Species Profile

Salish Sucker

Scientific Name: Catostomus sp. cf. catostomus
Other/Previous Names: Catostomus sp. ,Catostomus catostomus
Taxonomy Group: Fishes
COSEWIC Range: British Columbia
COSEWIC Assessment Date and Status Change: November 2012
COSEWIC Status: Threatened
COSEWIC Status Criteria: D2
COSEWIC Reason for Designation: This small fish has a restricted and fragmented range in southwestern British Columbia where it is susceptible to a continuing decline in habitat quality. An improvement in status from Endangered stems from a small increase in the number of known locations (from 9 to 14), including one location thought to have been extirpated, and some improvements in quality of habitat in areas subject to restoration.
COSEWIC History of Status Designation: Designated Endangered in April 1986. Status re-examined and confirmed in November 2002. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in November 2012.
SARA Status: Schedule 1, Threatened
Date of Listing (yyyy-mm-dd): 2005-01-12

Please note that this information is provided for general information purposes only. For the most up to date and accurate list of species listed under the Species at Risk Act, please see the Justice Laws Website.

Go to advanced search

Quick Links: | Taxonomy | Photo | Description | Distribution and Population | Habitat | Biology | Threats | Protection | Recovery Initiatives | National Recovery Program | Documents

Image of Salish Sucker

Salish Sucker Photo 1
Salish Sucker Photo 2

Top

Taxonomy

The Salish Sucker is sometimes referred to as a “species in the making.” It became separated from the Longnose Sucker, its closest relative, after the Pleistocene glaciation. It is genetically and physically distinctive, but it is unclear if these differences are significant enough for the fish to be considered a separate species.

Top

Description

The Salish Sucker is recognizable by its small (<25 cm) size, black backside, light stomach, dark green blotches, and fleshy-lipped mouth on the underside of its blunt snout. The species has larger scales and a shorter snout than the similar-looking Longnose Sucker. During the spawning season, a red band is visible along its sides (most prominently in males).

Top

Distribution and Population

Globally, the Salish Sucker is found only in the Puget Sound area of Washington State in the United States, and in the Fraser Valley of southwestern British Columbia, Canada. The Canadian population is dispersed among 11 watersheds (Salmon River, Little Campbell River, Bertrand Creek, Miami Creek, Chilliwack Delta, Agassiz Slough, Mountain Slough, Pepin Brook, Fishtrap Creek, Salwein Creek/Hopedale Slough, and Elk Creek/Hope Slough). The number of mature individuals is thought to be in the hundreds for most of these watersheds.

Top

Habitat

In British Columbia, the Salish Sucker is found in coastal streams and small rivers in the Fraser Valley. Deep pool habitat (<70 cm) is preferred for adult and juvenile feeding and rearing, whereas shallow pools (<40 cm) and glides are typically used by young of the year. Riffles with cobble or gravel bottoms are preferred for spawning. The Salish Sucker prefers water between 6 and 23°C, with dissolved oxygen equal to or greater than 4 mg/L for all life stages. Riparian habitats consisting of native vegetation are required to maintain such in-stream conditions.

Top

Biology

The Salish Sucker reaches maturity at approximately two years of age. Spawning typically occurs in the spring to early summer. Eggs adhere to the stream bottom and probably hatch in just over a week, depending on the temperature. Females may spawn more than once in a breeding season. Adults feed primarily on benthic insects; however, diet of young-of-the-year fish is unknown. Predators of Salish Sucker include otters, mink, and likely herons, kingfishers, trout, pikeminnow, bass, and bullhead. This species has a life span of approximately 5 years.

Top

Threats

Key threats to Salish Sucker include: hypoxia, physical destruction of habitat, habitat fragmentation, toxicity, sediment deposition, seasonal lack of water, increased predation, and riffle loss to beaver ponds.

Top

Protection

Federal Protection

The Salish Sucker is protected under the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA). More information about SARA, including how it protects individual species, is available in the Species at Risk Act: A Guide.

Provincial and Territorial Protection

To know if this species is protected by provincial or territorial laws, consult the provinces' and territories' websites.

