Species Profile

Blue Whale Atlantic population

Scientific Name: Balaenoptera musculus
Taxonomy Group: Mammals
COSEWIC Range: Atlantic Ocean
COSEWIC Assessment Date and Status Change: May 2012
COSEWIC Status: Endangered
COSEWIC Status Criteria: A2abd; D1
COSEWIC Reason for Designation: Whaling reduced the original population of this species. The population size is unknown but there are likely fewer than 250 mature individuals in Canada. There are also strong indications of a low calving rate and a low rate of recruitment into the population. The known causes of human-induced mortality of this species in Canada and elsewhere are ship strikes and entanglements in fishing gear. The species may also be vulnerable to disturbances due to increased noise in the marine environment and to changes in the abundance of its prey (zooplankton) through, for example, long-term changes in the climate.
COSEWIC History of Status Designation: The species was considered a single unit and designated Special Concern in April 1983. Split into two populations in May 2002. The Atlantic population was designated Endangered in May 2002. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2012.
SARA Status: Schedule 1, Endangered
Date of Listing (yyyy-mm-dd): 2005-01-12

Please note that this information is provided for general information purposes only. For the most up to date and accurate list of species listed under the Species at Risk Act, please see the Justice Laws Website.

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Related Species

Species COSEWIC
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Blue Whale Non-active Special Concern

Quick Links: | Photo | Description | Distribution and Population | Habitat | Biology | Threats | Protection | Other Protection or Status | Recovery Initiatives | Recovery Team | National Recovery Program | Documents

Image of Blue Whale

Blue Whale Photo 1

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Description

The Blue Whale is the largest animal known to have ever existed on the planet. It is a rorqual whale, a group of whales characterized by pleated grooves in the skin of the neck that allow the throat to expand during the intake of huge amounts of water during feeding. Blue Whales have between 60 and 88 of these throat grooves running from the throat to mid-body. Their tapered, elongated bodies are widest at the level of the eye, with the head accounting for about one-quarter of the total length. The dorsal fin is relatively small, and the pectoral flippers are pointed. Overall, Blue Whales are a mottled blend of dark and light shades of grey. The pattern of the mottling can vary considerably, but it is unique to each individual, and remains stable over time. It can therefore be used to identify individuals and track their movements and behaviour. The biggest Blue Whale ever recorded was 29.5 m long. Females are generally larger than males. Calves measure about 7 m at birth and weigh about 2 tons.

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Distribution and Population

Blue Whales are found in all the oceans of the world. Three subspecies are recognized. The Blue Whale that occurs in Canada is commonly known as the Northern Hemisphere subspecies. Two geographically separated populations exist in Canadian waters: one in the North Atlantic and the other in the North Pacific. The Atlantic population of Blue Whales frequents waters off eastern Canada. During spring, summer, and fall, these whales occur along the north shore of the Gulf of St. Lawrence and off eastern Nova Scotia. In summer they also occur off the south coast of the island of Newfoundland and in the Davis Strait, between Baffin Island and Greenland. They usually migrate south for the winter, but in years of light ice cover, some whales may remain in the St. Lawrence for much of the winter. We do not know how many Blue Whales there are in the Atlantic population, but between 20 and 105 Blue Whales are seen annually in the Gulf of St. Lawrence in photo identification studies. A total of 382 individuals have been catalogued in the Gulf since 1979. About 40% of these return regularly, while the remainder appear to be occasional visitors that typically range outside the Gulf of St. Lawrence.

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Habitat

Blue Whales range widely, inhabiting both coastal waters and the open ocean. Individuals belonging to the Atlantic population are frequently observed in estuaries and shallow coastal zones where the mixing of waters ensures high productivity of krill (small shrimp-like crustaceans about 2 cm long), the whales’ main food.

