Species Profile

Round Pigtoe

Scientific Name: Pleurobema sintoxia
Taxonomy Group: Molluscs
COSEWIC Range: Ontario
COSEWIC Assessment Date and Status Change: May 2014
COSEWIC Status: Endangered
COSEWIC Status Criteria: B1ab(i,ii,iii,iv,v)+2ab(i,ii,iii,iv,v)
COSEWIC Reason for Designation: This mussel species occupies a small area in the Lake St. Clair watershed and three other watersheds in southern Ontario, where its habitat has been declining in extent and quality. Urban development, agricultural runoff, and impacts from the Zebra Mussel and the Round Goby are threatening the survival of the species in Canada.
COSEWIC History of Status Designation: Designated Endangered in May 2004. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2014.
SARA Status: Schedule 1, Endangered
Date of Listing (yyyy-mm-dd): 2005-07-14

Please note that this information is provided for general information purposes only. For the most up to date and accurate list of species listed under the Species at Risk Act, please see the Justice Laws Website.

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Round Pigtoe Photo 1

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Information about this species

General Description The Round Pigtoe (Pleurobema sintoxia) is a mollusc belonging to the Family Unionidae. It has the following characteristics and distinguishing features: A medium to large freshwater mussel, which reaches lengths between 75 and 130 mm Somewhat rectangular in shape but may vary with habitat type Compressed and slightly elevated beak (raised part at the top of the shell), extending beyond the hinge line Shell is relatively thick and solid with a roughened surface and concentric rest lines Tan in colour (juveniles), darkening to a deep reddish brown with age Nacre is white or shades of pink Lifespan is unknown, however, other members of the genus may live for over 30 years Distribution The current distribution of the Round Pigtoe is similar to its historical range: New York and Ontario, west to South Dakota, Kansas and Oklahoma, and south to Arkansas and Alabama. In Canada, it occurs only in Ontario, in lakes Erie and St. Clair and in the Detroit, Grand, Niagara, Sydenham and Thames rivers. Currently, it is extant in the Grand, Thames and Sydenham rivers and in Lake St. Clair. The healthiest population is in the Sydenham River, where it is rare but showing signs of recruitment. Overall, its extent of occurrence has decreased by 54%. Habitat and Life History In small rivers, this species can be found in areas of moderate fl ow on substrates of gravel, cobble and boulder. In larger rivers, it is found in mud, sand and gravel at varying depths. The breeding season lasts from early May to late July. Eggs are fertilized in the female gills and held there until the intermediate larval stage (glochidium). When released, the parasitic glochidia attach to the fi ns or gills of an appropriate host fi sh until they metamorphose into juveniles. The rate of survival to the juvenile stage is extremely low. Juveniles release from their host and begin life as a free-living mussel. Host Spotfin Shiner (Cyprinella spiloptera), Northern Redbelly Dace (Phoxinus eos), Bluntnose Minnow (Pimephales notatus) and Bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus). Diet The Round Pigtoe is a filter feeder, consuming bacteria, algae, organic detritus and protozoans. Threats The spread of Zebra Mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) and Quagga Mussels (Dreissena spp.) throughout the Great Lakes has severely impacted or eliminated the Round Pigtoe in the offshore waters of Lake St. Clair, Lake Erie, and the Detroit and Niagara rivers. Other threats include deteriorating water quality and loss of habitat resulting from poor agricultural and urban land-use practices. Similar Species This species is similar to the Wabash Pigtoe (Fusconaia flava) and the Hickorynut (Obovaria olivaria).

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Recovery Initiatives

Status of Recovery Planning

Recovery Strategies :

Name Recovery Strategy for Northern Riffleshell (Epioblasma torulosa rangiana), Snuffbox (Epioblasma triquetra), Round Pigtoe (Pleurobema sintoxia), Mudpuppy Mussel (Simpsonaias ambigua) and Rayed Bean (Villosa fabalis) in Canada.
Status Final posting on SAR registry

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Recovery Team

Ontario Freshwater Mussel Recovery Team

  • Todd Morris - Chair/Contact - Fisheries and Oceans Canada
    Phone: 905-336-4734  Fax: 905-336-6437  Send Email

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Documents

PLEASE NOTE: Not all COSEWIC reports are currently available on the SARA Public Registry. Most of the reports not yet available are status reports for species assessed by COSEWIC prior to May 2002. Other COSEWIC reports not yet available may include those species assessed as Extinct, Data Deficient or Not at Risk. In the meantime, they are available on request from the COSEWIC Secretariat.