Top

Recovery Initiatives

Status of Recovery Planning

Recovery Strategies :

Name Recovery Strategy for the Salish Sucker (Catostomus sp.) in Canada
Status First posting on SAR registry

Top

Recovery Progress and Activities

A recovery strategy (1st amendment) published in 2020 identified critical habitat and outlined the population and distribution objectives and broad strategies to recover the species. An amendment to the action plan for Salish Sucker and Nooksack Dace was posted to the Species at Risk Public Registry in October 2020 which outlines the measures that provide the best chance of achieving the population and distribution objectives for the species, including the measures to be taken to address the threats and monitor the recovery of the species implementation schedule for recovery measures. Many research and habitat restoration projects have been undertaken to contribute to the recovery of Salish Suckers. Projects include: inventory and monitoring surveys to obtain abundance estimates of known populations, assess winter habitat use, sample for unoccupied watersheds, and assess riparian habitat and water quality; riparian and instream habitat restoration and enhancement such as native planting, invasive plant removal, off-channel habitat creation, placement of gravel substrates; and public outreach to private landowners, students, naturalist groups, and local governments. Recovery activities have been completed with the support of and collaboration with Indigenous organizations, local environmental organizations, the Province of B.C., and local consultants.

Documents

PLEASE NOTE: Not all COSEWIC reports are currently available on the SARA Public Registry. Most of the reports not yet available are status reports for species assessed by COSEWIC prior to May 2002. Other COSEWIC reports not yet available may include those species assessed as Extinct, Data Deficient or Not at Risk. In the meantime, they are available on request from the COSEWIC Secretariat.

150 record(s) found.

COSEWIC Status Reports

  • COSEWIC Assessment and Status Report on the Salish Sucker Catostomus sp. cf. catostomus in Canada (2013-11-04)

    The Salish Sucker comprises a genetically and morphologically distinct group of populations within the Longnose Sucker (Catostomus catostomus) complex. It is small-bodied (to 287 mm in Canada), dark green mottled with black above, and dirty white below. Males display a broad red, lateral stripe during the spawning season. Scales are small, as is the mouth, which is located on the lower surface of the head. The Salish Sucker is a member of the ‘Chehalis fauna’, a unique fish community that survived continental glaciation in an ice-free refuge in Washington State. It may represent a ‘species in the making’ and is of considerable scientific interest in the study of evolution and the history and causes of animal distributions.

Response Statements

  • Response Statement - Salish Sucker (2013-12-18)

    This small fish has a restricted and fragmented range in southwestern British Columbia where it is susceptible to a continuing decline in habitat quality. An improvement in status from Endangered stems from a small increase in the number of known locations (from 9 to 14), including one location thought to have been extirpated, and some improvements in quality of habitat in areas subject to restoration.
  • Response Statements - Salish Sucker (2004-04-21)

    A response statement is a communications document that identifies how the Minister of the Environment intends to respond to the assessment of a wildlife species by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC). The document provides a start to the listing and recovery process for those species identified as being at risk, and provides timelines for action to the extent possible.

Recovery Strategies

  • Recovery Strategy for the Salish Sucker (Catostomus sp. cf. Catostomus ssp.) in Canada (2020-02-26)

    The Salish Sucker (Catostomus sp. cf. catostomus) is a small-bodied, fine-scaled fish documented in 11 British Columbia watersheds, all in the Fraser Valley. At least four other populations occur in northwestern Washington State. Salish Sucker populations have been in decline since at least the 1960s in Canada, and probably for longer.