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Biology

Blue Whales migrate in small herds, spending the summer in food-rich areas close to the edge of the polar ice, and the winter in temperate waters. They feed almost exclusively on krill and one whale may eat as much as 4 tons per day. Blue Whales feed by gulping large quantities of krill, allowing both the water and crustaceans to enter the mouth. The water pressure causes the throat grooves to expand, allowing the whale to hold huge volumes of water in its mouth. The whale then uses its tongue and the muscles at the bottom of the mouth to push the water out through the baleen. Krill and other planktonic organisms become trapped in the fringes of the baleen plates, and the whale then swallows them. After breathing from 6 to 20 times at the water’s surface over a 1- to 5-minute period, Blue Whales generally dive for 5 to 15 minutes. Dives of 20 minutes are not uncommon, and rare dives of up to 36 minutes have been recorded in the St. Lawrence. Male and female Blue Whales reach sexual maturity at between 5 and 15 years of age, females when they measure from 21 to 23 m long and males at a length of 20 to 21 m. Mating and the birth of young take place during the fall and winter in the warmer southern waters. Females give birth, usually to a single calf, every two or three years after a gestation period of 10 to 11 months. It has been estimated that Blue Whales live from 70 to 80 years. They can swim at speeds of up to 36 km/hr, but typically cruise at 2 to 8 km/hr when they are feeding or travelling. In addition to being the largest animals on earth, Blue Whales are also the loudest: at up to 186 decibels their calls are louder than a jet (which reaches only 140 decibels). The calls, which vary among populations, have been described in some detail, but their function remains unclear. Current indications are that only the males make these long, loud calls.

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Threats

Past commercial whaling of Blue Whales is the main factor responsible for the decline in the animals' population. At least 11 000 Blue Whales were harvested in the North Atlantic before 1960. Approximately 1500 of these were harvested in eastern Canadian waters from 1898 to 1951. Since the end of commercial whaling, human threats have included collisions with ships, disturbance from increasing whale-watching activity, entanglement in fishing gear, and pollution (especially oil pollution).

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Protection

Federal Protection

The Blue Whale, Atlantic population, is protected under the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA). More information about SARA, including how it protects individual species, is available in the Species at Risk Act: A Guide.

It is also protected under the Marine Mammals Regulations, which fall under the Fisheries Act.

Provincial and Territorial Protection

To know if this species is protected by provincial or territorial laws, consult the provinces' and territories' websites.

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Other Protection or Status

Internationally, Blue Whales are protected by the International Whaling Commission. The Blue Whale is listed by both the World Conservation Union (IUCN) and the Convention on the International Trade of Endangered Species (CITES).

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Recovery Initiatives

Status of Recovery Planning

Recovery Strategies :

Name Recovery Strategy for the blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus), Northwest Atlantic population, in Canada
Status Final posting on SAR registry

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Recovery Team

Blue Whale (Atlantic population) Recovery Team

  • Species at Risk Program / Programme des espèces en péril - Chair/Contact - Fisheries and Oceans Canada
    Phone: 877-775-0848  Send Email

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Recovery Progress and Activities

