Species Profile

Sei Whale Pacific population

Scientific Name: Balaenoptera borealis
Taxonomy Group: Mammals
COSEWIC Range: Pacific Ocean
COSEWIC Assessment Date and Status Change: May 2013
COSEWIC Status: Endangered
COSEWIC Status Criteria: A2ad; D1
COSEWIC Reason for Designation: Individuals off the coast of British Columbia are likely part of a northeastern Pacific population that was depleted by whaling. The infrequency of observations (visual and acoustic) suggests that numbers in Canada are currently very low (well below 250 mature individuals) and reports of this species are similarly rare in adjacent US waters to the north (Alaska) and south (Washington, Oregon, California). Threats to this species along the coast of British Columbia are poorly known, but may include ship strikes, anthropogenic noise, and long-term changes in climate (which could affect the abundance of their zooplankton prey).
COSEWIC History of Status Designation: Designated Endangered in May 2003. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2013.
SARA Status: Schedule 1, Endangered
Date of Listing (yyyy-mm-dd): 2005-01-12

Please note that this information is provided for general information purposes only. For the most up to date and accurate list of species listed under the Species at Risk Act, please see the Justice Laws Website.

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Quick Links: | Photo | Description | Distribution and Population | Habitat | Biology | Threats | Protection | Other Protection or Status | Recovery Initiatives | Recovery Team | National Recovery Program | Documents

Image of Sei Whale

Sei Whale Photo 1

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Description

The Sei Whale is a rorqual whale and belongs to the same family as the Blue Whale. This group of whales is characterized by pleated grooves in the skin of the neck that allow the throat to expand during the intake of water during feeding. Its back and sides are dark grey or bluish-grey in colour, while the ventral surface and throat grooves are greyish-white. There is a lot of individual variation in coloration — some individuals may have a white or light area on the flippers, and a white streak may extend to behind the ear. The flipper or the flukes are dark grey or bluish, and the body often has a galvanized appearance as a result of light-coloured scars inflicted by various predators or parasites. The jaw, lips, and mouth cavity are uniformly grey. Sei Whales are generally 14 to 15 m long, and weigh about 20 tonnes; females are generally about 0.5 m longer than males. In temperate waters, Sei Whales can be confused with Fin and Minke whales, potentially resulting in an underestimation of population sizes. It is necessary to get a look at the right jaw or the ventral portion of the tail to be sure of the identification.

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Distribution and Population

The Sei Whale is a cosmopolitan species, with a patchy distribution in all of the oceans of the world. It is found off both the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of Canada. The Atlantic population was also assessed by COSEWIC in 2003 and found to be Data Deficient. The Sei Whale Pacific population is found in the waters off British Columbia, where its northern limit is suggested to be about 55?N. There have been no sightings of Sei Whales off Canada’s Pacific coast since commercial whaling was halted in 1976. There has, however, been limited survey effort and Sei Whales may have been mistaken for Fin or Minke whales. Population estimates of 7 000 to 13 000 individuals, published in 1977 for the whole North Pacific, are still cited today.

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Habitat

It favours temperate, deep offshore habitat more than other species of large whales. Records kept during commercial whaling off British Columbia indicate that less than 0.5% of the Sei Whales were caught on the continental shelf. In summer, Sei Whales do not move as far toward the polar waters as other great whales and do not usually enter icy water.

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Biology

Sei Whales reach sexual maturity between 5 and 15 years of age, and may live as long as 60 years. The gestation period is estimated to be 10 to 12 months, with conception and calving occurring in winter. Calves are weaned on the feeding grounds after a lactation period of about six months, and the calving interval is two to three years. Sei Whales do not only “gulp feed” like others rorqual whales, they also skim for prey while swimming through the water. Their short, ventral pleats and fine baleen are well-suited to the skimming strategy. They feed primarily on various types of plankton, but will also eat schooling fish and squid. Sei Whales are usually found in small groups of two to five, although many more may be seen together when food is plentiful. Sei Whales are preyed upon by Killer Whales. Sei Whales are exceptionally fast swimmers. It has been estimated that a Sei Whale could reach 56 kmh (30 knots) in its first rush after being struck with a harpoon. A marked individual in the southern ocean moved 4100 km (2200 nautical miles) in a 10-day period, implying an average speed of 17 kmh (9 knots). Migration speeds are likely to be somewhat slower. As is typical of baleen whales, Sei Whales migrate from low-latitude wintering areas to high-latitude summer feeding grounds. There is evidence from catch records that migrations in all basins were segregated according to length (i.e. age), sex, and reproductive status. Pregnant females appear to lead the migration to the feeding grounds, while the youngest animals arrive last and leave first, and do not go as far poleward.

