Public Registry. Most of the reports not yet available are status reports for species assessed by COSEWIC prior to May 2002. Other COSEWIC reports not yet available may include those species assessed as Extinct, Data Deficient or Not at Risk. In the meantime, they are available on request from the COSEWIC Secretariat.

32 record(s) found.

Reports on the Progress of Recovery Document Implementation

COSEWIC Status Reports

  • COSEWIC Assessment and Status Report on the Sprague’s Pipit Anthus spragueii in Canada (2010-09-03)

    Sprague’s Pipit is a medium-sized, cryptically coloured songbird with a thin bill and a distinctive tail pattern that has white outer feathers contrasting with brown inner feathers. No subspecies or genetic variants are recognized. The species is considered one of high conservation and stewardship priority for Canada because most of its distribution and core breeding range occurs in Prairie Canada.

COSEWIC Assessments

  • COSEWIC Assessment Summary and Status Report: Sprague’s Pipit Anthus spragueii (2010-09-03)

    Assessment Summary – April 2010 Common nameSprague’s Pipit Scientific nameAnthus spragueii StatusThreatened Reason for designationApproximately 80% of the global breeding population of this species occurs in Canada. It is a habitat specialist that needs large tracts of intact native grassland for breeding. Threats at both breeding and wintering grounds include ongoing habitat loss, degradation and fragmentation. The species has experienced long–term declines with no evidence of recovery. OccurrenceAlberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba Status historyDesignated Threatened in April 1999. Status re–examined and confirmed in May 2000 and April 2010.

Response Statements

  • Response Statement - Sprague's Pipit (2010-12-02)

    Approximately 80% of the global breeding population of this species occurs in Canada. It is a habitat specialist that needs large tracts of intact native grassland for breeding. Threats at both breeding and wintering grounds include ongoing habitat loss, degradation and fragmentation. The species has experienced long-term declines with no evidence of recovery.

Recovery Strategies

  • Recovery Strategy for the Sprague’s Pipit (Anthus spragueii) in Canada (2012-11-30)

    The Recovery Strategy for the Sprague’s Pipit (Anthus spragueii) in Canada (Environment Canada 2008) was posted on the Species at Risk Public Registry in May 2008. Under Section 45 of the Species at Risk Act (SARA), the Minister of the Environment may amend a recovery strategy at any time. This amendment to the Recovery Strategy for the Sprague’s Pipit (Anthus spragueii) in Canada is for the purpose of: Identifying Sprague's Pipit critical habitat. Research and analysis of information gathered regarding critical habitat for Sprague’s Pipit have advanced since the posting of the final Recovery Strategy for this species in 2008, allowing partial identification of critical habitat. Revising the Schedule of Studies to identify critical habitat as a number of studies are still required before critical habitat identification can be completed. Revising Environment Canada’s timelines of the action planning for the Sprague's Pipit.

Action Plans

  • Action Plan for Multiple Species at Risk in Southwestern Saskatchewan: South of the Divide (2017-11-20)

    The Minister of Environment is the competent minister under SARA for the recovery of the species on lands covered by this action plan and has prepared it to partially implement the associated recovery strategies, as per section 49 of SARA. To the extent possible, it has been prepared in cooperation with the Government of Saskatchewan (Ministry of the Environment, Ministry of Agriculture, Water Security Agency, Ministry of the Economy) and with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada and Parks Canada Agency.
  • Multi-species Action Plan for Grasslands National Park of Canada (2016-07-05)

    The Multi-species Action Plan for Grasslands National Park of Canada applies to lands and waters occurring within the boundaries of Grasslands National Park of Canada (GNP). The plan meets the requirements for action plans set out in the Species At Risk Act (SARA s.47) for species requiring an action plan and that regularly occur at this site. Measures described in this plan will also provide benefits for other species of conservation concern that regularly occur at GNP.