123 record(s) found.

Reports on the Progress of Recovery Document Implementation

  • Report on the Progress of Recovery Strategy Implementation for the Wavyrayed Lampmussel, Northern Riffleshell, Snuffbox, Round Pigtoe, Mudpuppy Mussel and Rayed Bean in Canada for the Period 2006–2011 (2013-06-11)

    As a result of the overlap in the historical and current ranges of the Wavyrayed Lampmussel, Northern Riffleshell, Snuffbox, Round Pigtoe, Salamander Mussel (formerly known as the Mudpuppy Mussel) and Rayed Bean, there is substantial commonality in threats to their continued survival. A key component in progress toward fulfilling recovery objectives has been the systematic collaboration with existing ecosystem recovery teams. This collaboration has taken the form of multiple research projects and stewardship teams that actively coordinate and monitor habitat improvement projects on the Ausable, Sydenham, Grand and Thames river systems, as well as Walpole Island. These collaborative efforts resulted in concrete progress in the form of habitat improvement and protection, and important biological insights of these species.

COSEWIC Status Reports

  • COSEWIC assessment and status report on the round pigtoe Pleurobema sintoxia in Canada (2004-05-01)

    The Round Pigtoe, Pleurobema sintoxia (Rafinesque, 1820) is a medium to large freshwater mussel (maximum length in Canada ~130 mm) that is usually somewhat rectangular in shape. The shell is relatively thick and solid with a roughened surface. It may be tan in colour in juveniles but darkens to a characteristic deep reddish brown with age.
  • COSEWIC status appraisal summary on the Round Pigtoe Pleurobema sintoxia in Canada (2016-10-31)

    This mussel species occupies a small area in the Lake St. Clair watershed and three other watersheds in southern Ontario, where its habitat has been declining in extent and quality. Urban development, agricultural runoff, and impacts from the Zebra Mussel and the Round Goby are threatening the survival of the species in Canada.

Response Statements

  • Response Statement - Round Pigtoe (2004-10-22)

    Species limited to a small area of occupancy in the Lake St.Clair and three watersheds in southern Ontario with continuing declines in habitat area, extent and quality. Threats include urban, industrial and agricultural development and irreversible impacts from Zebra Mussels in Lake St. Clair, with potential threats from introduction of Zebra Mussels in impoundments in the Sydenham River.
  • Response Statement - Round Pigtoe (2015-01-13)

    This mussel species occupies a small area in the Lake St. Clair watershed and three other watersheds in southern Ontario, where its habitat has been declining in extent and quality. Urban development, agricultural runoff, and impacts from the Zebra Mussel and the Round Goby are threatening the survival of the species in Canada.

Recovery Strategies

  • Recovery Strategy for Northern Riffleshell (Epioblasma rangiana), Snuffbox (Epioblasma triquetra), Round Pigtoe (Pleurobema sintoxia), Salamander Mussel (Simpsonaias ambigua) and Rayed Bean (Villosa fabalis) in Canada (2019-07-30)

    Freshwater mussels are among the world’s most imperiled taxa with declines reported on a global scale (Bogan 1993; Lydeard et al. 2004). The rich unionid fauna of North America has been hit particularly hard with over 70% of the approximately 300 species showing evidence of declines with many now considered rare, endangered, threatened or imperiled (Allan and Flecker 1993; Williams et al. 1993). Canada is home to 55 unionid species, 41 of which can be found in the province of Ontario with 18 species having Canadian distributions restricted to this province. The rivers of southwestern Ontario, primarily those draining into Lake St. Clair and Lake Erie, are home to the richest unionid assemblages in Canada. The Sydenham River has historically been considered to be the richest unionid river in all of Canada (Clarke 1992) with a total species count of 34 (Metcalfe-Smith et al. 2003), however, recent evidence suggests that the Grand (Metcalfe-Smith et al. 2000) and Thames rivers, also with historic species counts of 34, were equally diverse.