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Threats

Currently there are no known species-specific factors limiting the recovery of Sei Whales; the threats to which they are exposed are indirect. Concerns include habitat loss and degradation through competition with commercial fisheries, vessel noise and traffic, seismic exploration, chemical contamination, and competition with some species of fish.

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Protection

Federal Protection

The Sei Whale, Pacific population, is protected under the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA). More information about SARA, including how it protects individual species, is available in the Species at Risk Act: A Guide.

The Marine Mammal Regulations of the federal Fisheries Act prohibit disturbance of marine mammals except for purposes of hunting, for which a permit is required. None of the species’ range is currently protected in Canadian waters.

Provincial and Territorial Protection

To know if this species is protected by provincial or territorial laws, consult the provinces' and territories' websites.

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Other Protection or Status

The Sei Whale is on the IUCN (World Conservation Union) Red List of Threatened Animals. It is also included in Appendix I of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), which sets controls on the international trade and movement of species that have been, or may be, threatened due to commercial exploitation. The International Whaling Commission has classified the North Pacific stock of the Sei Whale as “Protected.” This designation prohibits commercial whaling, but not whaling for the collection of scientific data.

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Recovery Initiatives

Status of Recovery Planning

Recovery Strategies :

Name Recovery Strategy for Blue, Fin, and Sei Whales (Balaenoptera musculus, B. physalus, and B. borealis) in Pacific Canadian Waters
Status Final posting on SAR registry

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Recovery Team

Blue, Fin, Sei and North Pacific Right Whale Action Plan Technical Team

  • Jonathan Thar - Chair/Contact - Fisheries and Oceans Canada
    Phone: 604-666-3811  Fax: 604-666-3341  Send Email

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Recovery Progress and Activities

Summary of Progress to Date Internationally, Sei and Fin Whales are listed as ’protected’ by the International Whaling Commission and as ‘endangered’ by the IUCN (World Conservation Union). A multi-species recovery strategy that includes the Pacific Sei and Fin Whales has been developed. Its goal is to attain long-term viable populations of the Sei and Fin Whales in Pacific Canadian waters through critical habitat identification, determining species abundance and distribution, and threat mitigation. The Vancouver Aquarium Marine Science Centre along with the Cetus Research and Conservation Society are working to conserve the marine environment by promoting community stewardship and research and by fostering activities that directly assist in the recovery of whales, including Sei and Fin Whales. Summary of Research/Monitoring Activities Fisheries & Oceans Canada’s Cetacean Research Program and participants conduct annual surveys to estimate the number of Fin Whales and determine the presence of Sei Whales in Pacific Canadian waters. Whenever possible, individual whales sighted during these surveys are photographed for identification and comparison with catalogues of whales sighted in U.S. waters. Acoustic monitoring using submersible passive acoustic recording devices also is being undertaken. Opportunistic sightings of dolphins, porpoises, and whales have been collected by the Vancouver Aquarium Marine Science Centre’s BC Cetacean Sightings Network since 1972 which help to determine distribution as well as relative abundance of many species, including Sei and Fin Whales. The Cetus Research and Conservation Society also are working with a network of volunteers to solicit, collect, verify, and record whale sightings. Summary of Recovery Activities The Vancouver Aquarium Marine Science Centre compared traffic patterns of the shipping industry with areas of high densities of Fin Whale sightings to determine areas at high risk of ship strikes. The BC Cetacean Sightings Network is supported by activities promoting community stewardship, including: interactive webpage, online blogs and news page, youth-oriented publications, posters, and maintaining relationships with observers who contribute to sighting records. Fisheries & Oceans Canada have a Marine Mammal Incident Response Program to respond to incidents involving marine mammals, including Sei and Fin Whales. Incidents may include violations of the Fisheries Act and/or the Species at Risk Act; live strandings; dead, sick or injured animals; or entanglements. All incidents involving Sei and Fin Whales in Pacific Canadian waters are compiled by the program and will be used to better identify threats and develop specific mitigation strategies. Fisheries & Oceans Canada is developing predictions of Sei and Fin Whale habitat to focus survey effort and identify ‘potential’ habitat, an important component to the identification of critical habitat. The Cetus Research and Conservation Society work to reduce overall impacts on marine animals through ’Straitwatch’. Providing education to northern Vancouver Island residents and visitors, Straitwatch increases awareness of conservation issues and local marine species at risk like the Sei and Fin Whale. A stewardship vessel patrols areas of concern providing marine mammal guidelines and species at risk information to boaters while monitoring activities that may be potentially harmful to vulnerable species. The Pacific North Coast Integrated Management Area ocean planning initiative will incorporate mitigation strategies to address threats to species at risk and to protect critical habitat(s) on the North Coast of British Columbia, focusing on the Queen Charlotte Basin (Queen Charlotte Sound to Hecate Strait). The marine area extends to the bottom of the shelf slope and therefore includes a significant portion of on-shelf habitat for Sei and Fin Whales in Pacific Canadian waters.

