Species Profile

Black Redhorse

Scientific Name: Moxostoma duquesnei
Taxonomy Group: Fishes
COSEWIC Range: Ontario
COSEWIC Assessment Date and Status Change: May 2015
COSEWIC Status: Threatened
COSEWIC Status Criteria: B1ab(iii)+2ab(iii)
COSEWIC Reason for Designation: This species of fish has a limited extent of occurrence and area of occupancy. It is found only in a few rivers in southwestern Ontario, and is under continuing threats to habitat quality due to the cumulative impacts of pollution from urban wastewater and agriculture and alterations to flow regimes.
COSEWIC History of Status Designation: Designated Threatened in April 1988. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2005 and May 2015.
SARA Status: Schedule 1, Threatened
Date of Listing (yyyy-mm-dd): 2019-08-08

Please note that this information is provided for general information purposes only. For the most up to date and accurate list of species listed under the Species at Risk Act, please see the Justice Laws Website.

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Quick Links: | Photo | Description | Habitat | Biology | Threats | Protection | Recovery Team | National Recovery Program | Documents

Image of Black Redhorse

Black Redhorse Photo 1
Black Redhorse Photo 2

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Description

The Black Redhorse is one of the smallest suckers. In Canada, it reaches a length of 250 to 330 mm and a weight of 900 to 1 000 g. Normally, the back of the Black Redhorse is grey or olive brown, the sides are bluish silver and the belly is silver or white. The fins are slate grey to orange, and sometimes have a red glint. During the spawning season, males have a lateral pink stripe, and their backs and sides are greenish black. The mouth of the Redhorse Sucker, like that of most suckers, is found in the lower part of the nose, which allows it to suck up aquatic invertebrates from the bottom of rivers.

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Distribution and Population

There are no estimates on the size of the Canadian population of the Black Redhorse. In Canada, this fish in found in the Great Lakes basin; it has been seen in Catfish Creek and in the Grand, Thames and Maitland Rivers. Its distribution extends into the United States, in the Mississippi River system.

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Habitat

The Black Redhorse is found in medium-size rivers, where the river bed is composed of sand or gravel and bedrock substrates, where siltation is minimal and where the current is fairly strong. The Black Redhorse has typically been caught in waters that are oxygen rich and fertile which have a mean temperature of 20 °C in July.

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Biology

The Black Redhorse spawns at the end of May or the beginning of June; the spawning period lasts 7 to 8 days and intensifies when the water temperature nears 15 °C. Each female lays between 4 126 and 11 551 eggs, placed on a pile of gravel. Both sexes reach sexual maturity at 4 years and can then spawn every year.

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Threats

Dams built on the Grand and Thames Rivers have brought about changes in these rivers and have thus contributed to the disappearance of Black Redhorse spawning habitat. Few biologists can actually recognize the Black Redhorse; all suckers are grouped together during field observations, which has a negative effect on the information available for specific species.

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Protection

Federal Protection

The Black Redhorse is protected under the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA). More information about SARA, including how it protects individual species, is available in the Species at Risk Act: A Guide.

The fish habitat section of the Fisheries Act of Canada gives limited protection to the Black Redhorse. The Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources has given sections of the Nith River "sensitive environment" designations and has attempted to designate the Black Redhorse a peripheral species.

Provincial and Territorial Protection

To know if this species is protected by provincial or territorial laws, consult the provinces' and territories' websites.

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Recovery Team

Essex-Erie Recovery Team

  • Shawn Staton - Chair/Contact - Fisheries and Oceans Canada
    Phone: 905-336-4864  Fax: 905-336-6437  Send Email

Grand River Recovery Team

  • Shawn Staton - Chair/Contact - Fisheries and Oceans Canada
    Phone: 905-336-4864  Fax: 905-336-6437  Send Email

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Documents

PLEASE NOTE: Not all COSEWIC reports are currently available on the SARA Public Registry. Most of the reports not yet available are status reports for species assessed by COSEWIC prior to May 2002. Other COSEWIC reports not yet available may include those species assessed as Extinct, Data Deficient or Not at Risk. In the meantime, they are available on request from the COSEWIC Secretariat.

