Species Profile

Nooksack Dace

Scientific Name: Rhinichthys cataractae
Other/Previous Names: Rhinichthys sp. ,Rhinichthys cataractae ssp.
Taxonomy Group: Fishes
COSEWIC Range: British Columbia
COSEWIC Assessment Date and Status Change: November 2018
COSEWIC Status: Endangered
COSEWIC Status Criteria: B1ab(i,ii,iii,iv,v)+2ab(i,ii,iii,iv,v)
COSEWIC Reason for Designation: This small fish is a habitat specialist dependent on stream riffles with loose, rocky substrates. In Canada, it is found in disjunct habitat patches in the Fraser River Valley Lowlands where its distribution is severely limited. It is subject to ongoing habitat loss by destruction of riffle habitat from urban, industrial, and agricultural practices. Streams where the species is found are also impacted by lack of water in late summer due to ground and surface water extraction and climate change. Sediment accumulation in riffles, caused by bank erosion resulting from gravel mining and/or runoff from urban storm drains, has led to further degradation of water quality and habitat.
COSEWIC History of Status Designation: Designated Endangered in April 1996. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000, April 2007, and November 2018.
SARA Status: Schedule 1, Endangered
Date of Listing (yyyy-mm-dd): 2003-06-05

Please note that this information is provided for general information purposes only. For the most up to date and accurate list of species listed under the Species at Risk Act, please see the Justice Laws Website.

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Quick Links: | Photo | Description | Distribution and Population | Habitat | Biology | Threats | Protection | Recovery Initiatives | National Recovery Program | Documents

Image of Nooksack Dace

Nooksack Dace Photo 1
Nooksack Dace Photo 2

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Description

The Nooksack Dace is a small freshwater minnow that grows to less than 15 centimeters long. The species is one of several closely related dace that are found in the Pacific Northwest. It is part of the Chehalis fauna, a unique group of fish species that originated during the Pleistocene glaciation. The Nooksack Dace has a rounded back, flat underside, and long snout that overhangs its mouth. The species is greyish-green and has a dull brassy stripe over its lateral line. Its colouring gradually changes to silvery-white from below the lateral line to the belly. Sometimes Nooksack Dace have a black stripe in front of their eyes. The species has distinct pale marks near its dorsal fin that are visible when viewed from above. Young Nooksack Dace have a black lateral stripe and dark spot at the base of the tail. This species is difficult to distinguish from the Longnose Dace (Rhinichthys cataractae), a closely related species. (Updated 2017/07/19)

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Distribution and Population

The Nooksack Dace is only found in Washington State and four creeks in the Fraser Valley in British Columbia, Canada. The four Canadian populations of Nooksack Dace are found in: Bertrand Creek, Fishtrap Creek, Pepin Brook, and the Brunette River. The species exists as one designatable unit in Canada. The population size of Nooksack Dace in Canada is uncertain but probably does not exceed 10,000. Declines in the species probably occurred over the past half-century. (Updated 2017/07/19)

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Habitat

Adult Nooksack Dace are riffle specialists. This means they prefer shallow and moderately turbulent water. The species is typically found in fast-flowing streams with loose gravel, cobble, or boulder bottoms. Nooksack Dace spawn at the upstream end of riffles in coarse substrate and the young-of-the-year often stay in shallow, calm pools and glide downstream of riffles. (Updated 2017/07/19)

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Biology

From April to early July, Nooksack Dace spawn. Spawning takes place at night. Males guard small breeding territories. Females can produce two hundred to two thousand eggs. Eggs hatch in seven to ten days after spawning. Larvae stay in the gravel feeding on a yolk sac attached to their bellies. After about a week, young-of-the-year (Age 0) Nooksack Dace emerge and move to pools with sand or mud bottoms. As they develop, the young-of-the-year aggregate and move into shallow glide habitats close to riffles. After their first summer, they move into riffle habitat. Nooksack Dace mature at the end of their second summer and live for four to six years. Young Nooksack Dace feed on zooplankton while adults prey on insects. Predators of Nooksack Dace include fish species such as the Coastal Cutthroat Trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii clarkii), Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), and Largemouth Bass (Micropterus salmoides). (Updated 2017/07/19)