Action Plans

  • Action Plan for the Sydenham River in Canada: An Ecosystem Approach (2018-05-24)

    The Sydenham River in southwestern Ontario supports an amazing diversity of aquatic life. Located in the lower Great Lakes basin, the river contains the greatest diversity of freshwater mussel species of any watershed in Canada. At least 34 species of mussels and 80 species of fishes have been found here. Many of these species are rare and seventeen species, including eleven mussels and six fishes, have been assessed by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) as Endangered, Threatened or Special Concern. The majority of these species are protected under the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA) and seven freshwater mussels (Round Hickorynut, Kidneyshell, Northern Riffleshell, Snuffbox, Round Pigtoe, Rayed Bean and Salamander Mussel) and two fishes (Eastern Sand Darter – Ontario population and Northern Madtom) are the focus of this action plan. The needs of these at risk fishes and mussels within the Sydenham River watershed will be addressed using a multi-species, ecosystem-based approach. The present plan is guided by four SARA recovery strategies for these nine species and builds on the ecosystem-based Sydenham River Recovery Strategy completed in 2003.

Orders

  • Order Acknowledging Receipt of the Assessments Done Pursuant to Subsection 23(1) of the Act (2004-10-19)

    The Order acknowledges receipt by the Governor in Council of the assessments of the status of wildlife species done pursuant to subsection 23(1) of the Species at Risk Act (SARA) by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC). The purpose of SARA is to prevent wildlife species from being extirpated or becoming extinct, to provide for the recovery of wildlife species that are extirpated, endangered or threatened as a result of human activity and to manage species of special concern to prevent them from becoming endangered or threatened.
  • Order Amending Schedules 1 to 3 to the Species at Risk Act (volume 139, number 15, 2005) (2005-07-27)

    The Minister of the Environment is recommending, pursuant to section 27 of the Species at Risk Act (SARA), that 43 species be added to Schedule 1, the List of Wildlife Species at Risk. This recommendation is based on scientific assessments by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) and on consultations with governments, Aboriginal peoples, wildlife management boards, stakeholders and the Canadian public.

COSEWIC Annual Reports

  • COSEWIC Annual Report - 2004 (2004-09-16)

    2004 Annual Report to the Canadian Endangered Species Conservation Council (CESCC) from the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada.
  • COSEWIC Annual Report - 2013-2014 (2014-10-15)

    Under Canada’s Species at Risk Act (SARA), the foremost function of COSEWIC is to "assess the status of each wildlife species considered by COSEWIC to be at risk and, as part of the assessment, identify existing and potential threats to the species". COSEWIC held two Wildlife Species Assessment Meetings in this reporting year (October, 2013 to September, 2014) from November 24 to November 29, 2013 and from April 27 to May 2, 2014. During the current reporting period, COSEWIC assessed the status or reviewed the classification of 56 wildlife species. The wildlife species assessment results for the 2012-2013 reporting period include the following: Extinct: 0 Extirpated: 0 Endangered: 23 Threatened: 12 Special Concern: 20 Data Deficient: 0 Not at Risk: 1 Total: 56 Of the 56 wildlife species examined, COSEWIC reviewed the classification of 40 that had been previously assessed. The review of classification for 25 of those wildlife species resulted in a confirmation of the same status as the previous assessment.

Permits and Related Agreements

  • Explanation for issuing other simliar documents(#DFO-14-HCAA-01831), persuant to the provisions of section 74 of SARA (2017-05-16)

    The proposed project involves the replacement of the Argyle Street Bridge on the Grand River in Caledonia, Ontario. The existing nine-span bridge will be replaced with a five-span bridge, built adjacent to the existing bridge using piers constructed on temporary work platforms (five causeway pods) to access the existing bridge and install the temporary and permanent bridge piers. Once the new piers are constructed, the replacement bridge will be jacked up and slid over on to the piers and the causeway pods and connector bridges removed.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(# DFO-15-PCAA-00024), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2015-07-01)