Documents

PLEASE NOTE: Not all COSEWIC reports are currently available on the SARA Public Registry. Most of the reports not yet available are status reports for species assessed by COSEWIC prior to May 2002. Other COSEWIC reports not yet available may include those species assessed as Extinct, Data Deficient or Not at Risk. In the meantime, they are available on request from the COSEWIC Secretariat.

31 record(s) found.

Reports on the Progress of Recovery Document Implementation

COSEWIC Status Reports

  • COSEWIC assessment and status report on the sei whale Balaenoptera borealis in Canada (2013-12-31)

    The sei (pronounced "say") whale (Balaenoptera borealis) is the third largest member of the Balaenopteridae family, after the blue (B. musculus) and fin (B. physalus) whales. The name is an anglicization of "sejhval", given by Norwegian whalers because its arrival in Scandinavian waters coincided with the "seje", or pollock (Pollachius virens) (Andrews 1916).

Response Statements

  • Response Statement - Sei Whale, Pacific population (2013-12-18)

    Individuals off the coast of British Columbia are likely part of a northeastern Pacific population that was depleted by whaling. The infrequency of observations (visual and acoustic) suggests that numbers in Canada are currently very low (well below 250 mature individuals) and reports of this species are similarly rare in adjacent US waters to the north (Alaska) and south (Washington, Oregon, California). Threats to this species along the coast of British Columbia are poorly known, but may include ship strikes, anthropogenic noise, and long-term changes in climate (which could affect the abundance of their zooplankton prey).
  • Response Statements - Sei Whale (2004-04-21)

    A response statement is a communications document that identifies how the Minister of the Environment intends to respond to the assessment of a wildlife species by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC). The document provides a start to the listing and recovery process for those species identified as being at risk, and provides timelines for action to the extent possible.

Recovery Strategies

  • Recovery Strategy for Blue, Fin, and Sei Whales (Balaenoptera musculus, B. physalus, and B. borealis) in Pacific Canadian Waters (2006-07-14)

    This Recovery Strategy provides the scientific basis to recover the populations of blue, fin and sei whales that occur in Pacific Canadian waters off the coast of British Columbia. Knowledge about these whales is poor in Pacific Canadian waters. Therefore the collection of basic data on abundance and distribution, critical habitat, and threats is the first priority for their recovery. As information is gathered, the Recovery Strategy may be amended to incorporate new findings (a copy of the amendment must be included in the public registry).

Action Plans

  • Action Plan for Blue, Fin, Sei and North Pacific Right Whales (Balaenoptera musculus, B. physalus, B. borealis, and Eubalaena japonica) in Canadian Pacific Waters (2017-03-09)

    This action plan addresses the entire set of populations of Blue, Fin, Sei and North Pacific Right Whales (Balaenoptera musculus, B. physalus, B. borealis, and Eubalaena japonica) in Canadian Pacific waters. It identifies recovery measures to implement the broad goals and objectives outlined in the Recovery Strategy for Blue, Fin and Sei Whales in Pacific Canadian Waters (Gregr et al. 2006), and the Recovery Strategy for North Pacific Right Whales (DFO 2011). All four species are being considered together because of their similar geographic distribution, common threats to survival, and the efficiency of integrating activities and resources required for recovery.
  • Multi-species Action Plan for Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve, National Marine Conservation Area Reserve, and Haida Heritage Site (2016-07-04)