37 record(s) found.

COSEWIC Status Reports

Response Statements

  • Response Statement - Black Redhorse (2015-12-23)

    This species of fish has a limited extent of occurrence and area of occupancy. It is found only in a few rivers in southwestern Ontario, and is under continuing threats to habitat quality due to the cumulative impacts of pollution from urban wastewater and agriculture and alterations to flow regimes.
  • Response Statements - Black Redhorse (2005-11-15)

    A freshwater fish with a very small, highly fragmented distribution and area of occupancy, as well as restricted spawning habitat preferences. Native populations are found in only 5 Ontario watersheds in areas heavily impacted by urbanization and agriculture. It is at risk of habitat loss and degradation as a result of increased siltation and  turbidity. Dams may adversely affect flow regimes and have fragmented populations in the two major rivers where this species occurs.

Recovery Strategies

  • Recovery Strategy and Action Plan for the Black Redhorse (Moxostoma duquesnei) in Canada (2021-07-29)

    The Black Redhorse is a member of the sucker family (Catostomidae) and is one of seven redhorse species found in Canada. Black Redhorse typically grows to an average length of 40 cm, making it one of the smaller redhorse species found in Canada. The species has an olive, gold or brassy dorsal surface with paler sides and a silver or white ventral surface. Its range is limited to eastern North America, where it is found in the Mississippi and Great Lakes basins. In Canada, the species is restricted to southwestern Ontario, specifically, tributaries of Lake Huron (Sauble, Saugeen, Maitland, Bayfield, and Ausable rivers), Lake St. Clair (Thames River), and Lake Erie (Grand River). The Black Redhorse plays a role in benthic-pelagic coupling as it transfers energy from the benthic food web where it feeds, to the pelagic food web where it is preyed upon by piscivorous fishes.

Orders

  • Order Acknowledging Receipt of the Assessments Done Pursuant to Subsection 23(1) of the Act (2007) (2007-05-16)

    This Order acknowledges receipt by the Governor in Council of the assessments of the status of 40 species done pursuant to paragraph 15(1)(a) and in accordance with subsection 23(1) of the Species at Risk Act (SARA) by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC). The purpose of SARA is to prevent wildlife species from being extirpated or becoming extinct, to provide for the recovery of wildlife species that are extirpated, endangered or threatened as a result of human activity and to manage species of special concern to prevent them from becoming endangered or threatened.
  • Order Amending Schedule 1 to the Species at Risk Act (volume 141, number 26, December 13, 2007) (2007-12-26)

    Her Excellency the Governor General in Council, on the recommendation of the Minister of the Environment, pursuant to section 27 of the Species at Risk Act, hereby makes the annexed Order Amending Schedules 1 to 3 to the Species at Risk Act.
  • Order Amending Schedule 1 to the Species at Risk Act (Volume 153, Number 17, 2019) (2019-08-21)

    Biodiversity is rapidly declining at all scales, from local to global, as a result of a variety of human activities that increase the rates of species extinction. Current extinction rates are estimated to be between 1 000 and 10 000 times higher than the natural background rate. Higher species diversity positively supports healthy and productive ecosystems that are more resilient to disturbances, and, given the interdependency of species, a loss of biodiversity can lead to a declining resilience of ecosystem functions and services (e.g. natural processes such as pest control, pollination, coastal wave attenuation, pharmaceutical products, temperature regulation and carbon fixing). These services are vital to the health of all Canadians and are important for Canada’s economic well-being. Biodiversity loss can therefore result in adverse, irreversible and broad-ranging effects on Canadians.
  • Order Extending the Time for the Assessment of the Status of Wildlife Species (2006-06-14)

    The time provided for the assessment of the status of the wildlife species set out in the schedule is extended for 3 years from the day on which section 14 of the Species at Risk Act comes into force.