    The objective is to sample Round Goby for both behavioural and genomic assays. The source site will be St. Claire River near Sarnia, where the Round Goby was initially found and assumed to be the first longest established site. The established sites will be the river mouths and the invasion fronts will be determined by methods from Bronnenhuber et al. (2011).
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#-CA SECT 73 SARA C&A 09-012), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2009-05-29)

    The purpose of the project is to determine the sensitivity of the early life stages (glochidia) of endangered species of freshwater mussels to salt (NaCl and road salt).
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#: DFO-CA SECT 73 SARA C&A 10-002 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2010-03-25)

    The Medway Sanitary Trunk Sewer project involves the installation of a sanitary trunk along the Medway Valley to service the communities in north London. Phase 2B of the Medway Sanitary Trunk Sewer is the final extension of the Medway trunk sewer. Phase 2A was constructed in 2007 and involved two crossings and associated mussel relocation and monitoring. The current phase, 2B, involves three crossings on Medway Creek and associated mussel relocation and monitoring. The total estimated prescribed search area for all three crossings is 1828 m2. In addition to the three crossing sites, two other areas need to be searched for mussels, including the relocation area and a control area. The presence of mussels in these areas will be documented to assess the potential impact, if any, of relocated mussels on the population of mussels already living in the relocation sites. Growth and survival of relocated mussels will be monitored and compared to mussels endemic to the relocation site (i.e., control mussels) at one month, one year and two years post re-location.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#17-PCAA-00001), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2017-03-10)

    The St. Clair Region Conservation Authority (SCRCA) is sampling fish and mussels in several locations for presence/absence data. Currently, fish and mussel data is lacking in these areas. Baseline data will be collected to assist in future project proposals and inquiries. Benthic sampling will be undertaken for watershed characterization to allow the SCRCA to assess water quality throughout the watershed. Data obtained will assist the SCRCA in the identification of potential rehabilitation sites and impact monitoring.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#17-PCAA-00004), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2017-03-29)

    The objective of the project is to apply selective lampricide to assess and control Sea Lamprey populations in the Great Lakes. Assessment surveys are routinely conducted in tributaries and lentic areas to determine the presence, distribution, and abundance of Sea Lamprey larvae. In deep water (>0.8 m) areas, surveys are conducted with the application of granular Bayluscide, a bottom-release formulation of lampricide, within the demarcated boundaries of the plots with a standard area of 500 m2. Tributaries harbouring larval Sea Lamprey are treated periodically with lampricides to eliminate or reduce larval populations before they recruit to the lake as feeding juveniles. The treatment units administer and analyze TFM, or TFM/Niclosamide mixtures (TFM augmented with Bayluscide 70% wettable powder or 20% emulsifiable concentrate) during stream treatments, and apply 3.2% granular Bayluscide (gB) to control populations inhabiting lentic areas.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#17-PCAA-00009), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2017-04-10)

    The objective of the project is to conduct freshwater mussel surveys and monitoring in Central and Arctic Region. 1) Quantitative sampling - historical monitoring stations on the Thames and Maitland rivers will be revisited and sampling completed during the initial round of monitoring (2005) will be repeated; 2) Semi-quantitative sampling - sampling at Little Bear Creek and Walpole Island will be undertaken using habitat appropriate methods (wading, visual/tactile, searches, calm rakes, etc.); 3) Identification workshop - the workshop will take place in late June over a two-day period. The first day is a laboratory component working with preserved specimens. The second day is spent on-site at a location in the Sydenham River where attendees will develop and practise field identification skills under the guidance of experienced malacologists; 4) Genetic sampling - depending on which species are detected during sampling, it may be necessary to collect genetic samples for further analyses; 5) Depending on which species are found during sampling, it may be necessary to subsample to evaluate the reproductive state of individuals; and, 6) Tagging - when necessary some individuals may be tagged for future identification, using non-invasive tagging techniques.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#18-HCAA-01367 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-08-22)