Summary of Progress to Date The Saguenay-St. Lawrence Marine Park has introduced a number of regulations to better protect whales from whale-watching activities inside the park boundaries. Boaters (industrial, recreational and others) must comply with several regulatory measures such as limited observation periods, reduced speed, and maximum approach distances (400 m) when they are near endangered species, such as the Blue Whale. The number of vessels allowed within a certain distance from a cetacean is limited and there are strict policies in place concerning air traffic in the park. In addition, the marine park organizes a workshop-cruise every year for boaters and naturalists working on whale-watching vessels to familiarize themselves with proper techniques for approaching cetaceans. Throughout the fall of 2004, the Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) held a public consultation about the creation of a Marine Protected Area in the St. Lawrence Estuary. The purpose of this project is to ensure the long-term conservation and protection of marine mammals that live seasonally or year-round in the St. Lawrence Estuary and of their habitat and food resources. Summary of Research/Monitoring Activities Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) have been conducting studies on marine animal health since 1990. Causes of whale death are investigated to assess any potential threats to whale populations in their habitat. Recent research initiatives by this organization, in collaboration with the University of Dalhousie and the Mingan Island Cetacean Study (MICS) research organization also attempt to determine whether food availability would constitute a factor in what appears to be a reproduction failure of the Blue Whale. DFO and Parks Canada have been working with the Group for Research and Education on Marine Mammals (GREMM) to define the habitat needs of the Blue Whale and to assess the impact of boat traffic and whale-watching activities on the species within the St. Lawrence Estuary. The MICS research organization continues to do research on the distribution, stock identification, and seasonal movements of the Blue Whale in the North Atlantic. Photo-identification is being used to estimate population size, distribution, dispersal, and migratory patterns. Skin biopsies taken in conjunction with photo-identification provide sex and genetic information for each individual, which helps researchers to better understand Blue Whale stock, social structure and reproduction. The biopsies also provide information on contaminant loads. Vessel traffic patterns are being monitored along the west and east coasts of North America to minimize the risk of possible collisions between whales and vessels and the disturbance of critical whale habitats. Historical records are examined and ship-based and aerial surveys are conducted by DFO to identify areas of concentration of whales. Summary of Recovery Activities Outreach programs developed in the Newfoundland and Nova Scotia regions include toll-free hotlines, response to calls of dead and distressed marine animals, training for volunteers participating in rescue events, and education sessions targeted towards costal communities, industry, government and non-government organizations, and local schools. Marine conservation kits, including field testing of prototypes at local libraries, are being developed by Tangly Whales Inc. in Newfoundland as an interactive way to reach out to schools and other organizations, encouraging them to be more responsive in future stewardship activities. The Marine Animal Response Society (MARS) is working to develop and implement a cetacean sighting network in Nova Scotia and hopes to work with other groups in New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island to implement a Maritime-wide assistance network. The Grand Manan Whale and Seabird Research Station (GMWSRS) is developing a voluntary Code of Conduct for fishermen using fixed fishing gear near large whales in the Bay of Fundy. This will foster stewardship, provide information to prevent entanglement of whales and loss of fishing gear, and will promote education on endangered whales in the coastal communities of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. The Quebec Marine Mammal Emergency Response Network organizes, coordinates, and implements measures to reduce the accidental death of marine mammals, help animals in trouble, and intervene in cases of beached or drifting carcases in waters bordering the province of Quebec. People who navigate or live along the St. Lawrence are invited to call the toll-free recovery line to alert the Network to any such incidence. The Group for Research and Education on Marine Mammals (GREMM) receives and directs incoming Network calls 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. GREMM also publishes a weekly pamphlet, Portraits of Whales, which is distributed to cruise operators and guides throughout the whale-watching season. Portraits of Whales describes current research projects, interesting sightings made during the past week, hot issues, the portrait of a particular whale, and actions being taken to protect species at risk such as the St. Lawrence Blue Whales. URLs DFO: Large Whale Recovery Strategy:http://www.pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/sara/species/marinemammals/largewrecoverystr_e.htm DFO: The Blue Whale A Fragile Giant:http://ublib.buffalo.edu/libraries/e-resources/ebooks/records/eey3395.html Mingan Island Cetacean Study:http://www.rorqual.com/englisch/index.html Nature Canada: Endangered Species:http://www.cnf.ca/species/critters/blue.html Whale onlinehttp://www.whales-online.net/indexe.html Réseau d’observation des mammifères marins (in French only)http://www.romm.ca/ St. Lawrence Estuary Marine Protected Areahttp://www.qc.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/ZPMEstuaire/default_en.asp Saguenay–St. Lawrence Marine Parkhttp://www.parcmarin.qc.ca/ Quebec Marine Mammal Emergency Response Network:http://www.whales-online.net/eng/FSC.html?sct=2&pag=2-4-11.html

Documents

PLEASE NOTE: Not all COSEWIC reports are currently available on the SARA Public Registry. Most of the reports not yet available are status reports for species assessed by COSEWIC prior to May 2002. Other COSEWIC reports not yet available may include those species assessed as Extinct, Data Deficient or Not at Risk. In the meantime, they are available on request from the COSEWIC Secretariat.