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Threats

Nooksack Dace populations appear to be the most vulnerable to sediment deposition and seasonal lack of water. Physical destruction of habitat including channelization, dredging and infilling, and habitat fragmentation also threaten the species. All of these activities can directly destroy, degrade and fragment stream habitat. The Nooksack Dace is a riffle habitat specialist and its distribution is limited by riffle habitat quality and availability. Riffle habitats are often targeted for modification in drainage projects. Many such modifications occur every year to streams in the Fraser Valley. The Nooksack Dace can also be negatively impacted by beaver ponds or human-made impoundments, deleterious substances and hypoxia caused by nutrient overload. (Updated 2017/07/19)

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Protection

Federal Protection

The Nooksack Dace is protected under the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA). More information about SARA, including how it protects individual species, is available in the Species at Risk Act: A Guide.

Provincial and Territorial Protection

To know if this species is protected by provincial or territorial laws, consult the provinces' and territories' websites.

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Recovery Initiatives

Status of Recovery Planning

Recovery Strategies :

Name Recovery Strategy for the Nooksack Dace (Rhinichthys cataractae) in Canada
Status Final posting on SAR registry

Name Revised Recovery Strategy for the Nooksack Dace (Rhinichthys cataractae) in Canada
Status Final posting on SAR registry

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Recovery Progress and Activities

The Nooksack Dace was listed under the Species at Risk Act as Endangered in 2003. In 2008, the Recovery Strategy for Nooksack Dace (Rhinichthys cataractae) in Canada was posted to the Species at Risk Public Registry. This document outlined goals and objectives to protect and recover the species. This included monitoring, restoring and enhancing the species’ critical habitat. The Habitat Stewardship Program funded several of these projects. For example, volunteer groups planted native plants in riparian zones. Public outreach lectures, presentations, and workshops have also been held. The Recovery Strategy identified critical habitat for the species, which became legally protected in 2016 by a Species at Risk Act Critical Habitat Order. An Action Plan for the species was published in 2017. (Updated 2017/07/19)

Documents

PLEASE NOTE: Not all COSEWIC reports are currently available on the SARA Public Registry. Most of the reports not yet available are status reports for species assessed by COSEWIC prior to May 2002. Other COSEWIC reports not yet available may include those species assessed as Extinct, Data Deficient or Not at Risk. In the meantime, they are available on request from the COSEWIC Secretariat.

81 record(s) found.

Reports on the Progress of Recovery Document Implementation

COSEWIC Status Reports

  • COSEWIC Assessment and Status Report on the Nooksack Dace (Rhinichthys cataractae) in Canada (2019-10-09)

    Nooksack Dace is a genetically and morphologically distinct form of the Longnose Dace (Rhinichthys cataractae). It is a member of the ‘Chehalis fauna’, a group of fishes that evolved during geographic isolation in a glacial refuge in present-day Washington State. R. cataractae morphology reflects a preference for fast-flowing riverine habitats. Relative to other R. cataractae populations in the Fraser and Columbia river basins, Nooksack Dace has a more slender tail and larger scales that are fewer in number. The largest recorded Canadian specimen measured 114 mm (snout to tail fork). It is of scientific interest in the study of evolutionary biology and biogeography. Note: This COSEWIC assessment was received by the Minister on October 15th, 2018.
  • COSEWIC Assessment and Update Status Report on the Nooksack dace (Rhinichthys cataractae ssp.) in Canada (2007-08-29)

    The Nooksack dace is a streamlined minnow, nearly round in cross-section, with a triangular head and a bulbous snout that overhangs the mouth. The pectoral fins are large, paddle-shaped, and used as hydrofoils in swift currents. Body colouration is grey-green above a dull, brassy lateral stripe and dirty white below it. Distinct pale marks occur on the back at each end of the dorsal fin. A black stripe is limited to the head in front of the eyes in adults, but continues down the flanks to the tail in juveniles. Males have slightly longer pectoral fins but the sexes are not otherwise distinguishable. The Nooksack dace is genetically distinct from other forms of R. cataractae in the Fraser and Columbia basin and physically separable from them in having fewer, larger scales. The largest recorded Canadian specimen measured 114 mm from snout to tail fork and weighed 16.1 g. The Nooksack dace is believed to be a subspecies of the longnose dace (Rhinichthys cataractae), but may be a separate species.
  • COSEWIC Status Report on the Nooksack Dace (Rhinichthys sp.) in Canada (2000-05-31)