COSEWIC Annual Reports

  • COSEWIC Annual Report - 2005 (2005-08-12)

    2005 Annual Report to the Canadian Endangered Species Conservation Council (CESCC) from the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada.
  • COSEWIC Annual Report - 2014-2015 (2015-11-20)

    Under Canada’s Species at Risk Act (SARA), the foremost function of COSEWIC is to "assess the status of each wildlife species considered by COSEWIC to be at risk and, as part of the assessment, identify existing and potential threats to the species". COSEWIC held two Wildlife Species Assessment Meetings in this reporting year (October, 2014 to September, 2015) from November 23 to November 28, 2014 and from April 27 to May 1, 2015. During the current reporting period, COSEWIC assessed the status or reviewed the classification of 56 wildlife species. The wildlife species assessment results for the 2014-2015 reporting period include the following: Extinct: 0 Extirpated: 1 Endangered: 21 Threatened: 11 Special Concern: 21 Data Deficient: 1 Not at Risk: 1 Total: 56 Of the 56 wildlife species examined, COSEWIC reviewed the classification of 40 that had been previously assessed. The review of classification for 24 of those wildlife species resulted in a confirmation of the same risk status as the previous assessment.

Permits and Related Agreements

  • Explanation for issuing other simliar documents(#17-HCAA-01438 ), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2019-12-04)

    The County of Wellington is replacing the Badley Bridge that spans the Grand River in the downtown core of the Village of Elora. The works will require the complete removal of the existing bridge structure and construction of a new three-span bridge. Two new in-water piers will be required, and their footings will occupy areas of the riverbed that are presently considered fish habitat. Construction will proceed over a period of 2 years, with Phase 1 construction of two new permanent in-water piers below the bridge using a temporary rock-fill work platform, and two cofferdams to undertake the removal of the old structure and the construction of the new pier footings. The in-water work platform will remain in place over the winter of 2019-2020, while the cofferdams shall be removed before the restricted timing window for the focal reach of the Grand River. Construction access will be provided from the south bank with construction of an access ramp in the southeast quadrant to a rock fill platform. Phase 2 demolition of the existing structure will begin once Phase 1 works are complete. A temporary in-water rock platform, construction access, and cofferdams will facilitate construction of the bridge piers, pier caps, and superstructure. The works, undertakings, or activities associated with the proposed project described above that are likely to result in the harmful alteration, disruption, or destruction of fish habitat include the installation of an access road comprised of clean rip rap covering 724 m2 of the Grand River, for 11 months; construction of cofferdams composed of polyethylene-lined, pea gravel-filled sandbags to isolate 131 m2 of the Grand River, while maintaining downstream flows and fish passage by leaving at least one third of the wetted width of the Grand River unobstructed; and, the installation of two pier footings (82 m2) and armouring of these new piers with a total of 69 m2 of rip rap. As the aforementioned activities involve in-water work, they all have the potential to affect the Black Redhorse (Moxostoma duquesnei) and Silver Shiner (Notropis photogenis), and thus would be considered incidental to carrying out the work.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-HCAA-00470 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2021-07-01)

    This permit involves the incidental capture of Redside Dace (Clinostomus elongatus) and Black Redhorse (Moxostoma duquesnei) during site isolation, dewatering, and fish relocation activities. The proposed work at Highway 21 at Gully Creek will involve the following activities: the replacement of a concrete arch barrel culvert (39.8 m long and 7.3 m wide) with a 43 m long, single span bridge; the retention of a 5.7 m long section of the concrete spillway (maximum 60 m2) with a 11.3% slope to maintain the fish barrier, in order to protect upstream populations of Redside Dace. Boulders will be added to a spillway plunge pool to limit large-bodied fish passage into Redside Dace habitat. The area will be dewatered and a fish rescue will be carried out within the timing window to protect Redside Dace and Black Redhorse. The construction of a 43 m single span bridge with the abutments located above the high water level is planned. The streambed within the area of the culvert will be restored using natural channel design principles with riffle-pool sequencing. A channel realignment of 60 m2 is required to tie-in the channel with the upstream. The floodplain area will be regraded and re-vegetated according to the detailed design drawings, and the existing drainage culverts that convey highway runoff will be replaced, with vegetated ditches using Turf Reinforcement Mat.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-HCAA-02012 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2020-05-13)