135 record(s) found.

Reports on the Progress of Recovery Document Implementation

  • Report on the progress of recovery strategy implementation for the Blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus), Northwest Atlantic population, in Canada for the period 2009 - 2014 (2016-04-18)

    The Northwest Atlantic Blue Whale population was listed under the Species at Risk Act in 2005 as an endangered species. The Recovery Strategy for the Blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus), Northwest Atlantic population, was produced in collaboration with the Blue Whale Recovery Team and was posted on the Species at Risk Public Registry in 2009. This strategy includes recovery objectives aiming towards a better understanding of the population and its habitat, its threats and measures to mitigate them. It presents measures in research, conservation and outreach to guide the actions to be undertaken by the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) and by all stakeholders involved in the recovery of the Northwest Atlantic blue whale.

COSEWIC Status Reports

  • COSEWIC assessment and update status report on the Blue Whale Balaenoptera musculus in Canada (2002-05-01)

    The blue whale, Balaenoptera musculus (Linnaeus 1758) is the largest animal known to have lived on Earth with a maximum reported length of 33.6m (110ft) although the longest scientifically validated was 29.9m (98ft). Three subspecies have been designated: the largest B.m. intermedia is found in Antarctic waters; B.m. musculus in the Northern Hemisphere; and B.m. brevicauda, from the sub-Antarctic zone of the southern Indian Ocean and southwestern Pacific Ocean. Two geographically separated populations exist in Canadian waters, one in the western North Atlantic off eastern Canada and one off western Canada in the North Pacific.
  • COSEWIC Status Appraisal Summary on the Blue Whale Balaenoptera musculus, Atlantic Population in Canada (2013-01-03)

    The species was considered a single unit and designated Special Concern in April 1983. Split into two populations in May 2002. The Atlantic population was designated Endangered in May 2002. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2012.

Response Statements

  • Response Statement - Blue Whale, Atlantic population (2013-01-03)

    Whaling reduced the original population of this species. The population size is unknown but there are likely fewer than 250 mature individuals in Canada. There are also strong indications of a low calving rate and a low rate of recruitment into the population. The known causes of human-induced mortality of this species in Canada and elsewhere are ship strikes and entanglements in fishing gear. The species may also be vulnerable to disturbances due to increased noise in the marine environment and to changes in the abundance of its prey (zooplankton) through, for example, long-term changes in the climate.
  • Response Statements - Blue Whale (2004-04-21)

    A response statement is a communications document that identifies how the Minister of the Environment intends to respond to the assessment of a wildlife species by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC). The document provides a start to the listing and recovery process for those species identified as being at risk, and provides timelines for action to the extent possible.

Recovery Strategies

  • Recovery Strategy for the Blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus), Northwest Atlantic Population, in Canada (2010-02-02)

    The blue whale population (Balaenoptera musculus) in the Northwest Atlantic 1 was designated as endangered by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) in May 2002. This species was added to the Species at Risk Act (SARA) list as an endangered species in January 2005. Commercial whale hunting historically carried out in the Atlantic reduced the population by about 70%; at least 11,000 blue whales were killed before the 1960s including at least 1,500 animals in eastern Canada waters (Sergeant, 1966). Currently, the size of the Northwest Atlantic population is unknown, but it is unlikely that the number of mature animals exceeds 250 individuals according to experts’ estimates (Sears and Calambokidis, 2002). According to available information, blue whales use Atlantic coastal and pelagic Canadian waters mainly in the summer, to feed primarily on euphausiids (commonly known as krill).