    The Nooksack Dace is a small (up to about 105 mm in standard length) cyprinid fish widely distributed in the clear, relatively rapid rivers and streams of western Washington and southwestern B.C. It is a slim fish with a snout that clearly overhangs the mouth, a streamlined back and a flattened underside. The adults are grey green above with a dull brassy stripe just above the lateral line. The sides below the lateral line are dirty white grading into silver white on the underparts. Often there are scattered dusky speckles on the sides below the lateral line and a black stripe on the head in front of the eyes. There is no striking sexual dimorphism in colour, but males have conspicuously longer, and darker, pectoral fins than females. In juveniles there is a conspicuous black mid lateral stripe that extends from the snout back to a diffuse dark spot at the base of the tail.

Response Statements

  • Response Statement - Nooksack Dace (2007-12-04)

    The species is considered a habitat specialist dependent on stream riffles with loose, small grained substrates. This small fish is a representative of the Chehalis fauna, and considered to be a distinct subspecies of the longnose dace. It is known in Canada from only four locations in southwestern BC where its area of occupancy is severely limited, and subject to ongoing physical destruction of riffle habitat by urban, industrial and agricultural practices (e.g. dredging, channelization). Streams where the species is found are also impacted by lack of water in late summer due to ground and surface water extraction. Other activities have led to sediment accumulation in riffles caused by bank erosion resulting from gravel mining and/or runoff from urban storm drains, leading to further degradation of water quality and habitat.
  • Response Statement - Nooksack Dace (2020) (2020-01-07)

    This small fish is a habitat specialist dependent on stream riffles with loose, rocky substrates. In Canada, it is found in disjunct habitat patches in the Fraser River Valley Lowlands where its distribution is severely limited. It is subject to ongoing habitat loss by destruction of riffle habitat from urban, industrial, and agricultural practices. Streams where the species is found are also impacted by lack of water in late summer due to ground and surface water extraction and climate change. Sediment accumulation in riffles, caused by bank erosion resulting from gravel mining and/or runoff from urban storm drains, has led to further degradation of water quality and habitat.

Recovery Strategies

  • Recovery Strategy for Nooksack Dace (Rhinichthys cataractae ssp.) in Canada (2020-02-12)

    The Nooksack dace is a small (Rhinichthys cataractae. Within Canada it is known from four lowland streams in British Columbia’s Fraser Valley. The global distribution includes approximately 20 additional streams in north-west Washington (McPhail 1997). The Nooksack dace is extirpated from some tributaries in Canadian watersheds where it was abundant in the 1960s (McPhail 1997). Its current status in Washington State is unknown.

Action Plans

Critical Habitat Statements

  • Nooksack Dace in Canada: Critical Habitat Protection Statement (2008) (2008-12-05)

    This is a statement of how the critical habitat of Nooksack dace (Rhinichthys cataractae ssp.) is legally protected. This statement is pursuant to, and in compliance with, Section 58 (5) of the Species at Risk Act (SARA), S. C. 2002, c. 29.
  • Nooksack Dace in Canada: Critical Habitat Protection Statement (2010) (2010-07-29)

    This is a statement of how the critical habitat of Nooksack dace (Rhinichthys cataractae ssp.) is legally protected. This statement is pursuant to, and in compliance with, Section 58 (5) of the Species at Risk Act (SARA), S. C. 2002, c. 29. Critical habitat for the Nooksack dace was identified in the Final Recovery Strategy for this species, posted in June 2008 on the SARA Public Registry.  Please refer to the Recovery Strategy for details about the identified critical habitat. This statement hereby replaces the "Nooksack Dace in Canada: Critical Habitat Protection Statement" posted December 5, 2008.