    The Multi-species Action Plan for Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve, National Marine Conservation Area Reserve, and Haida Heritage Site meets the requirements for an action plan set out in the Species at Risk Act (SARA (s.47)) for species requiring an action plan that occur inside the boundary of the site. This action plan will be updated to more comprehensively include measures to conserve and recover the marine species at risk once the first integrated Land, Sea, People management plan for Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve, National Marine Conservation Area Reserve & Haida Heritage Site (hereafter called Gwaii Haanas) is complete. Measures described in this plan will also provide benefits for other species of conservation concern that regularly occur in Gwaii Haanas.

Orders

  • Order Acknowledging Receipt of the Assessments Done Pursuant to Subsection 23(1) of the Species at Risk Act (2004-04-21)

    This Order acknowledges receipt by the Governor in Council of the assessments of the status of wildlife species done pursuant to subsection 23(1) of the Species at Risk Act (SARA) by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC). The purpose of SARA is to prevent wildlife species from being extirpated or becoming extinct, to provide for the recovery of wildlife species that are extirpated, endangered or threatened as a result of human activity and to manage species of special concern to prevent them from becoming endangered or threatened.
  • Order Amending Schedules 1 to 3 to the Species at Risk Act (volume 139, number 2, 2005) (2005-01-12)

    Schedule 1, the List of Wildlife Species at Risk of the Species at Risk Act (SARA), is amended by Order of the Governor in Council (GIC), on the recommendation of the Minister of the Environment, by the addition of 73 species. This Order is based on scientific assessments by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) and follows consultations with provincial and territorial governments, Aboriginal peoples, stakeholders and the public, and analysis of costs and benefits to Canadians.

COSEWIC Annual Reports

  • COSEWIC Annual Report – 2012-2013 (2013-09-24)

    Under Canada’s Species at Risk Act (SARA), the foremost function of COSEWIC is to “assess the status of each wildlife species considered by COSEWIC to be at risk and, as part of the assessment, identify existing and potential threats to the species”. COSEWIC held two Wildlife Species Assessment Meetings in this reporting year (October, 2012 to September 2013) from November 25 to November 30, 2012 and from April 28 to May 3, 2013. During the current reporting period, COSEWIC assessed the status or reviewed the classification of 73 wildlife species. The wildlife species assessment results for the 2012-2013 reporting period include the following: Extinct: 0 Extirpated: 2 Endangered: 28 Threatened: 19 Special Concern: 19 Data Deficient: 4 Not at Risk: 1 Total: 73 Of the 73 wildlife species examined, COSEWIC reviewed the classification of 50 species that had been previously assessed. The review of classification for 26 of those species resulted in a confirmation of the same status as the previous assessment.

Permits and Related Agreements

  • Explanation for issuing licence(#16-PPAC-00005 ), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2016-02-11)

    Authorized representatives from DFO, the Animal Health Center and the Vancouver Aquarium are licensed to collect for diagnostic purposes: all tissues, organ fluids and/or blood of dead salvaged parts or surplus material collected from dead marine mammals and turtles.
  • Explanation for issuing licence(#18-PPAC-00027 ), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2018-06-26)

    The California Current Cetacean and Ecosystem Assessment Survey is a scientific study designed to assess the status of marine mammal stocks and monitor the ecosystem they inhabit. Data on cetacean distribution, school size, and school composition are collected to determine abundance. Cetacean skin biopsies will be used to investigate stock structure and phylogenic relationships. Photographs will document geographic and individual variation. Oceanographic data will characterize cetaceans' habitat and it's variation over time.
  • Explanation for issuing licence(#19-PPAC-00034 ), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2019-07-07)