    The activities authorized by this permit that may cause incidental harm to Kidneyshell (Ptychobranchus fasciolaris), Round Hickorynut (Obovaria subrotunda), and Round Pigtoe (Pleurobema sintoxia) consist of the capture and relocation of species at risk mussels within the prescribed search area of approximately 2,295 m2, which includes the overall cofferdam footprint of 1,442 m2 and a buffer, in the Welland River, during isolation of in-water work areas, cofferdam installation, and dewatering activities. The effects that the activity may cause to the listed species, their critical habitat, and the effects of those changes authorized by the permit include the incidental harm, harassment, or death of Kidneyshell, Round Hickorynut, and Round Pigtoe resulting from their capture, processing, and relocation.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-­PCAA-­00033 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-05-17)

    The objectives of the activities covered by the permit are to test and apply the gear (i.e., mussel brail) required to delineate areas of protected habitat for species at risk (SAR) mussels in non­wadeable habitats. The species listed on this permit may be captured in the course of the work. The activities authorized by the permit consist of the capture of the mussels listed on this permit using a mussel brail within the Grand River. Surveys at randomly distributed sampling sites (50 sites total) will be done by towing a brail along multiple (4 to 5) transects. Tow length (50 or 100 m) will be set after pilot trials during the first week of sampling. These activities will involve the handling of the species listed on this permit for the purposes of identification and processing (count, measure, photograph etc.). Digital vouchers will be taken of any mussels captured, and all mussels will be returned alive to the location of capture.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-HCAA-00700 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-08-06)

    Phragmites australis is an invasive species that is expanding exponentially in Long Point Bay and Rondeau Bay, displacing native species and limiting critical habitat for numerous species at risk. A method that has been used in the United States but is relatively new to Canada includes applying a custom made herbicide, RoundUp (active ingredient glyphosate), with AquaSurf (a surfactant), which has been shown to be effective at reducing Phragmites density and spread. This project is an extension of the works that the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (OMNRF) conducted in 2016, 2017 and 2018 in Long Point Bay and Rondeau Bay as part of a 5-year pilot project to determine the effectiveness of this method in Canada. The current proposal is to treat a total of 48 hectares in the following locations in Rondeau Bay and Long Point Bay by ground application: Rondeau Provincial Park (10 ha), Long Point Bay (5 ha), Turkey Point Region (1 ha), Lower Big Creek Marshes (6 ha), Big Creek Watershed (20 ha), North Shore of the Inner Bay (6 ha), and as required where regrowth is observed in Long Point Bay. This activity may result in the incidental harm, harassment, or death of Eastern Pondmussel (Ligumia nasuta), Round Pigtoe (Pleurobema sintoxia), Lake Chubsucker (Erimyzon sucetta), Pugnose Shiner (Notropis anogenus), Kidneyshell (Ptychobranchus fasciolaris), Rainbow (Villosa iris), Round Hickorynut (Obovaria subrotunda), Mapleleaf (Great Lakes - Upper St. Lawrence River populations) (Quadrula quadrula), Spotted Gar (Lepisosteus oculatus), or Eastern Sand Darter (Ammocrypta pellucida) (Ontario populations) resulting from the application of herbicide, use of heavy equipment for spraying by ground, or oxygen depletion from vegetative die-off.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-PCAA-00008), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-04-29)

    The objectives of the activities covered by this permit are: 1) To conduct quantitative and semi-quantitative surveys for species at risk mussels at sites at locations across southern Ontario to track changes in species and habitat over time, and evaluate recovery efforts; 2) To hold a mussel identification workshop in late June over a two-day period. The second day will be spent at a site on the Sydenham River where attendees will practice field identification skills under guidance of experienced malacologists; 3) Depending on species detected during qualitative and semi-quantitative sampling, to obtain genetic samples for further analyses, and to evaluate reproductive condition of animals found; 4) To conduct a morphometric analyses on animals collected during quantitative and/or semi-quantitative sampling; and, 5) To tag some individuals when necessary for future identification. These activities will involve the capture of all mussel species listed on the permit, via quadrat sampling or timed searches, from sites listed on the permit. For quantitative sampling, substrates in 1 m x 1 m quadrats will be excavated by hand. For all sampling, any mussels found will be identified and processed (count, measure, morphometric analyses, tagging, obtaining genetic samples, etc.). All mussels will be returned alive to the locations they were found after processing.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-PCAA-00010), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-04-29)