Critical Habitat Statements

  • Protection statement for the habitat to which the Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994 applies for migratory birds listed under the Species at Risk Act (2022-03-25)

    This statement describes how critical habitat identified for species that are both a migratory bird protected under the Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994 (MBCA) and listed as endangered, threatened, or extirpated  on Schedule 1 of the Species at Risk Act, S.C. 2002, c. 29 (SARA) are protected on non-federal land in Canada. This statement is made by the Minister of Environment pursuant to paragraph 58(5.2)(b) of SARA. Recovery documents and relevant critical habitat information can be accessed via the Related species links at the bottom of this page. Recovery documents Action Plan for the Piping Plover (Charadrius melodus circumcinctus) in Alberta Action Plan for the Piping Plover (Charadrius melodus circumcinctus) in Saskatchewan Recovery Strategy for the Eskimo Curlew (Numenius borealis) in Canada Recovery Strategy for the Henslow’s Sparrow (Ammodramus henslowii) in Canada Recovery Strategy for the Kirtland’s Warbler (Dendroica kirtlandii) in Canada Recovery Strategy for the Loggerhead Shrike, migrans subspecies (Lanius ludovicianus migrans), in Canada Recovery Strategy for the Mountain Plover (Charadrius montanus) in Canada Recovery Strategy for the Piping Plover (Charadrius melodus circumcinctus) in Canada Recovery Strategy for the Red Crossbill, percna subspecies (Loxia curvirostra percna), in Canada Recovery Strategy for the Roseate Tern (Sterna dougallii) in Canada Recovery Strategy for the Short-tailed Albatross (Phoebastria albatrus) and Pink-footed Shearwater (Puffinus creatopus) in Canada Recovery Strategy for the Whooping Crane (Grus americana) in Canada -->

COSEWIC Annual Reports

  • COSEWIC Annual Report - 2010 (2010-09-03)

    Under Canada’s Species At Risk Act (SARA), the foremost function of COSEWIC is to “assess the status of each wildlife species considered by COSEWIC to be at risk and, as part of the assessment, identify existing and potential threats to the species”. During the past year, COSEWIC held two Wildlife Species Assessment Meetings and reviewed the status of 79 wildlife species (species, subspecies, populations). During the meeting of November 2009, COSEWIC assessed or reviewed the classification of the status of 28 wildlife species. COSEWIC assessed or reviewed the classification of an additional 51 wildlife species (species, subspecies and populations) during their April 2010 meeting. For species already found on Schedule 1 of SARA, the classification of 32 species was reviewed by COSEWIC and the status of the wildlife species was confirmed to be in the same category (extirpated - no longer found in the wild in Canada but occurring elsewhere, endangered, threatened or of special concern). The wildlife species assessment results for the 2009-2010 reporting period include the following: Extirpated: 6 Endangered: 39 Threatened: 16 Special Concern: 17 Data Deficient: 1 This report transmits to the Minister the status of 46 species newly classified as extirpated, endangered, threatened or of special concern, fulfilling COSEWIC’s obligations under SARA Section 24 and 25. A full detailed summary of the assessment for each species and the reason for the designation can be found in Appendix I of the attached report. Since its inception, COSEWIC has assessed 602 wildlife species in various risk categories, including 262 Endangered, 151 Threatened, 166 Special Concern and 23 Extirpated. In addition, 13 wildlife species have been assessed as Extinct. Also, to date, 46 wildlife species have been identified by COSEWIC as Data Deficient and 166 wildlife species were assessed as Not at Risk. This year has been a particularly productive year for COSEWIC’s Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge (ATK) Subcommittee. In April 2010 COSEWIC approved the Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge Process and Protocol Guidelines, providing clear and agreed principles for the gathering of Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge to carry out COSEWIC functions as required under Section 15(2) of SARA (See Appendix III of the attached report). We are grateful for the rich and enthusiastic contribution made by community elders and experts in helping the ATK Subcommittee prepare the ATK protocols.