    The Township of Centre Wellington plans to repair three exiting stone piers on the historical Victoria Street Bridge in Elora, ON, over the Grand River. This will require the installation of an access road comprised of clean rip rap covering 420 m2 of the Grand River for four months. The access road will not extend past 50% of the wetted width and will be intersected with five 900 mm diameter by 18 m long corrugate steel pipe culverts to maintain downstream flow and fish passage. It will also involve the construction of three cofferdams composed of non-permeable pea gravel filled bags to isolate 370 m2 of the Grand River for three months as well as repair to three existing piers in the Grand River, expanding each pier's footprint by 10 m2, effectively removing 30 m2 of fish habitat from the Grand River. As the aforementioned activities involve in-water work, they all have the potential to affect Black Redhorse (Moxostoma duquesnei) and Silver Shiner (Notropis photogenis), and thus the harm would be considered incidental to carrying out the work.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-PCAA-00028 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-08-21)

    The objective of the activities covered by this permit are to conduct fish and mussel surveys in the Thames River watershed. Baseline data collected will be used to assist in future project proposals and inquiries. Species at risk listed on the permit may be captured incidentally during surveys. The activities authorized by the permit consist of: 1. The incidental capture of any of the species listed on the permit from the Thames River watershed. Fish sampling will be completed through the use of a backpack electrofishing unit. Mussel surveys will adhere to Mackie et al. (2008); 2. The handling of any of the species listed on the permit for the purposes of identification and processing. Fishes will be identified, counted, and released alive with the exception of some smaller fishes that may be retained to confirm identification. All mussels will be returned alive to the locations they were found; and, 3. The possession and transport of any species listed on the permit killed incidentally or for vouchering purposes.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-PCAA-00056 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-08-21)

    The objective of the activities covered by the permit are to conduct early detection surveillance sampling for Asian carps in nearshore areas and tributaries of the Canadian waters of the Great Lakes basin. A total of 36 early detection sites have been selected in the Great Lakes basin. The species listed on the permit may be captured incidentally during the course of work. The activities authorized by the permit consist of: 1. The capture of the species listed on the permit from the locations listed on the permit using fyke nets, gill nets, hoopnets, trap nets, trammel nets, light traps, boat electrofishing, boat seining, bongo nets, seine nets, backpack electrofishing, and/or trawling; 2. The handling of the species listed on the permit for the purposes of identification and processing (count and photograph). With the exception of vouchers that may be retained to confirm identification, all fishes will be released alive after processing. Vouchers will be collected using digital cameras, but some vouchers of smaller fishes may be retained to confirm identification if digital vouchers cannot be collected; and, 3. The possession and transport of the species listed on the permit killed incidentally or for vouchering purposes.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-PCAA-00062 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-09-27)

    The objectives of the activities covered by the permit are to collect a lethal sub-sample of common fishes from the Thames River watershed in order to measure microplastic levels in wild fishes, and to explore covariation with sediment microplastic levels. The species listed on the permit may be captured incidentally. The activities authorized by the permit consist of: 1. The incidental capture of species listed on the permit using backpack electrofishing and seine netting from six locations in the Thames River watershed. Fishes will be sampled opportunistically, with a maximum of 10 individuals of a single species, and 60 fishes total collected at each site; 2. The handling of the species listed on the permit for the purposes of identification (count, measure, and photograph). With the exception of vouchers that may be retained to confirm identification, all species at risk fishes will be released alive after processing; any mussels encountered will be photographed and released alive at their location of capture; and, 3. The possession and transport of any of the species listed on the permit killed incidentally or for vouchering purposes.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#20-HCAA-00518 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2020-04-23)