    The objectives of the activities covered by this permit application are to conduct fish and mussel surveys in the Thames River watershed. Collected baseline data will be used to assist in future project proposals and inquiries. The activities authorized by this permit consist of the capture of any of the species listed on this permit from the Thames River watershed, and the handling of any of the species listed on this permit for the purposes of identification and processing (count, measure, photograph, etc.). Fishes will be released alive with the exception of some smaller fishes that may be retained to confirm identification. All mussels will be returned alive to the locations they were found. Fish sampling will be completed through the use of a backpack electrofishing unit. Mussel surveys will adhere to Mackie et al. (2008).
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-PCAA-00011), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-04-29)

    The objectives of the activities covered by this permit are to conduct fish and mussel surveys in the St. Clair River watershed and the Lake St. Clair watershed. Collected baseline data will be used to assist in future project proposals and inquiries. The activities authorized by this permit consist of the capture of any of the species listed on this permit from the St. Clair River watershed and the Lake St. Clair watershed, which will require the handling of any of the species listed on this permit for the purposes of identification and processing (count, photograph, etc.). Fishes will be released alive with the exception of some smaller fishes that may be retained to confirm identification. All mussels will be returned alive to the locations they were found. Sampling will be completed through the use of a backpack electrofishing unit, seine net, or minnow traps where necessary, using the Ontario Stream Assessment Protocol (OSAP). Mussel surveys will adhere to Mackie et al. (2008).
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-PCAA-00016), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-05-13)

    The objectives of the activities covered by the permit are to conduct a survey (seining and trawling) of the East Sydenham River to determine if Northern Madtom (Noturus stigmosus) still exists in this watershed. Previous recent surveys have been unsuccessful in detecting this species. The last known record of Northern Madtom in the East Sydenham River was from 1929 near Alvinston, Ontario, and from 1975 near Florence, Ontario. The other species listed on the permit may be captured incidentally during the surveys. The activities authorized by the permit consist of the capture of Northern Madtom from the East Sydenham River using a small mesh trawl and/or a small mesh seine net. The gear type used will depend on habitat conditions and water levels at each site. Identification and processing will involve the handling of Northern Madtom (count, measure, photograph etc.). After fishes are processed (identified, measured) they will be released back to the river, alive. Vouchers will be collected using digital cameras, but some vouchers of smaller fishes may be retained in 10% formalin to confirm identification, if digital vouchers cannot be collected. These survey activities may result in the incidental capture and handling of Eastern Sand Darter (Ammocrypta pellucida) and the species at risk mussels listed on the permit, for the purposes of identification and processing (count, measure, photograph etc.). Any species at risk incidentally captured will be returned alive to the location of capture.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-PCAA-00020), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-05-13)

    The objectives of the activities covered by the permit are: 1) to study post-excystment juvenile unionid mussel dispersion; 2) to study the effects of multiple stressors on unionid mussel suspension feeding; 3) to study the effect of shear stress on juvenile unionid settlement; 4) to study the association between flow velocity and shell orientations and morphometrics; and, 5) to study the physical conditions present in mussel beds. The species listed on the permit may be captured incidentally during this work. The activities authorized by the permit consist of the incidental capture of species listed on the permit from the Ausable, Grand, Sydenham, and Thames rivers. For the juvenile studies, excavations along a transect across the river will be undertaken using an airlift system that will vacuum up the fine sediments and any juvenile mussels in a 12 x 12 cm quadrat. The excavated material will be carefully processed through a series of sieves to define size classes of sediment. For feeding studies, species will be collected via three possible methods: "raccooning" and excavation; manual sieving through the sediment; and, visual searching (depending on water clarity). These activities will involve the handling of the species listed on the permit for the purposes of identification and processing (count, measure, marking, photograph etc.). Any juveniles found will be measured, photographed, and, along with the sediment, returned to their original place along the transect. All mussel species at risk, once identified, will be measured, marked and returned to the spot where they were collected. The marking is completed with a metal probe that is used to etch the periostracum of the shell (with a unique number), which does not harm the mussel.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-PCAA-00038 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-05-30)