    The study aims at determining sound propagation (detectability over distance) for Killer Whale calls within their habitat including natural and anthropogenic noise conditions. The activities permitted under this license shall assess Killer Whale vocalization ranges, which vary by location, habitat and times of the year. The study aims at better understanding the impact of noise on vocalization ranges and to determine optimal locations for passive killer whale acoustic monitoring stations. Simulated sounds including calls of Killer Whales shall be projected underwater from a stationary source and recorded via hydrophones at various distances and different angles from the source via a mobile platform (small vessel). This information will also be used to determine the optimal locations for passive acoustic monitoring and tracking of whales. The activities permitted under this license include the following: 1. Simulated sounds including calls of Killer Whales may be projected underwater from a stationery source (anchored vessel) via an underwater sound projector suspended at a fixed depth of either 10 or 25 m and recorded via two or more hydrophones at various distances and different angles. 2. Sound projection shall not be conducted when cetaceans are present within 5km of the recording and sound projection vessel. 3. The area is to be monitored visually and acoustically for cetaceans for 30 minutes prior to acoustic trials to ensure that no cetaceans are present within 5 km. If cetaceans are present within 5 km, acoustic trials must be delayed or stopped and monitoring for an additional 30 minutes shall continue before acoustic trials can be reinitiated.
  • Explanation for issuing licence(#DFO-PAF SARA 106), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2010-01-01)

    Authorized representatives from DFO, the Animal Health Center and the Vancouver Aquarium are licensed to collect for diagnostic purposes: all tissues, organ fluids and/or blood of dead salvaged parts or surplus material collected from dead marine mammals and turtles.
  • Explanation for issuing licence(#DFO-PAF SARA 107), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2010-02-09)

    Authorized representatives from DFO, the Animal Health Center and the Vancouver Aquarium are licensed to collect for diagnostic purposes: all tissues, organ fluids and/or blood of dead salvaged parts or surplus material collected from dead marine mammals and turtles.
  • Explanation for issuing licence(#DFO-PAF SARA 151 ), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2010-01-01)

    Authorized representatives from DFO and the Vancouver Aquarium are licensed to disentangle pinnipeds, cetaceans or sea turtles from fishing gear and other debris of human origin.
  • Explanation for issuing licence(#DFO-PAF SARA 153 ), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2012-08-02)

    Authorized representatives of the Fisheries Agency, Ministry of Agriculture, Forest and Fisheries, are licensed to collect photographic identification, video tape and line transect sighting surveys to aid in the research and recovery of these species at risk by determining abundance estimates.
  • Explanation for issuing licence(#DFO-PAF SARA 159 ), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2013-01-22)

    Authorized representatives from DFO, the Animal Health Center and the Vancouver Aquarium are licensed to collect for diagnostic purposes: all tissues, organ fluids and/or blood of dead salvaged parts or surplus material collected from dead marine mammals and turtles.
  • Explanation for issuing licence(#DFO-PAF SARA 160 ), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2013-01-23)

    Authorized representatives from DFO and the Vancouver Aquarium are licensed to disentangle pinnipeds, cetaceans or sea turtles from fishing gear and other debris of human origin.
  • Explanation for issuing licence(#DFO-PAF SARA 276 ), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2013-01-01)

    Authorized representatives from DFO are licensed to conduct photo identification, prey and scat collection, biopsy sampling, tagging, underwater video and acoustic playback as per research protocols.
  • Explanation for issuing licence(#DFO-PPAC-18-00008), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2018-04-19)

    Disentanglement of all cetacean, pinniped and sea turtle species on the Pacific Coast. The disentanglement technique will be decided by the DFO primary investigator in consultation with team members and other personnel. The exact method will depend on the nature of the debris, available equipment, location, physical condition and size of the animal. Drones may be used to assess and identify gear tangle configuration to assist with disentanglement A DFO approved tag may be attached to each released animal.
  • Explanation for issuing licence(#DFO-PPAC-18-00023), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2018-05-10)