COSEWIC Annual Reports

  • COSEWIC Annual Report - 2007 (2007-08-30)

    2007 Annual Report to the The Minister of the Environment and the Canadian Endangered Species Conservation Council (CESCC) from the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada.
  • COSEWIC Annual Report 2018 to 2019 (2019-10-09)

    Over the past year COSEWIC assessed a total of 56 wildlife species, 2 of which were assigned a status of not at risk. Of these 56, COSEWIC re-examined the status of 25 wildlife species; of these, the majority (80%) were reassessed at the same or lower level of risk. To date and with the submission of this report, COSEWIC’s assessments now include 799 wildlife species in various risk categories including 356 endangered, 189 threatened, 232 special concern, and 22 extirpated (that is, no longer found in the wild in Canada). In addition, 18 wildlife species have been assessed as extinct, 59 wildlife species have been designated as data deficient, and 199 have been assessed as not at risk.

Permits and Related Agreements

  • Explanation for issuing other simliar documents(#18-HPAC-00455 ), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2018-08-31)

    The activity involves road widening works along 1.8km of Mt. Lehman Road in Abbotsford, BC. Works will require the replacement of three road crossing culverts. Culvert replacement will require channel realignment, infilling at the outlet and inlet of each crossing and the removal of riparian vegetation. Road crossing 1 is located on Enns Brook, a tributary to Fishtrap Creek. Road crossings 2 and 3 are located within critical habitat for Nooksack Dace (Rhinichthys cataractae) in Fishtrap Creek. Both Nooksack Dace and Salish Sucker (Catostomus sp. cf. catostomus) are documented in Fishtrap Creek and Enns Brook. The site will be isolated and de-watered prior to construction. A fish salvage will be completed. The incidental capture and handling of Nooksack Dace and Salish Sucker is permitted to allow for relocation of individuals outside of the work area prior to construction. Fish salvage will be completed using a variety of methods including baited minnow traps, seine nets, dip nets and electrofishing. Offsetting works will be completed. Offsetting will include: works to maintain rearing and overwintering habitat otherwise disturbed during project works; the creation of riffle habitat suitable as both year-round Nooksack Dace habitat and as Salish Sucker spawning habitat; and the creation of deep pool off-channel pond habitat. The planting of native riparian vegetation will occur both on and off-site.
  • Explanation for issuing other simliar documents(#19-HPAC-00036 ), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2019-03-26)

    Twenty kilometers of aging gas main pipeline infrastructure will be replaced. A section of the pipeline crosses Stoney Creek, in an area designated as critical habitat for Nooksack Dace (Rhinichthys cataractae). The aerial pipeline crossing will be located within an existing utility right of way and will be installed parallel to and within 5m of the existing City of Burnaby Broadway bridge. The pipeline crossing will not require works in the creek but will impact riparian vegetation located within 10m of the high water mark of the creek. The pipeline crossing will be approximately 30m long and will be secured to a pipe bridge platform supported by bridge footings. The destruction of critical habitat within the riparian zone of Stoney Creek is permitted as a condition of the Fisheries Act Authorization. Riparian planting will be completed post-construction to offset the critical riparian habitat lost as a result of pipe bridge construction. Temporary alteration of riparian habitat outside of the critical habitat riparian zone including tree topping and trimming will also be required to allow for site access and pipe bridge installation. As all works are to be completed above the high water mark of Stoney Creek, a fish salvage is not required and the capture and handling of Nooksack Dace individuals is not permitted as a condition of the Fisheries Act Authorization.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#16-PPAC-00009), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2016-03-14)

    Sampling of Nooksack Dace and Salish Sucker for habitat restoration monitoring. Sampling and mark-recapture of Salish Sucker for population estimates. Lethal sampling of Nooksack Dace voucher specimens for genetic analysis and documentation of potentially unknown populations.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#17-HPAC-01290), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2018-02-20)