Action Plans

Orders

  • Order Acknowledging Receipt of the Assessments Done Pursuant to Subsection 23(1) of the Species at Risk Act (2004-04-21)

    This Order acknowledges receipt by the Governor in Council of the assessments of the status of wildlife species done pursuant to subsection 23(1) of the Species at Risk Act (SARA) by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC). The purpose of SARA is to prevent wildlife species from being extirpated or becoming extinct, to provide for the recovery of wildlife species that are extirpated, endangered or threatened as a result of human activity and to manage species of special concern to prevent them from becoming endangered or threatened.
  • Order Amending Schedules 1 to 3 to the Species at Risk Act (volume 139, number 2, 2005) (2005-01-12)

    Schedule 1, the List of Wildlife Species at Risk of the Species at Risk Act (SARA), is amended by Order of the Governor in Council (GIC), on the recommendation of the Minister of the Environment, by the addition of 73 species. This Order is based on scientific assessments by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) and follows consultations with provincial and territorial governments, Aboriginal peoples, stakeholders and the public, and analysis of costs and benefits to Canadians.

COSEWIC Annual Reports

  • COSEWIC Annual Report - 2011-2012 (2012-10-05)

    Under Canada’s Species at Risk Act (SARA), the foremost function of COSEWIC is to “assess the status of each wildlife species considered by COSEWIC to be at risk and, as part of the assessment, identify existing and potential threats to the species”. COSEWIC held two Wildlife Species Assessment Meetings in this reporting year (September 1, 2011 to September 30, 2012) from November 21 to 25, 2011 and from April 29 to May 4, 2012. On February 3, 2012, an Emergency Assessment Subcommittee of COSEWIC also assessed the status of the Tri-colored Bat (Perimyotis subflavus), the Little Brown Myotis (Myotis lucifugus), and the Northern Myotis (Myotis septentrionalis). During the current reporting period COSEWIC assessed the status or reviewed the classification of 67 wildlife species. For species already found on Schedule 1 of SARA, the classification of 32 species was reviewed by COSEWIC and the status of the wildlife species was confirmed to be in the same category (extirpated - no longer found in the wild in Canada but occurring elsewhere, endangered, threatened or of special concern). The wildlife species assessment results for the 2011-2012 reporting period include the following: Extinct: 1 Extirpated: 4 Endangered: 29 Threatened: 10 Special Concern: 15 Data Deficient: 2 Not at Risk: 6 Total: 67 Of the 67 wildlife species examined, COSEWIC reviewed the classification of 49 species that had been previously assessed. The review of classification for 26 of those species resulted in a confirmation of the same status as the previous assessment (see Table 1a).

Permits and Related Agreements

  • Explanation for issuing licence(#DFO QUE MM04 2015), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2015-06-01)

    1) Disentanglement and freeing of marine mammals caught in fishing gear. 2) Deterrence, live capture, transportation, relocation and release of stray marine mammals when they are threatened by human activities or cause public safety issues. 3) Transportation or possession of marine mammal carcasses or body parts within Quebec's geographic boundaries.
  • Explanation for issuing licence(#DFO QUE MM05 2015), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2015-06-01)

    1) Disentanglement and freeing of marine mammals caught in fishing gear. 2) Deterrence, live capture, transportation, relocation and release of stray marine mammals when they are threatened by human activities or cause public safety issues. 3) Transportation or possession of marine mammal carcasses or body parts within Quebec's geographic boundaries.
  • Explanation for issuing licence(#DFO QUE MM06 2015), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2015-06-01)

    1) Disentanglement and freeing of marine mammals caught in fishing gear. 2) Deterrence, live capture, transportation, relocation and release of stray marine mammals when they are threatened by human activities or cause public safety issues. 3) Transportation or possession of marine mammal carcasses or body parts within Quebec's geographic boundaries.
  • Explanation for issuing licence(#DFO QUE MM07 2015), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2015-06-01)

    1) Disentanglement and freeing of marine mammals caught in fishing gear. 2) Deterrence, live capture, transportation, relocation and release of stray marine mammals when they are threatened by human activities or cause public safety issues. 3) Transportation or possession of marine mammal carcasses or body parts within Quebec's geographic boundaries.
  • Explanation for issuing licence(#DFO QUE MM08 2015), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2015-06-01)