    Scientific research on all cetacean species on the Pacific Coast to monitor animal health, life history, diet, social structure, population and distribution. Photo-identification of individual cetaceans using natural markings. Closest approach distance to whales is 20 metres for photographic identification. Collection of prey fragments and scat from cetaceans. Closest approach distance to whales is 20 metres for prey fragment and scat collection. Collection of skin and blubber biopsy samples using a 12 gram dart deployed from a pneumatic dart projector at closest approach distance of 10 metres to whales. Maximum number of samples permitted per annum per species: 50 samples for Killer, Humpback, Blue and Fin whale; 25 samples for Minke, Sei, Grey and Sperm whale; 10 samples for Baird's Beaked, Cuvier's Beaked and North Pacific Right whale; 5 samples for Hubb's Beaked and Stejneger's Beaked whales. Collection of data on vocalisations and swimming behaviour of killer whales using data loggers fitted with flexible suction cups to be temporarily affixed to killer whale dorsal surface by 5 metre long fibreglass pole. Closest approach distance of 4 metres to whales for attachment of data logger as per research protocols. Maximum of 20 individual killer whales per annum. Collection of data on cetacean movement patterns by use of miniature surface mounted satellite tags. Closest approach distance of 4 metres to whales for attachment of tag as per research protocols. Maximum of 20 individuals per annum of the following species: Grey, Killer, Fin, Blue, Sei, Minke, Humpback and North Pacific Right whale. Collection of underwater video of cetacean behaviour by means of a pole-mounted camera deployed from vessel. Closest approach distance of 5 metres to whales for video collection. Investigation of cetacean behavioural acoustics by means of playbacks of underwater sounds. Only marine mammal sounds are permitted to be used, at source levels equal to or less than natural levels produced by vocalizing animals. Collection of data (e.g., photogrammetric measurements, breath samples) using Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS). UAS must be operated by trained assistants at an altitude of at least 5 meters above whales.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#PAC MML SARA 16), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2005-06-21)

    Cetaceans will be approached, by researchers, for collection of photo-identification data of individuals and prey fragments for diet determination. No impact to whales or habitat is expected. The study will contribute knowledge of cetaceans and support recovery objectives for these species.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#PAC MML SARA 24), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2006-03-12)

    A line transect survey will be conducted on the west side of Vancouver Island, British Columbia. The location and number of all marine mammals will be documented. All killer whales and humpback whales encountered will be photographed for photo-identification. Behavioural data will be collected from as many Southern Resident killer whales as possible, but will not likely exceed 40 individuals. Behavioural data will be collected using a focal follow approach.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#PAC MML SARA 46), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2006-08-02)

    As part of the Marine Mammal Incident Response Program, Fisheries and Oceans Canada monitors all marine mammal and sea turtle incidents in order to take action in the case of: inappropriate or illegal human activities; to monitor disease in wild stocks; to investigate trends in other natural occurrences that may impact species survival.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#PAC MML SARA 54), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2006-08-08)

    The objective of the work is on-going field studies of cetacean life history, ecology, and conservation status in Pacific waters of Canada.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#PAC MML SARA 67), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2007-04-04)

    Project activities and goals are supported by strategies outlined in the National Recovery Strategy for Northern and Southern Resident Killer whales and the Recovery Strategy for Blue, Fin and Sei Whales.
  • >> See more Permits and Related Agreements documents

Consultation Documents

  • Species at Risk Act - Legal Listing of Aquatic Species, Pacific Region - Consultation Workbook (2004-03-17)

    Your opinion is being sought to assist the government of Canada in making an informed decision on whether to add any or all of the following 10 aquatic species to the Schedule 1 (the List of Wildlife Species at Risk) of the Species at Risk Act (SARA). The species include: Blue Whale, Sei Whale, Humpback Whale, Enos Lake Stickleback, Speckled Dace, Salish Sucker, Cultus Lake Sockeye, Interior Fraser Coho, Sakinaw Lake Sockeye, and Bocaccio. Your input on the impacts of adding these species to the List is important. This workbook has been developed to give you an opportunity to provide Fisheries and Oceans Canada with your feedback, advice, and other comments regarding adding the above mentioned 10 species to Schedule 1 of SARA (Schedule 1 identifies which species are legally protected under SARA).

Recovery Document Posting Plans

  • Recovery Document Posting Plan - Fisheries and Oceans Canada - Fiscal Year 2016-2017 (2018-09-28)

    Under the Species at Risk Act (SARA), the competent Minister(s) must prepare a recovery strategy within one year of listing a species on Schedule 1 of SARA as endangered and within two years of listing a species as extirpated or threatened. A management plan must be prepared within three years for a species listed as special concern. Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) is accountable for 111 of the 518 species listed under SARA. As of February 2016, proposed recovery strategies, management plans and action plans for 57 of those species have not yet been posted to the Species at Risk Public Registry. An additional 23 aquatic species have proposed management or action plans coming due in the future. The following outlines the Department’s plan for posting proposed documents for 64 species on the Species at Risk Public Registry. The Department has a plan to post recovery strategies for 9 species, management plans for 13 species, and action plans for 42 species over the next year. Original publication of the Recovery Document Posting Plan: 2016-05-02
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