    The activity is a post-construction effectiveness monitoring sampling program to assess fish utilization of fish habitat compensation sites constructed as offsetting for the Fisheries Act Authorization 04-HPAC-PA1-00063. A requirement of the Fisheries Act Authorization is to monitor each fish habitat compensation site annually in the spring and fall for five years. The objective of the survey is to determine fish presence/absence and/or utilization of the compensation fish habitat and reference sites. Salvage methods will include kick seining, minnow trapping and single pass electrofishing, which may result in capture of individuals. The proposed sampling locations are not within the designated Critical Habitat or in the vicinity of identified Critical Habitat for Nooksack Dace (Rhinichthys cataractae). The sampling areas are also not within the distribution range of Nooksack Dace, but the permit is being sought as a precaution as the area is accessible to them.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#18-HPAC-00025), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2018-08-15)

    The project involves maintenance works on a wooden trestle bridge over the Brunette River in Burnaby, B.C. Wood stringers and pier caps will be replaced, with crews working from the bridge or scaffolding. Piles will be individually assessed and replaced as required. Prior to the onset of work activities, the site will be isolated and a fish salvage and relocation will be undertaken. These activities may result in the capture of individuals during execution of methods to exclude fish from the work area. Nooksack Dace (Rhinichthys cataractae) are known to be present in the watercourse, and the work area is within identified Critical Habitat for Nooksack Dace.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#18-HPAC-00333), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2018-08-15)

    The project involves the removal and replacement of two deteriorating culverts within Cave Creek and Pepin Creek. The worksite will be isolated and a fish salvage and relocation will be undertaken prior to the onset of work activities. These activities may result in the capture of individuals during execution of methods to exclude fish from the work area. The culvert crossing at Pepin Brook is within identified Critical Habitat for Salish Sucker (Catostomus sp. cf. catostomus) and Nooksack Dace (Rhinichthys cataractae). The culvert crossing at Cave Creek is within the distribution range for Salish Sucker and Nooksack Dace, but not within identified Critical Habitat for either species.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#18-HPAC-00692), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2018-09-05)

    The project involves road widening for 1.8 km along Mt. Lehman Road in Abbotsford, B.C., which will include the addition of north and southbound lanes. The additional lanes will require three culverts at Marshall Road and Mt. Lehman Road to be replaced, requiring water course realignments that will infill fish habitat and require riparian vegetation removal. The project received a Fisheries Act Authorization (18-HPAC-00455) with Species at Risk specific conditions, as the works are to take place in Nooksack Dace (Rhinichthys cataractae) Critical Habitat and within the distribution range of Salish Sucker (Catostomus sp. cf. catostomus). A Permit was also sought under the Species at Risk Act for the incidental capture, handling and relocation of Salish Sucker and Nooksack Dace for the purpose of removing fish during site isolation and fish salvage activities, related to the road widening works. The fish salvage will be completed prior to the onset of instream works. This SARA Permit solely focusses on the impacts to Salish Sucker and Nooksack Dace related to incidental capture, handling and relocation, as the other impacts are addressed in the Fisheries Act Authorization.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#18-HPAC-00830), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2018-10-04)

    The activity involves a pump test of a groundwater well near Bertrand Creek, which will take approximately six days. The pump test is required to determine the hydraulic connectivity of the Abbotsford-Sumas Aquifer to Bertrand Creek. Water will be pumped from the well then discharged to a storm system, which discharges directly back into Bertrand Creek. The rapid pumping rate required for the test has the potential to temporarily reduce flows in Bertrand Creek. To avoid potential fish-stranding, a fish salvage and relocation will be undertaken prior to the onset of work activities. These activities may result in the capture of individuals during execution of methods to exclude fish from the work area. Nooksack Dace (Rhinichthys cataractae ssp.) are known to be present in the work area. The location of the pumping activity is in a section of Bertrand Creek with is identified as Critical Habitat for Nooksack Dace.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-HPAC-00211), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-08-01)

    The proposed project involves replacing a failing culvert within Cave Creek. The existing culvert will be replaced with a box culvert of similar dimensions. New road base materials will be placed over the culvert sections, and rip rap will be installed at the inlet and outlet headwalls. Based on the time of year and seasonal hydrology, the worksite will likely be completely dry. If water is present, the worksite will be isolated and a fish salvage and relocation will be undertaken prior to the onset of work activities. These activities may result in the capture of Salish Sucker (Catostomus sp. cf. catostomus) and Nooksack Dace (Rhinichthys cataractae) individuals during execution of methods to exclude fish from the work area. Salish Sucker and Nooksack Dace are known to be present in the project area, but the site is not within identified Critical Habitat or in the vicinity of identified Critical Habitat for Salish Sucker or Nooksack Dace.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-HPAC-00230), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-08-01)