Permits and Related Agreements

  • Explanation for issuing permit(#10494 N & P), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2005-05-10)

    Capture and mark migratory birds. Justification for permits: 10494 N 10494 P
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#10761 G (EXT.1)), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2021-06-11)

    Capture and mark migratory birds
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#10761 G), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-04-20)

    Capture and mark migratory birds
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#10761 G), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2018-04-20)

    Capture and mark migratory birds
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#10761 N), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2018-04-20)

    Capture and mark migratory birds
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#10779 (ext.1)), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2008-03-04)

    Capture and mark migratory birds. Justification for permits: 10732
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#10779 (ext.2)), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2011-03-15)

    Capture and banding of birds.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#10779 (ext.3)), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2014-03-24)

    Capture and mark migratory birds
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#10779), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2020-04-16)

    Capture and mark migratory birds
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#10840), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2011-02-02)

    Capture and banding of birds.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#10840), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2014-02-02)

    Capture and mark migratory birds
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#9440-24/S6-2 CWS06-S002), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2006-05-01)

    The research will be conducted in the East Block of Grasslands National Park of Canada, Saskatchewan, and in three or four community pastures surrounding the park. All research will be conducted in native dry mixed-grass prairies. Some of the objectives of the research include: determining how grazing and environmental conditions interact to influence heterogeneity and nest success of avian communities, and determining whether effects of grazing on insects influences avian diversity and nesting success.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#GRA-2006-617), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2006-05-01)

    The objectives of this project are to determine the effects of habitat, management, and prey and predator abundance, on the density and breeding success of native prairie birds including Sprague's Pipits at the core of their range, in Grasslands National Park of Canada (GNPC). Cattle grazing will be experimentally manipulated using a range of grazing intensities, at large spatial scales. This study will restore a full range of disturbance regimes that grassland birds evolved with. Simultaneously, the response of the natural community will be quantified, and disturbance patterns that are best for these species will be determined. This research is being conducted in the East Block of Grasslands National Park of Canada (GNPC). The first two years of sampling will be used, firstly, to develop baseline before-grazing treatment estimates of Sprague's Pipit density, avian diversity, density of other passerines, and nest success; secondly, they will be used to compare these variables in ungrazed pastures (within GNPC), to grazed community pastures (outside GNPC). In 2008, yearling steers will be introduced to 6 of the pastures from May to September. The remaining 3 GNPC pastures will be ungrazed controls. Diversity and density of Sprague's Pipits and other birds, including avian predators, will be determined using 100m fixed-radius point-count plots. To monitor nest density and nesting success, two permanent, 300x300 m nest survey plots will be established in each pasture (Koper and Schmiegelow submitted manuscript). One will be adjacent to, and one far from, the riparian zone. Nests will be found within these plots by observing parents flush from nests (using systematic walking and rope-drags). A 10-cm piece of flagging tape will be placed 10m North and East of the nest to allow researchers to find the nest again 2-4 days later. Researchers will leave the nest 15 minutes after the initial search, and 1 minute after each revisit. Nesting success will be monitored via repeated visits every 2-4 days until fledging (Winter et al. 2003).
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#GRA-2008-1948), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2009-04-01)

    This permit was already submitted - June 19, 2009. Eastern Yellow-bellied Racer population survey and research occurring in southwestern Saskatchewan: This permit concerns the portion of the research that will take place in Grasslands National Park of Canada. It is not known how many snakes will be trapped but it could be up to 50 per year for the whole region. The snakes will receive a permanent mark in the form of a PIT tag. Blood will be drawn for genetic testing. Large-bodied racers will have radio-transmitters surgically implanted by a veterinarian. Data gathered from marking and genetic testing will be used to estimate population sizes and migration rates and radio-tracking data will be used to assess movement patterns, risks to survival and habitat features selected by the snakes.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#SSFU-2015-029-GNP), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2017-07-01)