Action Plans

Orders

  • Order Acknowledging Receipt of the Assessments Done Pursuant to Subsection 23(1) of the Species at Risk Act (2004-04-21)

    This Order acknowledges receipt by the Governor in Council of the assessments of the status of wildlife species done pursuant to subsection 23(1) of the Species at Risk Act (SARA) by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC). The purpose of SARA is to prevent wildlife species from being extirpated or becoming extinct, to provide for the recovery of wildlife species that are extirpated, endangered or threatened as a result of human activity and to manage species of special concern to prevent them from becoming endangered or threatened.
  • Order Amending Schedule 1 to the Species at Risk Act (Volume 153, Number 17, 2019) (2019-08-21)

    Biodiversity is rapidly declining at all scales, from local to global, as a result of a variety of human activities that increase the rates of species extinction. Current extinction rates are estimated to be between 1 000 and 10 000 times higher than the natural background rate. Higher species diversity positively supports healthy and productive ecosystems that are more resilient to disturbances, and, given the interdependency of species, a loss of biodiversity can lead to a declining resilience of ecosystem functions and services (e.g. natural processes such as pest control, pollination, coastal wave attenuation, pharmaceutical products, temperature regulation and carbon fixing). These services are vital to the health of all Canadians and are important for Canada’s economic well-being. Biodiversity loss can therefore result in adverse, irreversible and broad-ranging effects on Canadians.
  • Order Amending Schedules 1 to 3 to the Species at Risk Act (volume 139, number 2, 2005) (2005-01-12)

    Schedule 1, the List of Wildlife Species at Risk of the Species at Risk Act (SARA), is amended by Order of the Governor in Council (GIC), on the recommendation of the Minister of the Environment, by the addition of 73 species. This Order is based on scientific assessments by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) and follows consultations with provincial and territorial governments, Aboriginal peoples, stakeholders and the public, and analysis of costs and benefits to Canadians.

COSEWIC Annual Reports

  • COSEWIC Annual Report - 2003 (2003-10-01)

    May 2003 Annual Report to the Canadian Endangered Species Conservation Council by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada.
  • COSEWIC Annual Report – 2012-2013 (2013-09-24)

    Under Canada’s Species at Risk Act (SARA), the foremost function of COSEWIC is to “assess the status of each wildlife species considered by COSEWIC to be at risk and, as part of the assessment, identify existing and potential threats to the species”. COSEWIC held two Wildlife Species Assessment Meetings in this reporting year (October, 2012 to September 2013) from November 25 to November 30, 2012 and from April 28 to May 3, 2013. During the current reporting period, COSEWIC assessed the status or reviewed the classification of 73 wildlife species. The wildlife species assessment results for the 2012-2013 reporting period include the following: Extinct: 0 Extirpated: 2 Endangered: 28 Threatened: 19 Special Concern: 19 Data Deficient: 4 Not at Risk: 1 Total: 73 Of the 73 wildlife species examined, COSEWIC reviewed the classification of 50 species that had been previously assessed. The review of classification for 26 of those species resulted in a confirmation of the same status as the previous assessment.

Permits and Related Agreements

  • Explanation for issuing other simliar documents(#18-HPAC-00455 ), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2018-08-31)

    The activity involves road widening works along 1.8km of Mt. Lehman Road in Abbotsford, BC. Works will require the replacement of three road crossing culverts. Culvert replacement will require channel realignment, infilling at the outlet and inlet of each crossing and the removal of riparian vegetation. Road crossing 1 is located on Enns Brook, a tributary to Fishtrap Creek. Road crossings 2 and 3 are located within critical habitat for Nooksack Dace (Rhinichthys cataractae) in Fishtrap Creek. Both Nooksack Dace and Salish Sucker (Catostomus sp. cf. catostomus) are documented in Fishtrap Creek and Enns Brook. The site will be isolated and de-watered prior to construction. A fish salvage will be completed. The incidental capture and handling of Nooksack Dace and Salish Sucker is permitted to allow for relocation of individuals outside of the work area prior to construction. Fish salvage will be completed using a variety of methods including baited minnow traps, seine nets, dip nets and electrofishing. Offsetting works will be completed. Offsetting will include: works to maintain rearing and overwintering habitat otherwise disturbed during project works; the creation of riffle habitat suitable as both year-round Nooksack Dace habitat and as Salish Sucker spawning habitat; and the creation of deep pool off-channel pond habitat. The planting of native riparian vegetation will occur both on and off-site.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#16-PPAC-00009), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2016-03-14)