    The proposed activity involves machine maintenance works to remove accumulated sediment and debris from Gardner Park Pond, which is a tributary to Enns Brook. Sedimentation within the pond has resulted in a lack of functionality for both detention pond purposes and as quality habitat for a variety of aquatic organisms. The works will also involve grubbing of vegetation around the pond. Fish salvage and relocation will be undertaken prior to the onset of work activities. These activities may result in the capture of individuals during execution of methods to exclude fish from the work area. Gardner Park Pond is known to be seasonably accessible to Salish Sucker (Catostomus sp. cf. catostomus) and Nooksack Dace (Rhinichthys cataractae), but the works are not within the identified Critical Habitat for either species.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-HPAC-00249), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-06-21)

    The activity is a post-construction effectiveness monitoring program to assess fish utilization of fish habitat compensation sites constructed as offsetting for the Fisheries Act Authorization 04-HPAC-PA1-00063. A requirement of the Fisheries Act Authorization is to monitor each fish habitat compensation site annually in the spring and fall for five years. The objective of the survey is to determine fish presence/absence and/or utilization of the compensation fish habitat and reference sites. Sampling methods will include single pass electrofishing and possibly minnow trapping, which may result in capture of individuals. The proposed sampling locations are not within Critical Habitat or in the vicinity of identified Critical Habitat for Nooksack Dace (Rhinichthys cataractae), and the species is not being targeted in the program. The sampling areas are not within the distribution range of Nooksack Dace, but the permit is being sought as a precaution since the area is accessible to them.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-HPAC-00379), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-08-08)

    The activity involves the replacement of two steel Tainter Gates within a dam structure in the Brunette River. The worksite is a backwatered concrete apron which is covered in a 2 cm thick layer of silt/organic material. The area will be isolated and fish salvages and relocation will be undertaken prior to the onset of work activities. Fish salvage techniques will include pole seining and dip nets. These activities may result in the capture of individuals during execution of methods to exclude fish from the work area. The proposed work area is accessible to Nooksack Dace (Rhinichthys cataractae) individuals, but not within identified Critical Habitat. There is Critical Habitat downstream of the dam.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-HPAC-00588 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-09-18)

    The project involves the replacement of a failing culvert within Pepin Brook. The new culvert will be the same length as the existing culvert. The culvert will be replaced through open cut trenching and backfilled to existing standards. Minimal riprap will be placed at the inlet and outlet of the culvert for scour protection and sediment control. Flows will be maintained throughout construction and will be diverted through the second culvert currently present at the site. Fish salvage and relocation will be undertaken prior to the onset of work activities. These activities may result in the capture of individuals during execution of methods to exclude fish from the work area. Salish Sucker (Catostomus sp. cf. catostomus) and Nooksack Dace (Rhinichthys cataractae ssp.) are known to be present in the work area. The location of the proposed culvert replacement works are in a section of Pepin Brook which is identified Critical Habitat for Salish Sucker and Nooksack Dace, but does not contain the habitat features and functions or attributes that are necessary for the survival or recovery of the species.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-PPAC-00001), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-05-01)

    Activities consist of the following: Trapping by use of 24 hour sets of baited Feddes or Gee traps, beach or kick seining, anesthesia by use of MS222, length and weight measurements, subcutaneous elastomer injections for marking, recovery, and release at point of capture of Salish Sucker for population estimation surveys in Hopedale Slough, Salwein Creek, Salmon River, and Squemelwelh Slough. Trapping and taking whole body and genetic fin clip specimens to determine species of sucker in Chilliwack Lake. Trapping to further test a technique for assessing relative abundance of Nooksack Dace in Fishtrap and Bertrand Creek.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-PPAC-00026), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-11-20)

    Capture, enumeration, recovery from handling, and release of Salish Sucker and Nooksack Dace during fish community sampling using gee minnow traps in the Fishtrap Creek watershed.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#20-HPAC-00343 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2020-08-01)