    Parks Canada is constructing a scenic road with parking areas, viewpoints, connecting walking trails, day use areas and a 3.2 km neighbour/emergency access along the eastern edge of the East Block of Grasslands National Park (GNP). The project will provide basic access to key locations in GNP and meet commitments outlined in GNP's 2010 Park Management Plan to improve road access, develop interpretive viewing and day-use areas, and to increase infrastructure to enhance visitor experience in this area of the park. The road will be on the upland grasslands between the badlands to the west and privately-owned cultivated fields to the east. The 10.85 km low-profile, asphalt-topped, single lane road (no ditches, road top flush to ground, 3.5 m wide) is designed to accommodate two-way traffic at speeds of 20-30 km/h using a series of laybys for passing (pullover spots) every ~400 m. The road will replace an existing 13 km dirt vehicle trail, portions of which have been maintained as motorized vehicle access trails and other portions as hiking/wagon trails since park acquisition. Prior to park acquisition, past landowners used it for access of pasture lands and fire response for decades. In addition to enhancing visitor experience, the road will address informal vehicle trail use and unauthorized off-roading. Project activities will take place within critical habitat for the Greater Sage-Grouse and Sprague's Pipit and contravene s.58 of SARA.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#SSFU-2017-014-BMP), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2017-04-18)

    Parks Canada will be conducting prescribed fires throughout Grasslands National Park over the next 10 years for a variety of purposes including: enhance native seed production, restore ecological integrity by mimicking natural disturbances, facilitate shift of vegetation composition from non-native to native plant species, increase spatial and temporal heterogeneity, manipulate grazing patterns, and enhance wildlife habitat. They result in reduced wildfire risk by creating landscape level barriers that limit the potential for uncontrollable wildfire fire spread, and protect park staff and visitors, valuable infrastructure, facilities, and natural and cultural resources. These fires will contravene s.58 for the Sprague's Pipit. Sprague's Pipit critical habitat occurs throughout Grasslands National Park, and many of the potential prescribed fires for the next 10 years will occur in this critical habitat.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#SSFU-2018-003b), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2018-03-15)

    Parks Canada will be conducting prescribed fires in the Gergovia area of Grasslands National Park to: enhance native seed production, restore ecological integrity by mimicking natural disturbances, facilitate shift of vegetation composition from non-native to native plant species, increase spatial and temporal heterogeneity, manipulate grazing patterns, and enhance wildlife habitat. Prescribed fires also result in reduced wildfire risk by creating landscape level barriers that limit the potential for uncontrollable wildfire spread, and protect park staff and visitors, valuable infrastructure, facilities, and natural and cultural resources. The proposed Gergovia prescribed fires contravene section 58 of the Species at Risk Act by temporarily destroying critical habitat for Sprague's Pipits. Once burned, critical habitat may not be available to Sprague's Pipit in the year of the prescribed fire until regrowth occurs.
  • >> See more Permits and Related Agreements documents

Consultation Documents

  • Consultation on Amending the List of Species under the Species at Risk Act: Terrestrial Species – November 2010 (2010-12-02)

    As part of its strategy for protecting wildlife species at risk, the Government of Canada proclaimed the Species at Risk Act (SARA) on June 5, 2003. Attached to the Act is Schedule 1, the list of the species that receive protection under SARA, also called the List of Wildlife Species at Risk. Please submit your comments by February 4, 2011 for species undergoing normal consultations and by February 4, 2012 for species undergoing extended consultations.

Residence Description

  • Description of Residence for Sprague’s Pipit (Anthus spragueii) in Canada (2005-06-22)

    The following is a description of residence for the Sprague's Pipit (Anthus spragueii), created for the purposes of increasing public awareness and aiding enforcement of the above prohibition. As a migratory bird protected under the MBCA, the Sprague's pipit is under federal jurisdiction and thus the residence prohibition is in effect on all lands where the species occurs. They are known to have one type of residence - the nest.

Critical Habitat Descriptions in the Canada Gazette

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