    The proponent proposes to replace the existing nine-span Argyle Street Bridge with a new five-span bridge on the Grand River in Caledonia, Ontario. The new bridge will be built adjacent to the existing bridge using temporary piers constructed on temporary work platforms (causeway pods). Five causeway pods will be installed to access the existing bridge and install the temporary and permanent bridge piers. A clear-span access bridge will be positioned between each causeway pod to allow construction equipment to move between pods. The height of the causeway pods will be designed for a one year storm event and will be in place for approximately 2-3 years. Once the new piers are constructed, the replacement bridge will be jacked up and slid onto the pier, and the causeway pods and connected bridges will be removed from the river. The proposed works were authorized by the Fisheries Act Authorization acting as a Species at Risk Act (SARA) permit 14-HCAA-01831, which covered the impacts to Eastern Sand Darter (Ammocrypta pellucida) (Ontario populations), Mapleleaf (Quadrula quadrula) (Great Lakes - Upper St. Lawrence populations), and Round Pigtoe (Pleurobema sintoxia). Since the issuance of the authorization, the status of Mapleleaf has changed to Special Concern in the Grand River. Since its issuance, Black Redhorse (Moxostoma duquesnei), Silver Shiner (Notropis photogenis), Fawnsfoot (Truncilla donaciformis), and Threehorn Wartyback (Obliquaria reflexa) were listed under SARA, and are potentially present in the Grand River. A SARA permit is required for the sub-lethal impacts that may occur during construction activities to these four additional species at risk.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#20-PCAA-00008 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2020-04-03)

    The objectives of the activities covered by the permit include conducting fish and mussel surveys in the Thames River watershed. Species listed on the permit may be captured incidentally. The activities authorized by this permit consist of: 1. The capture of any of the species listed from the Thames River watershed. Fish sampling will be completed through the use of a backpack electrofishing unit. Mussel surveys will adhere to Mackie et al. (2008); 2. The handling of any of the listed species for the purposes of identification and processing. Fishes will be identified, counted, and released alive, with the exception of some smaller fishes that may be retained to confirm identification. All mussels will be returned alive to the locations they were found; and, 3. The possession and transport of any species listed on the permit killed incidentally.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#20-PCAA-00017 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2020-05-07)

    The objective of the activities covered by the permit are to collect a lethal sub-sample of common fishes from the Upper Thames River watershed in order to measure microplastic levels in wild fishes and explore covariation with sediment microplastic levels. Black Redhorse (Moxostoma duquesnei), Silver Shiner (Notropis photogenis), and Round Pigtoe (Pleurobema sintoxia) may be captured incidentally. The activities authorized by the permit consist of: 1. The incidental capture of species listed above using backpack electrofishing and seine netting from six locations in the Upper Thames River watershed. Fishes will be sampled opportunistically, with a maximum of ten individuals of a single species, and 60 fishes total collected at each site; 2. The handling of the species listed above for the purposes of identification (count, measure, and photograph). With the exception of vouchers that may be retained to confirm identification, all species at risk fishes will be released alive after processing; any mussels encountered will be photographed and released alive at location of capture; and, 3. The possession and transport of any of the species listed on the permit killed incidentally or for vouchering purposes.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#20-PCAA-00032 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2020-07-17)

    The objective of the activities covered by the permit are to conduct Black Redhorse (Moxostoma duquesnei) surveys at historical capture locations and potential new locations in the Ausable River, Ontario. The activities authorized by the permit consist of: 1. The capture of Black Redhorse using a seine net and/or backpack electrofishing, from the Ausable River watershed; 2. The handling of Black Redhorse for the purposes of identification (count, measure, and photograph). With the exception of vouchers that may be retained to confirm identification, all fishes will be released alive after processing; and, 3. The possession and transport of any Black Redhorse killed incidentally as a result of sampling, processing, or for vouchering purposes.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#20-PCAA-00034 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2020-07-17)