    Sampling of Nooksack Dace and Salish Sucker for habitat restoration monitoring. Sampling and mark-recapture of Salish Sucker for population estimates. Lethal sampling of Nooksack Dace voucher specimens for genetic analysis and documentation of potentially unknown populations.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#17-HPAC-00183 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2017-08-01)

    The activity involves replacement of a 2.4 km section of an existing transmission line within the city of Chilliwack B.C. The existing pipeline will be removed and the new pipeline will be installed in the same location. Three watercourse crossings will also be replaced, two by dam and pump or flume, and one by replacing the carrier pipe in an existing casing pipe. Prior to the start of works, a fish salvage and relocation will be undertaken. These activities may result in the capture of individuals during execution of methods to exclude fish from the work area. Salish Sucker (Catostomus sp. Cf. catostomus) are known to be present in all three watercourses (Chilliwack Creek, Semihault Creek and Semihault Prairie Central Diversion). The work areas in Chilliwack Creek and Semihault Prairie Central Diversion contain Critical Habitat for Salish Sucker. The work area in Semihault Creek is within Salish Sucker distribution range.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#17-HPAC-00240), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2017-08-15)

    The activity involves annual drainage maintenance works within Camp Slough, Atchelitz Creek, Chilliwack Creek and tributaries, Hope Slough and tributaries, and Salwein Creek and tributaries. The works comprise of the removal of excess sediment, instream vegetation, and non-native streamside vegetation that cause flow and conveyance restrictions. A culvert replacement will also be completed within Atchelitz Creek. Fish salvage and relocation will be undertaken prior to the onset of work activities for sections of the watercourse where flows are present. These activities may result in the capture of individuals during execution of methods to exclude fish from the work area. Salish Sucker (Catostomus sp. cf. catostomus) are known to be present in the work area. The maintenance works are scheduled to take place in watercourses that are within the distribution range for Salish Sucker, with some works occurring within or in the vicinity of identified Critical Habitat for Salish Sucker.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#17-HPAC-00336), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2017-08-01)

    The activity involves replacement of a 2.4 km section of an existing pipeline in Chilliwack, BC. In order to complete the works, two to three watercourse crossings will need to be replaced, either through dewatering or by replacing the carrier pipe within the existing casing pipe. Prior to any dewatering, a fish salvage and relocation will be undertaken. These activities may result in the capture of individuals during execution of methods to exclude fish from the work area. Salish Sucker (Catostomus sp. cf. catostomus) are known to be present in all three watercourses with in the project area (Chilliwack Creek, Semihault Creek, and Semihault Prairie Central Diversion). The work area within Chilliwack Creek and Semihault Prairie Central Diversion contain Critical Habitat for Salish Sucker. The work area in Semihault Creek is within Salish Sucker distribution range.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#17-HPAC-00486), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2017-07-15)

    The activity involves annual drainage maintenance works within multiple tributaries of Mountain Slough in Agassiz, B.C. The works comprise of the removal of excess sediment, instream vegetation, and non-native streamside vegetation that cause flow and conveyance restrictions. Fish salvage and relocation will be undertaken prior to the onset of work activities for sections of the watercourse where flows are present. These activities may result in the capture of individuals during execution of methods to exclude fish from the work area. Salish Sucker (Catostomus sp. cf. catostomus) are known to be present in the work area. The maintenance works are scheduled to take place in watercourses that are within the distribution range for Salish Sucker, with some works occurring within or in the vicinity of identified Critical Habitat for Salish Sucker.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#17-HPAC-00729 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2017-09-07)

    The activity involves bridge repair works over a section of Hope Slough in Chilliwack, B.C. Works include replacing the deck, rails and instream piles. The worksite will be isolated and a fish salvage will be undertaken prior to the onset of work activities. These activities may result in the capture of individuals during execution of methods to exclude fish from the work area. The work site is within identified Critical Habitat for Salish Sucker (Catostomus sp. cf. catostomus).
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#17-HPAC-01196), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2018-01-15)

    The project involves the replacement of a failing culvert along the main access road to a correctional facility in Agassiz, B.C. The worksite will be isolated and a fish salvage and relocation will be undertaken prior to the onset of work activities. These activities may result in the capture of individuals during execution of methods to exclude fish from the work area. Salish Sucker (Catostomus sp. cf. catostomus) are known to be present in the water course, but the worksite is not within or in the vicinity of identified Critical Habitat.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#18-HPAC-00194), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2018-08-01)