    The activity involves the replacement of failing culverts at two locations within Pepin Brook in Abbotsford, BC. The existing culverts will be removed and replaced with culverts of larger dimension via open cut trenching and backfilling methods. The culvert inlet and outlet will be armoured with riprap to form a headwall. Invasive plant species located adjacent to the culvert replacement site will be removed, and the site will be revegetated. The culverts are located within an area designated as critical habitat for the Salish Sucker (Catostomus sp. cf. catostomus) and Nooksack Dace (Rhinichthys cataractae). A SARA permit was issued to allow for the capture and handling of Salish Sucker and Nooksack Dace during fish salvage. The permit does not allow for the killing of Salish Sucker or Nooksack Dace individuals nor does it authorization the destruction of critical habitat.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#20-HPAC-00429 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2020-08-01)

    The activity involves the removal of accumulated sediment and invasive aquatic vegetation for the purpose of agricultural channel maintenance in four sections of East Fishtrap Creek, Abbotsford, British Columbia. Two of the maintenance sites are within East Fishtrap Creek, with one site located north and one site located south of Charlotte Ave. The third site is located in North Livingstone Road Ditch. The fourth site is within the South Livingstone Road Ditch. The works are located in areas in which Salish Sucker (Catostomus sp. cf. catostomus) and Nooksack Dace (Rhinichthys cataractae ssp.) may be present. The first three locations are located within or adjacent to distribution range habitats for both species. The South Livingstone Road ditch site is located within Salish Sucker critical habitat. There is critical habitat for both species located upstream and/or downstream of the work locations. Sediment and vegetation will be excavated from the channel for offsite disposal, or side-cast along the channel bank and re-seeded upon project completion. The channel maintenance will restore drainage capability, improve flow conveyance and prevent the flooding of adjacent properties. The works will be completed in isolation from flow and fish. A SARA permit was issued to allow for the capture and handling of individuals of these species for the purpose of fish salvage. The killing of Salish Sucker and Nooksack Dace is not permitted. The destruction of fish habitat including critical habitat is not permitted.
  • >> See more Permits and Related Agreements documents

Critical Habitat Orders

  • Critical Habitat of the Nooksack Dace (Rhinichthys cataractae ssp.) Order (2020-08-05)

    Under SARA, the critical habitat of aquatic species must be legally protected within 180 days after the posting of the final recovery strategy or action plan on the SAR Public Registry. Critical habitat not mentioned in subsection 58(2) must be protected either by the application of the prohibition against the destruction of critical habitat in subsection 58(1), or by provisions in, or measures under, SARA or any other Act of Parliament, including agreements under section 11 of SARA. It is important to note that in order for another federal law to be used to legally protect critical habitat, it must provide an equivalent level of legal protection of critical habitat as would be afforded through subsection 58(1) of SARA, failing which, the Minister must make an order under subsections 58(4) and (5) of SARA. Therefore, this Critical Habitat of the Nooksack Dace (Rhinichthys cataractae ssp.) Order is intended to satisfy the obligation to legally protect critical habitat by triggering the prohibition under SARA against the destruction of any part of the species’ critical habitat.

Recovery Document Posting Plans

  • Recovery Document Posting Plan - Fisheries and Oceans Canada - Fiscal Year 2016-2017 (2018-09-28)

    Under the Species at Risk Act (SARA), the competent Minister(s) must prepare a recovery strategy within one year of listing a species on Schedule 1 of SARA as endangered and within two years of listing a species as extirpated or threatened. A management plan must be prepared within three years for a species listed as special concern. Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) is accountable for 111 of the 518 species listed under SARA. As of February 2016, proposed recovery strategies, management plans and action plans for 57 of those species have not yet been posted to the Species at Risk Public Registry. An additional 23 aquatic species have proposed management or action plans coming due in the future. The following outlines the Department’s plan for posting proposed documents for 64 species on the Species at Risk Public Registry. The Department has a plan to post recovery strategies for 9 species, management plans for 13 species, and action plans for 42 species over the next year. Original publication of the Recovery Document Posting Plan: 2016-05-02
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