    The objective of the activities covered by the permit are to conduct fish community surveys within long-term monitoring stations in the Spencer Creek watershed, Ontario. Black Redhorse (Moxostoma duquesnei) and Redside Dace (Clinostomus elongatus) may be captured incidentally during this work. The activities authorized by the permit consist of: 1. The capture of Black Redhorse and Redside Dace, via backpack electrofishing, from the Spencer Creek watershed; 2. The handling of Black Redhorse and Redside Dace for the purposes of identification (count, measure, and photograph). With the exception of vouchers that may be retained to confirm identification, all fishes will be released alive after processing; and, 3. The possession and transport of Black Redhorse and Redside Dace killed incidentally as a result of sampling and/or processing or for vouchering purposes.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#20-PCAA-00036 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2020-07-23)

    The objectives of the activities covered by the permit are to conduct fish community surveys in the lower Thames River and its tributaries, within the jurisdiction of the Lower Thames River Conservation Authority, in Ontario. The species listed on the permit may be captured incidentally during this work. The activities authorized by the permit consist of: 1. The capture of the species listed on the permit via seining (fishes) and quadrat/visual surveys (mussels), from the lower Thames River watershed; 2. The handling of the species listed on the permit for the purposes of identification (count, measure, and photograph). With the exception of vouchers that may be retained to confirm identification, all fishes will be released alive after processing. Any mussels captured will be released alive at the location of capture; and, 3. The possession and transport of the species listed on this permit killed incidentally as a result of sampling and/or processing or for vouchering purposes (fishes only).
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#21-PCAA-00012 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2021-03-23)

    The objective of the activities covered by the permit is to determine the distribution and habitat preferences of native and non-native benthic fishes, from southern Lake Huron through western Lake Erie (including the St. Clair River, Lake St. Clair, and Detroit River). Black Redhorse (Moxostoma duquesnei), Channel Darter (Percina copelandi) (Lake Erie populations), Eastern Sand Darter (Ammocrypta pellucida) (Ontario populations), Northern Madtom (Noturus stigmosus), Pugnose Shiner (Notropis anogenus), and Silver Chub (Macrhybopsis storeriana) (Great Lakes - Upper St. Lawrence populations) may be captured during these surveys. The activities authorized by this permit consist of: 1. The capture of the species listed above from the watersheds listed above using minnow traps, trawls, larval drift nets, fyke nets, boat electrofishing, dozer trawl, trammel nets, and gill nets; 2. The handling of the species listed on the permit for the purposes of identification and processing (count, measure, and photograph). Fishes collected will be identified, counted, and released alive, with the exception of some smaller fishes that may be retained to confirm identification; and, 3. The possession and transport of any species listed on the permit killed incidentally or for vouchering purposes.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#21-PCAA-00015 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2021-04-09)

    The objective of the activities covered by the permit is to conduct fish and mussel surveys in the Thames River watershed, in Ontario. Black Redhorse (Moxostoma duquesnei), Eastern Sand Darter (Ammocrypta pellucida) (Ontario populations), Silver Shiner (Notropis photogenis), Fawnsfoot (Truncilla donaciformis), Kidneyshell (Ptychobranchus fasciolaris), Rayed Bean (Villosa fabalis), Round Pigtoe (Pleurobema sintoxia), and Threehorn Wartyback (Obliquaria reflexa), may be captured incidentally. The activities authorized by this permit consist of: 1. The capture of any of the species listed on the permit from the Thames River watershed. Fish sampling will be completed through the use of a backpack electrofishing unit. Mussel surveys will adhere to the methods of Mackie et al. (2008); 2. The handling of any of the species listed previously for the purposes of identification and processing (count, measure, and photograph). Fishes will be identified, counted, and released alive with the exception of some smaller fishes that may be retained to confirm identification. All mussels will be returned alive to the locations they were found; and, 3. The possession and transport of any species listed on the permit killed incidentally.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#21-PCAA-00019), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2021-05-05)