    1) Disentanglement and freeing of marine mammals caught in fishing gear. 2) Deterrence, live capture, transportation, relocation and release of stray marine mammals when they are threatened by human activities or cause public safety issues. 3) Transportation or possession of marine mammal carcasses or body parts within Quebec's geographic boundaries.
  • Explanation for issuing licence(#DFO QUE MM09 2015), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2015-06-01)

    1) Disentanglement and freeing of marine mammals caught in fishing gear. 2) Deterrence, live capture, transportation, relocation and release of stray marine mammals when they are threatened by human activities or cause public safety issues. 3) Transportation or possession of marine mammal carcasses or body parts within Quebec's geographic boundaries.
  • Explanation for issuing licence(#DFO QUE MM14 2015), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2015-06-01)

    1) Disentanglement and freeing of marine mammals caught in fishing gear. 2) Deterrence, live capture, transportation, relocation and release of stray marine mammals when they are threatened by human activities or cause public safety issues. 3) Transportation or possession of marine mammal carcasses or body parts within Quebec's geographic boundaries.
  • Explanation for issuing licence(#DFO-18-PNCR-00001), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2018-06-18)

    The activities involve disentangling whales (including North Atlantic Right Whales, Blue Whale, Northern Bottlenose Whale, Beluga Whale, Fin Whale) , Sea Turtles (including Leatherback Sea Turtles and Loggerhead Sea Turtles), Dolphins and Porpoises from fishing gear and lines. The rescue activities include repeated close approaches at sea in small vessels, physically interacting with an individual for the purpose of securing, detangling, re-floating, freeing the individuals from gears, including fishing weirs, using standard protocols. In addition, activities involving dead animals include collection of biological information and the transfer of the animals to a location where necropsies can be conducted. There will be no tissue sample collection from live animals or tagging of live animals.
  • Explanation for issuing licence(#DFO-NL-4096-17 ), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2017-06-10)

    Building on previous field research and analyses research will be conducted in 2017 to continue research studies on the distribution, ecology, and status of Northern Bottlenose Whales (NBW) and population connectivity between the Gully Marine Protected Area (MPA) and the continental slope waters off Nova Scotia and Newfoundland. The research will support actions outlined in the Gully MPA Management Plan, the MPA Ecosystem Monitoring Framework and other DFO research priorities and initiatives. During the summer of 2017 surveys will be conducted in the slope waters off the Scotian Shelf and Newfoundland from a 12 m auxiliary research vessel. The research team will travel the 1000 m depth contour searching visually during daylight hours and acoustically using hydrophones for beaked whales between the Gully Canyon off eastern Nova Scotia and the Sackville Spur and Flemish Cap areas of the Grand Banks. If NBWs are located visually, they will be approached cautiously from the side or from behind at a speed of less than 5 knots to a distance of about 40 m. Several types of data will be collected: 1) the dorsal fins and melons will be photographed for ongoing photographic identification studies of the whales; 2) the sounds of the whales will be recorded with a towed hydrophone array; and 3) biopsies will be taken by extracting skin and blubber using a crossbow or air-gun and biopsy dart in accordance with methods used in previous studies of bottlenose whales. Skin and blubber samples will be retained, stored, transferred and processed to gather information on the genetics, diet and contaminant levels of NBWs. In addition researchers will collect opportunistic data supporting the work of the Mingan Island Cetacean Study (MICS) curating the North Atlantic Blue whale catalogue. Opportunistic photo-identification and biopsies will be performed on Blue whales that may be encountered using the same methods and system described above for beaked whales.
  • Explanation for issuing licence(#DFO-QUE-MM-02-2014), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2014-06-01)

    Ship surveys are conducted to observe and record marine mammal sightings. Whales are approached to identify individuals using standard photo-identification methods. Pictures are included in the North Atlantic blue whale catalogue and any information on identified individuals is entered in a long-term database. Biopsies are conducted at least once in a whale's lifetime to obtain genetic information and to determine gender and the relatedness of individuals. Biopsies also generate blubber samples, which are used to estimate toxic contaminant loads, hormone levels, and diet determined by fatty acid and stable isotope analysis. Suction cup tags will be attached to individuals to record their underwater movement and behavior in relation to prey. The research goals are to estimate the abundance, survival and reproduction rates, population trends, as other vital parameters of the whales of the St. Lawrence; to study their distribution and movements in order to describe habitat and habitat preferences and to study their contamination levels.
  • Explanation for issuing licence(#DFO-QUE-MM-03-2014), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2014-06-10)