    The planned works are related to a restoration project to enhance habitat for Salish Sucker within the Salmon River. The worksite will be isolated and a fish salvage will be undertaken prior to the onset of work activities. These activities may result in the capture of individuals during execution of methods to exclude fish from the work area. Salish Sucker (Catostomus sp. cf. catostomus) are known to present within the watercourse and the work area is within identified Critical Habitat for Salish Sucker.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#18-HPAC-00227), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2018-08-15)

    The activity involves annual drainage maintenance works within Chilliwack Creek, Hope Slough, and their tributaries. The works comprise of the removal of excess sediment, instream vegetation, and non-native streamside vegetation that cause flow and conveyance restrictions. Fish salvage and relocation will be undertaken prior to the onset of work activities for sections of the watercourse where flows are present. These activities may result in the capture of individuals during execution of methods to exclude fish from the work area. Salish Sucker (Catostomus sp. cf. catostomus) are known to be present in the work area. The maintenance works are scheduled to take place in watercourses that are within the distribution range for Salish Sucker, with some works occurring within or in the vicinity of identified Critical Habitat for Salish Sucker.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#18-HPAC-00304), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2018-08-01)

    The project involves emergency bank erosion protection works to address slope failure at Hope Slough. The works will involve armouring the Hope Slough bank with angular rock and live staking the bank with native vegetation. Prior to the onset of work activities, the site will be isolated and a fish salvage and relocation will be undertaken. These activities may result in the capture of individuals during execution of methods to exclude fish from the work area. Salish Sucker (Catostomus sp. cf. catostomus) are known to be present in the watercourse and the work area is within identified Critical Habitat for Salish Sucker.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#18-HPAC-00333), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2018-08-15)

    The project involves the removal and replacement of two deteriorating culverts within Cave Creek and Pepin Creek. The worksite will be isolated and a fish salvage and relocation will be undertaken prior to the onset of work activities. These activities may result in the capture of individuals during execution of methods to exclude fish from the work area. The culvert crossing at Pepin Brook is within identified Critical Habitat for Salish Sucker (Catostomus sp. cf. catostomus) and Nooksack Dace (Rhinichthys cataractae). The culvert crossing at Cave Creek is within the distribution range for Salish Sucker and Nooksack Dace, but not within identified Critical Habitat for either species.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#18-HPAC-00383), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2018-08-01)

    The activity involves bridge upgrade works at the 72nd Avenue crossing of the Salmon River in Langley, B.C. Temporary isolation and pump bypass of the instream work area may be required, depending on the water level at the time of works. Fish salvage and relocation will be undertaken prior to dewatering the worksite. These activities may result in the capture of individuals during execution of methods to exclude fish from the work area. Salish Sucker (Catastomus sp. cf. catostomus) are known to be present in the Salmon River and the work area is within identified Critical Habitat for Salish Sucker.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#18-HPAC-00565), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2018-08-01)

    The proposed works involve bridge repair works at the 232 Street crossing of the Little Campbell River in Langley, B.C. The worksite will be isolated and a fish salvage will be undertaken prior to the onset of work activities. These activities may result in the capture of individuals during execution of methods to exclude fish from the work area. Salish Sucker (Catostomus sp. cf. catostomus) may be present within the work area but the works are not within identified Critical Habitat or in the vicinity of identified Critical Habitat for Salish Sucker.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#18-HPAC-00625), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2018-08-13)

    The proposed project involves culvert replacement works at Interception Ditch in Chilliwack B.C. The worksite will be isolated and a fish salvage will be undertaken prior to the onset of work activities. These activities may result in the capture of individuals during execution of methods to exclude fish from the work area. It is possible that Salish Sucker (Catostomus sp. cf. catostomus) may be present within the work area as Interception Ditch connects to a watercourse which is within the distribution range of Salish Sucker. Interception Ditch itself is not identified as being within the distribution range, nor is it identified as being within Salish Sucker Critical Habitat or its vicinity.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#18-HPAC-00636), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2018-08-01)