    The objective of the activities covered by the permit are to conduct fish community surveys within long-term monitoring stations in the Spencer Creek watershed near Hamilton, Ontario. Black Redhorse (Moxostoma duquesnei) and Redside Dace (Clinostomus elongatus) may be captured incidentally during this work. The activities authorized by the permit consist of: 1. The capture of Black Redhorse and Redside Dace, via backpack electrofishing, from the Spencer Creek watershed; 2. The handling of Black Redhorse and Redside Dace for the purposes of identification (count, measure, and photograph). With the exception of vouchers that may be retained to confirm identification, all fishes will be released alive after processing; and, 3. The possession and transport of Black Redhorse and Redside Dace killed incidentally as a result of sampling and/or processing or for vouchering purposes.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#21-PCAA-00022 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2021-05-05)

    The objectives of the activities covered by the permit include: 1. Conducting fish and mussel community surveys within locations in the lower Thames River watershed (from Delaware, ON, to the mouth), lower Thames River tributaries, Rondeau Bay and tributaries, McGeachy Pond, Lake Erie tributaries (between Two Creeks and Talbot Creek), and Lake St. Clair tributaries (between the mouth of the Thames River to Boyle Drain); and, 2. To conduct targeted seining surveys for Eastern Sand Darter (Ammocrypta pellucida) (Ontario populations) within the Thames River. The 19 species at risk (SAR) listed on the permit may be captured incidentally during this work. The activities authorized by the permit consist of: 1. The capture of the species listed on this permit via seining (fishes) and quadrat or visual surveys (mussels), from the locations listed previously; 2. The handling of the species listed on the permit for the purposes of identification (count, measure, and photograph). With the exception of vouchers that may be retained to confirm identification, all fishes will be released alive after processing. Any mussels captured will be released alive at the location of capture; and, 3. The possession and transport of the species listed on the permit killed incidentally as a result of sampling and/or processing, or for vouchering purposes.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#21-PCAA-00025 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2021-05-17)

    The objectives of the activities covered by the permit are to conduct surveys for the species listed on the permit in the Thames River watershed, Grand River watershed, Sydenham River watershed, L-Lake, Old Mouth Lake, and Old Ausable Channel, in southwestern Ontario; and, to conduct research to investigate specific temperature thresholds and micro-habitat mapping for Lake Chubsucker (Erimyzon sucetta) and Pugnose Shiner (Notropis anogenus) in the L-Lake, Old Mouth Lake, and Old Ausable Channel through critical thermal (CT) max trials. The activities authorized by this permit consist of: 1. The capture of the species listed on the permit from the previously listed waterbodies using seine nets, fyke nets, mamou trawls, fine mesh bottom trawl, and backpack electrofishing; 2. The handling of Lake Chubsucker and Pugnose Shiner for the purposes of running CT max trials. Lake Chubsucker and Pugnose Shiner will be transferred to a flow-through bin in the lake at the sample site. Individually, fish will be placed in a ten gallon tank with a heater that will increase the water temperature by the standard heating rate of 0.33°C/minute. Fishes will be monitored for agitation behaviours, including sudden bursts of rapid movement, increased ventilation rate, and attempts to jump out of the tank. The trial will terminate when fishes demonstrate a loss of equilibrium (inability to keep self upright for greater than five seconds). Fishes will immediately be removed from the tank, weighed, measured for total length, fin clipped, and then placed in a recovery bin. After recovery, fishes will be returned to the location of capture; 3. The handling of the species listed on the permit for the purposes of identification (count, measure, fin clip, tag [radio and visual implant elastomers], and photograph). With the exception of vouchers that may be retained to confirm identification, all fishes will be released alive after processing; and, 4. The possession and transport of Lake Chubsucker and/or Pugnose Shiner fin clips, and any species listed on the permit killed incidentally as a result of sampling or processing.
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Consultation Documents

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