    1) Disentanglement and freeing of marine mammals caught in fishing gear. 2) Deterrence, live capture, transportation, relocation and release of stray marine mammals when they are threatened by human activities or cause public safety issues. 3) Transportation or possession of marine mammal carcasses or body parts within Quebec's geographic boundaries.
  • Explanation for issuing licence(#DFO-QUE-MM-04-2014), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2014-06-10)

    1) Disentanglement and freeing of marine mammals caught in fishing gear. 2) Deterrence, live capture, transportation, relocation and release of stray marine mammals when they are threatened by human activities or cause public safety issues. 3) Transportation or possession of marine mammal carcasses or body parts within Quebec's geographic boundaries.
  • Explanation for issuing licence(#DFO-QUE-MM-05-2014), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2014-06-10)

    1) Disentanglement and freeing of marine mammals caught in fishing gear. 2) Deterrence, live capture, transportation, relocation and release of stray marine mammals when they are threatened by human activities or cause public safety issues. 3) Transportation or possession of marine mammal carcasses or body parts within Quebec's geographic boundaries.
  • Explanation for issuing licence(#DFO-QUE-MM-06-2014), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2014-06-10)

    1) Disentanglement and freeing of marine mammals caught in fishing gear. 2) Deterrence, live capture, transportation, relocation and release of stray marine mammals when they are threatened by human activities or cause public safety issues. 3) Transportation or possession of marine mammal carcasses or body parts within Quebec's geographic boundaries.
  • Explanation for issuing licence(#DFO-QUE-MM-07-2014), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2014-06-10)

    1) Disentanglement and freeing of marine mammals caught in fishing gear. 2) Deterrence, live capture, transportation, relocation and release of stray marine mammals when they are threatened by human activities or cause public safety issues. 3) Transportation or possession of marine mammal carcasses or body parts within Quebec's geographic boundaries.
  • Explanation for issuing licence(#DFO-QUE-MM-08-2014), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2014-06-10)

    1) Disentanglement and freeing of marine mammals caught in fishing gear. 2) Deterrence, live capture, transportation, relocation and release of stray marine mammals when they are threatened by human activities or cause public safety issues. 3) Transportation or possession of marine mammal carcasses or body parts within Quebec's geographic boundaries.
  • Explanation for issuing licence(#DFO-QUE-MM-13-2014), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2014-06-30)

    Photo-identification surveys, biopsies and telemetric monitoring are planned to investigate the behavioural ecology of the blue whale in the St. Lawrence with the objectives of studying frequentation and distribution patterns, habitat use and the relationship between abundance and distribution of the Blue Whale and of its prey.
  • >> See more Permits and Related Agreements documents

Consultation Documents

Recovery Document Posting Plans

  • Recovery Document Posting Plan - Fisheries and Oceans Canada - Fiscal Year 2016-2017 (2018-09-28)

    Under the Species at Risk Act (SARA), the competent Minister(s) must prepare a recovery strategy within one year of listing a species on Schedule 1 of SARA as endangered and within two years of listing a species as extirpated or threatened. A management plan must be prepared within three years for a species listed as special concern. Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) is accountable for 111 of the 518 species listed under SARA. As of February 2016, proposed recovery strategies, management plans and action plans for 57 of those species have not yet been posted to the Species at Risk Public Registry. An additional 23 aquatic species have proposed management or action plans coming due in the future. The following outlines the Department’s plan for posting proposed documents for 64 species on the Species at Risk Public Registry. The Department has a plan to post recovery strategies for 9 species, management plans for 13 species, and action plans for 42 species over the next year. Original publication of the Recovery Document Posting Plan: 2016-05-02
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