    The objective of the activities covered by the permit is to sample municipal drains for the purpose of classifying unrated drains following the Classifying Ontario Municipal Drains Protocol (Fisheries and Oceans Canada). As fisheries assessments have not been previously conducted on many unrated municipal drains, the species listed on the permit may inhabit these drains and may be captured incidentally during the course of the work. The activities authorized by the permit include: 1. The incidental capture of species at risk (SAR) from the locations listed on the permit using seine nets and/or backpack electrofishing units. Within each sample site, approximately 40 m or 10x the wetted width of the watercourse will be sampled for fishes using either a backpack electrofisher, or a seine net depending on habitat suitability. Within the sample site, block nets will be set up and a minimum of three passes will be completed; 2. The handling of the listed SAR for the purposes of identification (count, measure, photograph, etc.). With the exception of vouchers that may be retained to confirm identification, all fishes will be released alive after processing. Vouchers will be collected using digital cameras for larger fishes and all mussels; however, some vouchers of smaller fishes may be retained in 10% formalin or 95% ethanol to confirm identification (if digital vouchers cannot be collected); and, 3. The possession and transport of any of the listed species that are killed incidentally or for vouchering purposes, preserved in 10% formalin or 95% ethanol.
  • Explanation for issuing permit(#19-PCAA-00041 ), persuant to the provisions of section 73 of SARA (2019-06-17)

    The objective of the activities covered by the permit are to conduct habitat assessments and survey for species at risk mussels in areas where in-water works are proposed at various locations across Ontario. The species listed on the permit may be captured incidentally during the course of this work. The activities authorized by the permit include: 1. The capture of the species listed on the permit via visual search using viewing boxes and raccooning, from various waterbodies throughout Ontario; 2. The handling of the species listed on the permit for the purposes of identification and photographing; and, 3. The possession and transport of dead specimens/shells/valves of any of the species listed on the permit found during the course of the sampling.
  • >> See more Permits and Related Agreements documents

Consultation Documents

  • Consultation on Amending the List of Species under the Species at Risk Act: November 2004 (2004-11-23)

    The Government of Canada proclaimed the Species at Risk Act (SARA) on June 5, 2003 as part of its strategy for the protection of wildlife species at risk. Attached to the act is Schedule 1, the list of the species that receive protection under SARA, hereinafter referred to as the 'SARA list'. Canadians are invited to comment on whether all or some of the species included in this document should be added to the SARA list.
  • Consultation Workbook on the Addition of the Round Pigtoe to the List of Wildlife Species at Risk (2004-09-29)

    Your opinion is being sought to assist the government of Canada in making an informed decision on whether to add the Round Pigtoe to the Schedule 1 (the List of Wildlife Species at Risk) of the Species at Risk Act (SARA). Your input on the impacts of adding this species to the List is important. This workbook has been developed to give you an opportunity to provide Fisheries and Oceans Canada with your feedback, advice, and other comments regarding adding this species to Schedule 1 of SARA (Schedule 1 identifies which species are legally protected under SARA).

Critical Habitat Orders

Recovery Document Posting Plans

  • Recovery Document Posting Plan - Fisheries and Oceans Canada - Fiscal Year 2016-2017 (2018-09-28)

    Under the Species at Risk Act (SARA), the competent Minister(s) must prepare a recovery strategy within one year of listing a species on Schedule 1 of SARA as endangered and within two years of listing a species as extirpated or threatened. A management plan must be prepared within three years for a species listed as special concern. Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) is accountable for 111 of the 518 species listed under SARA. As of February 2016, proposed recovery strategies, management plans and action plans for 57 of those species have not yet been posted to the Species at Risk Public Registry. An additional 23 aquatic species have proposed management or action plans coming due in the future. The following outlines the Department’s plan for posting proposed documents for 64 species on the Species at Risk Public Registry. The Department has a plan to post recovery strategies for 9 species, management plans for 13 species, and action plans for 42 species over the next year. Original publication of the Recovery Document Posting Plan: 2016-05-02
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