    The activity involves the construction of a new pump station, which will direct water across the dyke from Mountain Slough to the Fraser River. The existing pumps are not fish friendly and do not have the capacity to support forecasted flows. Fish salvage and relocation will be undertaken prior to dewatering the worksite. These activities may result in the capture of individuals during execution of methods to exclude fish from the work area. Salish Sucker (Catostomus sp. cf. catostomus) are known to be present in the Mountain Slough watercourse and the work area is in identified Critical Habitat for Salish Sucker.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#18-HPAC-00646), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2018-08-15)

    The activity involves annual drainage maintenance works within McCallum Ditch, Miami Creek, Hogg Slough and their tributaries. The works comprise of the removal of excess sediment, instream vegetation, and non-native streamside vegetation that cause flow and conveyance restrictions. Works are generally scheduled to be undertaken during periods of low/absent flow and anoxic conditions. Fish salvage and relocation will be undertaken prior to the onset of work activities for sections of the watercourse where flows are present. These activities may result in the capture of individuals during execution of methods to exclude fish from the work area. Salish Sucker (Catostomus sp. cf. catostomus) are known to be present in the work area. The maintenance works are scheduled to take place in watercourses that are within the distribution range for Salish Sucker, with some works occurring within or in the vicinity of identified Critical Habitat for Salish Sucker.
  • >> See more Permits and Related Agreements documents

Consultation Documents

  • Species at Risk Act - Legal Listing of Aquatic Species, Pacific Region - Consultation Workbook (2004-03-17)

    Your opinion is being sought to assist the government of Canada in making an informed decision on whether to add any or all of the following 10 aquatic species to the Schedule 1 (the List of Wildlife Species at Risk) of the Species at Risk Act (SARA). The species include: Blue Whale, Sei Whale, Humpback Whale, Enos Lake Stickleback, Speckled Dace, Salish Sucker, Cultus Lake Sockeye, Interior Fraser Coho, Sakinaw Lake Sockeye, and Bocaccio. Your input on the impacts of adding these species to the List is important. This workbook has been developed to give you an opportunity to provide Fisheries and Oceans Canada with your feedback, advice, and other comments regarding adding the above mentioned 10 species to Schedule 1 of SARA (Schedule 1 identifies which species are legally protected under SARA).

Critical Habitat Orders

  • Critical Habitat of the Salish Sucker (Catostomus catostomus ssp.) Order (2019-08-07)

    The Salish Sucker (Catostomus catostomus ssp.) is a small-bodied freshwater fish that has been documented in 11 southwestern British Columbia watersheds, all in the Fraser Valley. The species has been in decline since at least the 1960s and is susceptible to continuing habitat destruction. In November 2002, the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) assessed the status of the Salish Sucker and classified the species as an endangered species. In June 2005, the Salish Sucker was listed as endangered in Part 2 of Schedule 1 to the Species at Risk Act (SARA). In 2012, COSEWIC completed an updated status report and reassessment and designated the Salish Sucker as a threatened species

Recovery Document Posting Plans

  • Recovery Document Posting Plan - Fisheries and Oceans Canada - Fiscal Year 2016-2017 (2018-09-28)

    Under the Species at Risk Act (SARA), the competent Minister(s) must prepare a recovery strategy within one year of listing a species on Schedule 1 of SARA as endangered and within two years of listing a species as extirpated or threatened. A management plan must be prepared within three years for a species listed as special concern. Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) is accountable for 111 of the 518 species listed under SARA. As of February 2016, proposed recovery strategies, management plans and action plans for 57 of those species have not yet been posted to the Species at Risk Public Registry. An additional 23 aquatic species have proposed management or action plans coming due in the future. The following outlines the Department’s plan for posting proposed documents for 64 species on the Species at Risk Public Registry. The Department has a plan to post recovery strategies for 9 species, management plans for 13 species, and action plans for 42 species over the next year. Original publication of the Recovery Document Posting Plan: 2016-05-02
Date modified: